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(The Stack)   Singapore solves the Facebook-at-work problem, in a pretty definitive way   (thestack.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, E-mail, government email systems, U.S. Secretary, Singapore, Federal government of the United States, Infocomm Development Authority, APAC executive vice-president, private email accounts  
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3071 clicks; posted to Fandom » on 08 Jun 2016 at 8:19 AM (5 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



9 Comments     (+0 »)
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2016-06-08 6:29:12 AM  
Can't imagine any way around that:

senseimarketing.comView Full Size

And yes, I get that it's more of a security thing.
 
2016-06-08 8:52:55 AM  
It's not massively uncommon in large corporates, especially "old-money" type businesses (long established law firms, banks etc), for the internet to be massively locked down with only white listed websites that are deemed essential to be allowed.  I don't mean whitelisted website categories, I mean individual websites.

I have done consultancy work at banks where they are only allowed the major news websites, and specific financial information websites.

They had guest WiFi for personal devices and every floor had multiple "open" standalone PCs that could be used for more generic browsing (though these were still pretty locked down)., but if it was on the main corporate network it had next to zero internet access allowed.
 
2016-06-08 9:11:48 AM  
As a general rule I can't see much upside - and lots of downside - to letting employees access any random website on company equipment to begin with.  Maybe they like having a file of incriminating web logs in their back pocket just in case they decide they want to fire someone.

Singapore's vanguard - and usually less Luddite - innovations finds the city increasingly perceived as a hotbed for technological innovation, most particularly this year, with the launch of the Smart Nation project, which, among other novelties, is subjecting its uncomplaining citizens to a quite extraordinary level of public surveillance as an 'experiment' in IoT systems.

So *that's* what the FBI needs to do to get everyone to calm their tits about data collection.  Just rename themselves SmartFBI.
 
2016-06-08 9:50:38 AM  
Everyone sees the waste in a connected workplace but they forget how it was before.  I started work as an engineer for a Fortune 50 company in 1989.  We had a mainframe computer for running programs but not word processing or spreadsheets.  Using the mainframe usually required you to come in very early to avoid slowdowns that happened during the day.  If I wanted to type a document I would write it longhand and submit it to the group secretary. If I wanted a drawing I would walk to the central documents room fill out a form and come back the next day, repeat if drawing A referenced drawing B.  If I wanted to information I would walk to the company library and talk to a research librarian who would order copies of documents that would show up a day or two later.

Yep I spend too much time on Fark or reading enjoyable stuff but I can type and edit my own documents, pull up pdfs of drawings in seconds and google search for most things.  Instead of going to a central catalog area where I could look through old catalogs for parts that may or may not still be in production I can now download 3d models directly into my cad program.

The internet may have give us distraction but it has also given us efficiency gains.
 
2016-06-08 10:14:54 AM  
Use Wi-Fi.
 
2016-06-08 1:35:14 PM  
Deny all, allow by exception is the rule for most US military facilities (although the people who administer "allow" don't always follow the policies like they should).  We audited a base in Georgia, and their exception list was 99% gods and guns.
 
2016-06-08 2:49:38 PM  

Pinko_Commie: It's not massively uncommon in large corporates, especially "old-money" type businesses (long established law firms, banks etc), for the internet to be massively locked down with only white listed websites that are deemed essential to be allowed.  I don't mean whitelisted website categories, I mean individual websites.

I have done consultancy work at banks where they are only allowed the major news websites, and specific financial information websites.

They had guest WiFi for personal devices and every floor had multiple "open" standalone PCs that could be used for more generic browsing (though these were still pretty locked down)., but if it was on the main corporate network it had next to zero internet access allowed.


Well, that does sound a little worse than here... although here we can't have a guest network because HR is afraid employees will use it to watch porn.

Oddly, while Facebook and Imgur are blocked Fark and Reddit are allowed. I guess we know what sites the IS  guys like. ;)
 
2016-06-08 3:09:33 PM  

Telos: Pinko_Commie: It's not massively uncommon in large corporates, especially "old-money" type businesses (long established law firms, banks etc), for the internet to be massively locked down with only white listed websites that are deemed essential to be allowed.  I don't mean whitelisted website categories, I mean individual websites.

I have done consultancy work at banks where they are only allowed the major news websites, and specific financial information websites.

They had guest WiFi for personal devices and every floor had multiple "open" standalone PCs that could be used for more generic browsing (though these were still pretty locked down)., but if it was on the main corporate network it had next to zero internet access allowed.

Well, that does sound a little worse than here... although here we can't have a guest network because HR is afraid employees will use it to watch porn.

Oddly, while Facebook and Imgur are blocked Fark and Reddit are allowed. I guess we know what sites the IS  guys like. ;)


That's probably not the reason, its all down to categorization.

Facebook is under "Social Networking" which is obviously verboten and Imgur will come under "Personal Network Storage and Backup" which is usually blocked due to the ability to use it to upload data too and exfiltrate corporate info out of the network  in the same way Dropbox and the like could be.

Fark is actually categorized as "News and Media" (which is why they try very hard to keep NSFW stuff off of the site to prevent it dipping into elsewhere).

Reddit is a surprise as thats "Message Boards and Forums" which is a fairly common one to block, but not always.  I expect portions of Reddit however to be blocked as "Adult" for obvious reasons.

/These are the Websense categories, but will be pretty much the same across most vendors.
 
2016-06-08 4:32:31 PM  

Cheron: Everyone sees the waste in a connected workplace but they forget how it was before. I started work as an engineer for a Fortune 50 company in 1989.


In the late 90s I was doing documentation.

Let me just say that the framemaker bible was a gargantuan ass book and I hated having to search through it for some esoteric feature or setting.

FFwd a few years and we could just find what we needed by searching Infoseek (google search didn't exist yet ... and if you ask me, Infoseek was better than Google is now in some respects).
 
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