Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Fark)   With the release of the Fark Fiction Anthology and the first Fark Book Fair this Saturday, you may not find the time to write, but we did it anyway. It must be a day beginning in "Wed". Come on in and spin a yarn. THIS is your Fark Writer's Thread   ( fark.com) divider line
    More: CSB, Main Breastfeeding employee, Cascading Style Sheets, Sports Ricky Williams, Entertainment Professional Pokémon, rubber band gun, comments, TotalFark subscriber, browser cache  
•       •       •

442 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Jul 2016 at 10:00 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



54 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2016-07-13 05:45:48 AM  
Morning all!

Congrats to toraque in getting the "Heart of Farkness", our new Fark Fiction Anthology, out the door and into our hearts....of farkness? Whatever. You, toraque, are da man! :D *chest bump*

We've got the book fair on Saturday. I'm probably going to submit it Friday night (so it'll likely go green sometime then). Hope you published authors are all ready to show off your work to those of us who couldn't be bothered to google your name! :D


okay, now that business is out of the way, how's the writing going? It's been a busy week for me, but I actually got some writing done the last week, slowly storming the castle (or hill, in this case). Got two physical pages of stuff I wrote out in my off time that I need to toss into the story (been working up to those parts of the story), so when I do eventually toss them in, they'll likely expand by another several pages each.

How's writing going for you lot?
 
2016-07-13 06:12:36 AM  
I didn't get any writing done this week, yet, but I -did- walk over to the liquor store, so I count that as "writing-related work" as far as this week is concerned.
 
2016-07-13 10:04:41 AM  
The fam's been battling a murderer's row of illnesses -- thankfully nothing terminal, but these aren't seasonal bugs either.  Nothing to be done about it but be a grown-up; passions get sidelined indefinitely when real life demands attention.
 
2016-07-13 10:06:12 AM  
This thread just reminded me that I started writing a book a couple years ago and completely forgot about it. I should try and pick that up again.

Next week.
 
2016-07-13 10:16:10 AM  
this piss was coming down in sheets, a golden torrent of glitter, as if god wardrobed the whole city into sequins. Master General Jerry Cotter strode dutifully through the maelstrom of pee, nodding at the troops he walked past. they saluted out of respect, flakes of urea dropping from their beards. Cotter did not return the salute, also out of respect. he had no beard, nor urea flakes.

reaching the speartip of the advance, the holdup was readily visible: a towed wagon had broken an axle on a bridge, bringing forty thousand divisions to a hold. Cotter sighed and drew his kaamtra which is like a katana but also a shotgun and made out of diamond fiber. with one powerful boot he kicked the wagon over the edge, the screams of the wounded still strapped inside their ambulance beds fading away until they crashed into the rocks below. the nearest soldier was run through with the kaamtra before sheathing it, because duty dictates it draw blood

grizzled Sgt Kevin Dacon said to him, "sir thank you for helping us unclog the line, those who perished by your steel will be written on the Wall of Ten Trillion Names"

Cotter grimly nodded and said only, "its a living"
 
2016-07-13 10:19:04 AM  
He had begun to snore as his hand slipped off the mouse and against his drink. Whiskey and water soaked his lap. Snapping awake, he reached for a towel and managed to dry off to where it didn't look like he had wet his pants. How long he had been out? Long enough said the black screen in front of him.Tapping the key, the lighthouse came back into view. It was the best image from his last. The structure rose up behind the haunted driftwood forest, daring all those near to explore. And such adventures it held. The picture also showed how perilously close to the water to structure was. Someone said it may be a little as ten years before nature claimed it. He wanted to go back there before it washed into the sea.To go back with her.A frizzy haired apple, she was the first girl that had ever paid attention to him. And for that, he was forever grateful. She had taught him beauty was internal.Even the first encounter was unusual. Passed out and dressed in a sweatshirt and panties after a short, furious drinking session, she caught his eye. The smell of stale alcohol and vomit didn't put him off. Another guy was bugging her to get up, using a small silver bell that was on the coffee table. She weakly tried slapping at it, turning her face toward the back of the couch. Then he pulled on the hem of the shirt, revealing the pale legs. It really wasn't funny to him or the others in the room.With a hand on the fellow's shoulder, he told him to act his age and gave him a drink. With a grumble, he finally gave up his bothering. Sitting at a table a few beers later, a pair of chubby arms snaked around his waist, followed by a soft kiss his neck. Reflexively, his arms followed the lead as they were introduced. The girl became more animated as the night wore on. They found common interests and appreciation of good manners.Still tipsy as the entered the bedroom, she only wanted to talk. He respected the request. Talk morphed into kissing and dancing, but not loving and the sun rose on them as they waltzed. To him, she resembled a painting, still half-dressed in the growing light. With a final kiss, she ushered him out of the room and he went home.A few months later he came to the beach town and ran into her waiting for a table at a restaurant. The hair was a limp mass in the humidity, but it framed the pale face better. A printed scoop necked t-shirt showed the little bit of cleavage. With a happy squeal, she hugged him. It turned out she was alone for the evening and he joined her for dinner. It was as if she had never left. As the conversation went from fish surveys, to the Fibonacci mean and finally to "Waiting for Godot", they shared bites of each others' meals. No one else around mattered. He was where he needed to be.They left arm in arm. Picking a bougainvillea from a bush along the street, he placed it her hair. The sun had begun to set. Looking up, the lighthouse beckoned them at the far end of the harbor. They arrived to find it closed. A shake found the door unlocked. With naughty and knowing looks, they went in. The 122 steps to the top went by in flash. Panting, they reached the balcony door and she pulled him through.The iron landing was the platform to watch the passing boats. The fading sunlight reflected in their eyes as they leaned in on each other. A dolphin broke the surface behind a trawler about fifty yards out, looking for a free meal. In the shadows of the fading light, the whole scene became an aphrodisiac. Soft lips hid a tongue tasting of chocolate silk pie and Chardonnay. Cloth ebbed with the tide. Their pale bodies shone against the black paint. It didn't matter if anyone watched. The public declaration of love was their raison d'être. The homely are as sexy as everyone else and we refuse to hide.It was long past dark before they were spent. As before, she gave a small kiss before she sent him away. Again, a promise was made to meet, but it never was to be.So much time had passed since then. He had married and divorced. She had not ever had a significant relationship, as far as he knew. And here he was, thirty five years later wondering whether she was well.Pouring more whiskey in the glass, he typed her name in the box. There were no close matches. Switching over to images, he saw one or two that looked close. But when he clicked through, they turned out false. It wasn't surprising. Even back then, she didn't like photographs. Adding the city where he knew she lived last, helped. The address and phone number came up. He reached for the phone...and stopped.Maybe it was better to let the dead rest.
 
2016-07-13 10:20:58 AM  
This place needs an edit function so breaks and punctuation can be replaced.

Here it is properly formatted.

http://anothergovernmentemployee.blogspot.com/2016/04/sunset-on-light​h​ouse-blogophilia-89.html
 
2016-07-13 10:37:57 AM  
Some very big news: I have a literary agent. I am now represented byVaughne  Hansen of the
Virginia Kidd Literary Agency.

For reference, past and present clients of the agency include authors such as John Varley, Alan Dean Foster, Ursula K. Leguin, Anne McCaffrey, and Gene Wolfe, among others.

I originally contacted another agent there. He wanted to take me on, but Vaughne convinced him to let her represent me instead. And she hadn't even finished the novel!

They also offered me a full contract instead of a provisional one in other words, a longterm contract instead of one that expires in six months. They have a lot of confidence in me,
obviously.

I've been pretty excited since I heard the news last week. To say the least.
 
2016-07-13 10:38:13 AM  
Not much done in the way of writing, sadly.  I'm looking forward to having time for it again!

img.fark.netView Full Size


In case anyone missed the last thread, Heart of Farkness is available in ebook, and it looks like the printed version is now up for sale!
 
2016-07-13 10:38:38 AM  

RealityChuck: Some very big news: I have a literary agent. I am now represented byVaughne  Hansen of the
Virginia Kidd Literary Agency.

For reference, past and present clients of the agency include authors such as John Varley, Alan Dean Foster, Ursula K. Leguin, Anne McCaffrey, and Gene Wolfe, among others.

I originally contacted another agent there. He wanted to take me on, but Vaughne convinced him to let her represent me instead. And she hadn't even finished the novel!

They also offered me a full contract instead of a provisional one in other words, a longterm contract instead of one that expires in six months. They have a lot of confidence in me,
obviously.

I've been pretty excited since I heard the news last week. To say the least.


Nice, congrats!
 
2016-07-13 10:39:17 AM  
Unfortunately work has exploded in my face. I will not have my anthology ready for the Book Fair and I fell down on the job of helping with Mr. Squirrel's Big Book of Stories. That said, I always look at the bright side on these things and hope to complete all of my current writing projects in the near future (he said rather ambiguously).
 
2016-07-13 10:40:09 AM  

RealityChuck: I've been pretty excited since I heard the news last week. To say the least.


That is awesome! Congratulations!
 
2016-07-13 10:49:24 AM  

Old_Chief_Scott: RealityChuck: I've been pretty excited since I heard the news last week. To say the least.

That is awesome! Congratulations!


Yeah , that's amazing news!
 
2016-07-13 10:51:17 AM  
Hey everyone,

Writing is going okay. Had to spend the week filling in all the potholes in my plot, so got about a dozen pages of notes and outlines for me to work with. Can't complain about it since it needed to get done.

My weekly question is this: Who here has a writing process? I know everyone has a different process that works for them, be it coffee and cigarettes or a 3 am keyboard symphony, but I'm interested in knowing what people came up with that maximizes their productivity.
 
2016-07-13 10:55:47 AM  

Another Government Employee: He had begun to snore as his hand slipped off the mouse and against his drink. ...
...

.So much time had passed since then. He had married and divorced. She had not ever had a significant relationship, as far as he knew. And here he was, thirty five years later wondering whether she was well.Pouring more whiskey in the glass, he typed her name in the box. There were no close matches. Switching over to images, he saw one or two that looked close. But when he clicked through, they turned out false. It wasn't surprising. Even back then, she didn't like photographs. Adding the city where he knew she lived last, helped. The address and phone number came up. He reached for the phone...and stopped.Maybe it was better to let the dead rest.


Bet one more drink and he changes his mind.

Please, please, please don't make it a predictable ending full of regrets for having contacted her.  Not every old flame turns into a psycho biatch over time.  (Some of them were that way while they were together and the guy just ignored the bleeding while enjoying the ride).
 
2016-07-13 10:57:28 AM  
No actual writing this week, as I've been dealing with trying to get the LucklessWifeder a wheelchair based around health insurance etc.

Writing-related though, I ordered a bunch of research/history books for what will probably be my NaNoWriMo effort - which is going to be very loosely based around Benedict Arnold and the Battle of Valcour Island. Hopefully it'll be the first in a Continental Navy inspired historical fiction series.

Will probably pick up a couple of age of sail type novels (recommendations welcome - Probably going to go with at least one Hornblower and one Aubrey-Maturin even though they're Napoleonic era and a little bit later than the time period I'm looking at)

Hoping to re-jigger my unsuccessful Heart of Farkness submission into something better in the next month or so.
 
2016-07-13 10:59:32 AM  

gunshellmav: Hey everyone,

Writing is going okay. Had to spend the week filling in all the potholes in my plot, so got about a dozen pages of notes and outlines for me to work with. Can't complain about it since it needed to get done.

My weekly question is this: Who here has a writing process? I know everyone has a different process that works for them, be it coffee and cigarettes or a 3 am keyboard symphony, but I'm interested in knowing what people came up with that maximizes their productivity.


I use the Snowflake method of outlining (sorry, can't find a better link on my work network), and carve aside at least 30 minutes a day as pure writing time when I'm working on a project.
 
2016-07-13 11:00:59 AM  

RealityChuck: Some very big news: I have a literary agent. I am now represented byVaughne  Hansen of the
Virginia Kidd Literary Agency.

For reference, past and present clients of the agency include authors such as John Varley, Alan Dean Foster, Ursula K. Leguin, Anne McCaffrey, and Gene Wolfe, among others.

I originally contacted another agent there. He wanted to take me on, but Vaughne convinced him to let her represent me instead. And she hadn't even finished the novel!

They also offered me a full contract instead of a provisional one in other words, a longterm contract instead of one that expires in six months. They have a lot of confidence in me,
obviously.

I've been pretty excited since I heard the news last week. To say the least.


Congratulation!!
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2016-07-13 11:12:43 AM  

RealityChuck: Some very big news: I have a literary agent. I am now represented byVaughne  Hansen of the
Virginia Kidd Literary Agency.

For reference, past and present clients of the agency include authors such as John Varley, Alan Dean Foster, Ursula K. Leguin, Anne McCaffrey, and Gene Wolfe, among others.

I originally contacted another agent there. He wanted to take me on, but Vaughne convinced him to let her represent me instead. And she hadn't even finished the novel!

They also offered me a full contract instead of a provisional one in other words, a longterm contract instead of one that expires in six months. They have a lot of confidence in me,
obviously.

I've been pretty excited since I heard the news last week. To say the least.


Congrats!
 
2016-07-13 11:21:32 AM  
After a couple weeks of writer's block, I'm finally making progress. I'm not sure if I can get it done by the book fair, though, since I want to have it proofread before I actually post it up.
 
2016-07-13 11:25:26 AM  

GN Nymph: Another Government Employee: He had begun to snore as his hand slipped off the mouse and against his drink. ...
....So much time had passed since then. He had married and divorced. She had not ever had a significant relationship, as far as he knew. And here he was, thirty five years later wondering whether she was well.Pouring more whiskey in the glass, he typed her name in the box. There were no close matches. Switching over to images, he saw one or two that looked close. But when he clicked through, they turned out false. It wasn't surprising. Even back then, she didn't like photographs. Adding the city where he knew she lived last, helped. The address and phone number came up. He reached for the phone...and stopped.Maybe it was better to let the dead rest.


Bet one more drink and he changes his mind.

Please, please, please don't make it a predictable ending full of regrets for having contacted her.  Not every old flame turns into a psycho biatch over time.  (Some of them were that way while they were together and the guy just ignored the bleeding while enjoying the ride).


Too late.

The grave remains undisturbed.
 
2016-07-13 11:39:47 AM  

RealityChuck: Some very big news: I have a literary agent. I am now represented byVaughne  Hansen of the
Virginia Kidd Literary Agency.

For reference, past and present clients of the agency include authors such as John Varley, Alan Dean Foster, Ursula K. Leguin, Anne McCaffrey, and Gene Wolfe, among others.

I originally contacted another agent there. He wanted to take me on, but Vaughne convinced him to let her represent me instead. And she hadn't even finished the novel!

They also offered me a full contract instead of a provisional one in other words, a longterm contract instead of one that expires in six months. They have a lot of confidence in me,
obviously.

I've been pretty excited since I heard the news last week. To say the least.


One thousand and one congratulations in a Scheherazade style!
 
2016-07-13 11:43:22 AM  

gunshellmav: Hey everyone,

Writing is going okay. Had to spend the week filling in all the potholes in my plot, so got about a dozen pages of notes and outlines for me to work with. Can't complain about it since it needed to get done.

My weekly question is this: Who here has a writing process? I know everyone has a different process that works for them, be it coffee and cigarettes or a 3 am keyboard symphony, but I'm interested in knowing what people came up with that maximizes their productivity.


Perhaps not so much a process as a motivator: Join a writers group. I get deadlines, constructive feedback, tips, support, ideas, ...

For a process, BIC works for me. (butt in chair). Just do it.
 
2016-07-13 11:48:04 AM  
RealityChuck:

Congrats, that's awesome
 
2016-07-13 11:48:23 AM  

archerjoe: Join a writers group.


This.

I think that part of the reason my pace has been so awful is that I haven't had anyone pushing me along. My old critique partner has published her third book and we have sort of drifted apart because I haven't kept pace. One of the regulars here talked about forming a Fark San Diego group but that hasn't gone anywhere.
 
2016-07-13 11:51:17 AM  
gunshellmav:

You need to find your best hour to write during the day, and it's different for everyone. Mine is in the morning, but someone else might be after dinner. Once you find your best hour, try to schedule writing time as close to that hour as you can.
 
2016-07-13 11:56:40 AM  

gunshellmav: Hey everyone,

Writing is going okay. Had to spend the week filling in all the potholes in my plot, so got about a dozen pages of notes and outlines for me to work with. Can't complain about it since it needed to get done.

My weekly question is this: Who here has a writing process? I know everyone has a different process that works for them, be it coffee and cigarettes or a 3 am keyboard symphony, but I'm interested in knowing what people came up with that maximizes their productivity.


Do it for a living.

"Food" is a wonderful motivator
 
2016-07-13 12:00:01 PM  
Here's my update:

I'm at 92.5K words and it's all downhill from here. It's not the exact story I set out to write, but I like it.
 
2016-07-13 12:03:11 PM  
I want to keep my "actually polishing up writing" streak going and get that thing I've totally been meaning to do something with ready for the book fair...but will that interfere with becoming a Pokemon Master?
 
2016-07-13 12:26:22 PM  

RealityChuck: Some very big news: I have a literary agent. I am now represented byVaughne  Hansen of the
Virginia Kidd Literary Agency.

For reference, past and present clients of the agency include authors such as John Varley, Alan Dean Foster, Ursula K. Leguin, Anne McCaffrey, and Gene Wolfe, among others.

I originally contacted another agent there. He wanted to take me on, but Vaughne convinced him to let her represent me instead. And she hadn't even finished the novel!

They also offered me a full contract instead of a provisional one in other words, a longterm contract instead of one that expires in six months. They have a lot of confidence in me,
obviously.

I've been pretty excited since I heard the news last week. To say the least.


Very Cool!

media3.giphy.comView Full Size
 
2016-07-13 01:01:35 PM  
I write nonfiction mostly but in the last two months I have posted three erotic novels (conventional, SF, Fantasy)  on Kindle books. I've actually sold a few copies and everyone who bought a copy read it cover to cover! Not quite as much fun as being reviewed by USA Today, but still pretty cool.
 
2016-07-13 01:03:19 PM  
The problem I'm running into is that I know my major plot points for each character but I'm having trouble getting from point to point. But I'm making progress slowly but surely.
 
2016-07-13 01:14:04 PM  

RealityChuck: Some very big news: I have a literary agent. I am now represented byVaughne Hansen of the Virginia Kidd Literary Agency.

Wow, that IS huge.  Congrats.

How'd you get your foot in the door?  Writer's Conference?
 
2016-07-13 01:16:48 PM  
Professor Farksworth The problem I'm running into is that I know my major plot points for each character but I'm having trouble getting from point to point.   .  .  .

That's easy:  "And then, a miracle occurred."
 
2016-07-13 02:31:31 PM  

dragonchild: RealityChuck: Some very big news: I have a literary agent. I am now represented byVaughne Hansen of the Virginia Kidd Literary Agency.
Wow, that IS huge.  Congrats.

How'd you get your foot in the door?  Writer's Conference?


It was at World Fantasy Con last November. I was at a party and noticed they were there. I asked about sending them a proposal and one agent gave me his card (possibly just to get rid of me :). The entire conversion took about 30 seconds.

So I sent him an e-mail listing my credits, plus a short paragraph on each of the two novels I had. Turned out, one of my credits was in a magazine with a story by one of their authors, so they must have had it on hand. He read it and asked for one of the novels. A couple of months later, he asked for the other. And back in April he wrote me he was showing it to the others.

After that, it was just waiting.
 
2016-07-13 03:53:13 PM  

Creepy Lurker Guy: Professor Farksworth The problem I'm running into is that I know my major plot points for each character but I'm having trouble getting from point to point.   .  .  .

That's easy:  "And then, a miracle occurred."


That might work in a fantasy novel. Right now the build is just mundane every day life that I have to map out and make interesting until the climax.
 
2016-07-13 04:03:13 PM  

RealityChuck: Turned out, one of my credits was in a magazine with a story by one of their authors, so they must have had it on hand.

Wow, nice work.  I guess the moral of the story is, getcha name out there.  The party was a chance meeting, but I doubt anything would've fallen into place without this bit.
 
2016-07-13 04:09:58 PM  
Professor Farksworth  That might work in a fantasy novel.   .  .  .

Well, it certainly gets overused in the Bible, and that's one of the most successful books ever published.

Wait.  You said "fantasy".   Nevermind.
 
2016-07-13 05:03:08 PM  

RealityChuck: Some very big news: I have a literary agent. I am now represented byVaughne  Hansen of the
Virginia Kidd Literary Agency.

For reference, past and present clients of the agency include authors such as John Varley, Alan Dean Foster, Ursula K. Leguin, Anne McCaffrey, and Gene Wolfe, among others.

I originally contacted another agent there. He wanted to take me on, but Vaughne convinced him to let her represent me instead. And she hadn't even finished the novel!

They also offered me a full contract instead of a provisional one in other words, a longterm contract instead of one that expires in six months. They have a lot of confidence in me,
obviously.

I've been pretty excited since I heard the news last week. To say the least.


That's awesome! Good for you. Love hearing stories like this on the threads.
 
2016-07-13 05:23:39 PM  

Professor Farksworth: The problem I'm running into is that I know my major plot points for each character but I'm having trouble getting from point to point. But I'm making progress slowly but surely.


welcome to my world.

I've been contemplating writing a short story set in the world at a party, pre-invasion. Sorta fun little gathering (mostly based off real life annual bbq gathering) that I can pull stories from, then towards the end, it's a memory a soldier is having as he's walking through that back yard during a battle for a nearby city.

I really like that idea. If we do another anthology, I may just write that up and toss it in
 
2016-07-13 05:25:26 PM  

Professor Farksworth: until the climax.


the miracle could still work....

/oh god
//oh GOD
///*takes long drag off cigarette*
////was that good for you too?
 
2016-07-13 05:31:43 PM  

RealityChuck: Some very big news: I have a literary agent. I am now represented byVaughne  Hansen of the
Virginia Kidd Literary Agency.

For reference, past and present clients of the agency include authors such as John Varley, Alan Dean Foster, Ursula K. Leguin, Anne McCaffrey, and Gene Wolfe, among others.

I originally contacted another agent there. He wanted to take me on, but Vaughne convinced him to let her represent me instead. And she hadn't even finished the novel!

They also offered me a full contract instead of a provisional one in other words, a longterm contract instead of one that expires in six months. They have a lot of confidence in me,
obviously.

I've been pretty excited since I heard the news last week. To say the least.


Very damned cool. Good job.
 
2016-07-13 05:46:50 PM  
For the novels I'm trying to write, I usually develop a rough story idea (Depths of Potential started from a very vivid dream, for example), then diagram a rough outline. The outline triggers a bunch of background creation (which usually ends up in another outline). Then I write a rough draft of the end and work backwards. I typically hash out a scene or conversation in my head for a few days, trying to get the tone right for the story, before putting electrons on paper. Once I've got it written, I place it in the storyline, then revisit the bloody thing several times to tweak it.

I'd love to favorited! my Mark 1, Mod Zero fundament in the chair and write every day, but I've been blessed/cursed with an actual life- complete with wife, cats, job, and mortgage. I get most of my writing done on weekends. I punched out another five pages on Depths of Potential on Sunday. I'm currently knocking together another chapter for Inferno.
 
2016-07-13 06:18:36 PM  

gunshellmav: Hey everyone,

Writing is going okay. Had to spend the week filling in all the potholes in my plot, so got about a dozen pages of notes and outlines for me to work with. Can't complain about it since it needed to get done.

My weekly question is this: Who here has a writing process? I know everyone has a different process that works for them, be it coffee and cigarettes or a 3 am keyboard symphony, but I'm interested in knowing what people came up with that maximizes their productivity.


I do my writing in the backyard.  The best time for me is mid-morning and late afternoon.  I sit in a comfortable chair, and on my bedside table is a large glass of tea, two pens, and a yellow legal pad.

I set two alarms. The first goes off after one hour, which is my minimum writing time.  The second alarm rings after two hours, which is my mandatory stop time.  If I write for longer than that, the prose becomes stale and my ideas lack verve.

When the time is up, I go inside and transcribe what I had written into electronic form.  This becomes the first edit.

It isn't a perfect method but it works for me.
 
2016-07-13 06:24:31 PM  
My bedside table, in the backyard?  Nonsense.  It is but a normal end table.

One wonders why edit functions aren't on Fark.  Oh well.
 
2016-07-13 06:37:00 PM  

somedude210: Professor Farksworth: The problem I'm running into is that I know my major plot points for each character but I'm having trouble getting from point to point. But I'm making progress slowly but surely.

welcome to my world.

I've been contemplating writing a short story set in the world at a party, pre-invasion. Sorta fun little gathering (mostly based off real life annual bbq gathering) that I can pull stories from, then towards the end, it's a memory a soldier is having as he's walking through that back yard during a battle for a nearby city.

I really like that idea. If we do another anthology, I may just write that up and toss it in


I think I'm going to try to do a few outlines, maybe a timeline and hope that helps. If I can at least write to the point the world goes to shiat, I'm sure the characters will figure out where to go from there on their own. The little bastards never behave anyway.
 
2016-07-13 06:58:38 PM  
No writing done this week.  Still recuperating from the Death by Work-Related Insomnia that was the last two weeks.  On the plus side, I'm getting more than four hours of sleep a night now.  That's something.  Also just turned down some work, which is creepy and unsettling - I'm a freelancer, dammit! should leave some time open for writing related things soon.

Mind you, it was so I could work on entirely different work, but entirely different work, in this case, is of the type that - shocking, unrealistic twist alert - actually leaves some time left over at the end of the day.

I did get that thank you note to my beta reader off, finally.  And I actually managed some networking at a whiskey tasting on Sunday.  Other than that, I'm just waiting for either good or bad writing news on Friday.  That's when the PAGE awards are putting out their quarter finalist list.
 
2016-07-13 07:00:28 PM  

RealityChuck: I've been pretty excited since I heard the news last week. To say the least.


As well you should be!  Congrats!!!

Thanks for sharing your news here.  It's always encouraging to hear this sort of thing!
 
2016-07-13 07:48:28 PM  
Here's a little excerpt from the end of Inferno:

Dante keyed in the code for his tech security chief. The center of his visor displayed Huan's image while the top and left side displayed recent comms activity.

"Huan, talk to me about our intrusion profile for the last three days," Dante ordered brusquely.

Huan's image inclined his head briefly. "Sir, we have logged one thousand, four hundred and eleven unauthorized access attempts during that period. This is on the close order of the average number of intrusion attempts we experience for any given seventy-two hour period."

Dante's visor dropped the visual feed and displayed a series of comparison graphs until Dante impatiently restored the image. "Nothing unusual?" he asked.

The tech's brows furrowed. "The average level of sophistication of the attempted intrusions has been uniformly poor," he said with a frown. "We've experienced no viable threats from any external connections during the last three days. Is there a problem, sir?

Dante leaned back in his chair and nodded. "Probably. I've just heard something that leads me to believe our internal communications may be compromised. I'm trying to reduce the variables to eliminate the possibility of coincidence." Dante was a devout agnostic on the existence of coincidence.

Huan's eyes narrowed, and Dante could hear the tech keying in commands to his console. "How significant do you consider this potential intrusion, sir? Should I run Zeta?"

"Based on your data, I'm starting to think the intrusion may not be through the regular comm systems or data links," the Master of Inferno said thoughtfully. "But I want you to prepare to execute Zeta within two minutes of getting the order to commit."

The tech nodded absently as his hands activated system controls outside the visual pick-up field. "How long shall we maintain this level of increased security, sir?" he asked. "The resulting microsecond lag is likely to warn adversaries that we are concerned."

Dante smiled grimly, and drew a cigar from the humidor in his desk. "If they're deep enough into our systems to notice the difference between a microsecond and a nanosecond lag, we've a whole host of other problems, Huan." He drew heavily on the cigar to get it burning properly, then said, "You once mentioned building decoy nodes within our systems for isolating hostile intrusions. How much of that's been done?"

Huan looked up for a moment. "Sir, my team has the protocols roughed out, but have not yet established the appropriate architecture to execute such a program." He punched in a command sequence and sent the relevant file to Dante's visor. "Running decoy nodes would require a significant percentage of available processing power."

Dante glanced quickly through the executive summary on the file, then nodded again and restored the visual feed. "Not quite what I had in mind, Huan," he said. "As I said, I'm relatively sure we're not compromised through the normal data channels, so we won't be using the decoy nodes to isolate external threats." He grinned savagely and keyed in a quick order to his desk console, sending a file summary to Huan's console.

"What I have in mind is more of a fishing expedition. I want you boys to set up a separate decoy node on each sector of our comm net. We'll run different message traffic through each one, then wait and see which dummy message turns up outside the system. That will tell us where the system is compromised."

Huan nodded thoughtfully and began tapping orders into his console. "That will be simpler to implement, sir," he said slowly, his mind obviously already working on the problem. "I can put the whole team on this, and we ought to have the first node working in about twenty hours. Call it four days for full implementation."

Dante was pleased. "Let's call it an even hundred hours," he said cheerfully. "Everyone on the team gets a bonus for every hour less than that. Overtime is authorized, and I want you to send me a budget for improving the entire system to enable full-scale decoy nodes as originally designed without slowing up regular operations."

The surprise was evident in Huan's voice as he replied. "That is likely to be a very large number, sir. We'll need to essentially double our current configuration."

Laughing out loud, Dante said, "Huan, I don't know if you've noticed, but people are literally fighting to give us their money." He shook his head with amusement. "We got the money. Let's do something useful with it."

Still chuckling, Dante cleared the call and poured himself a drink. "The best way to react to a problem is to turn it into an opportunity," he mused silently. "Like judo- convert the adversary's strength into your asset." He idly considered writing a monograph on the zen of predatory economics, then shook his head and returned to watching the flow of business through his little empire.
 
2016-07-13 08:15:40 PM  
I wrote a short story today called "7-wind and the sea monster" where a pre-Columbian Mayan child meets a Deep One.
I also came up with a time travel method based on my synesthesia. Not sure what I'll do with it.
I'm proofing my 2017 Mayan-Aztec calendar.
Writing a funny steampunk romance novel with my friend.
I also walked 10 miles in my pool today.
 
Displayed 50 of 54 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking





On Twitter



Top Commented
Javascript is required to view headlines in widget.
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report