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(The Stack)   If you type by hunt-and-peck, it may stand against you one of these days   (thestack.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, safe child-only environments, relatively small input, Neural network, minimum successful deception, neural network models, high success rate, MATLAB test implementations, Middle East Technical  
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2415 clicks; posted to Fandom » on 02 Feb 2016 at 10:49 AM (5 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2016-02-02 9:36:44 AM  
How's that expected to work?  Kids these days are touch typing and developing apps by the time they're 9.  When I was 9 I was still drooling over the Atari 2600 and Omnibot in the Consumers Distributing catalogue.
 
2016-02-02 9:49:54 AM  

Psychopusher: How's that expected to work?  Kids these days are touch typing and developing apps by the time they're 9.


Most likely it's not just pure speed, but also other behavioral cues (transitions between words and phrases, use of corrective keys, etc.) that can tell the difference between kids and adults.  Machine learning (with a large enough sample) can pick up on very subtle patterns, and it may be impossible for the average adult to truly type "like" an average child.

That being said, I'm sure someone would be able to hack it, and send the keystrokes through a filter to mask it, but it's still an interesting idea.
 
2016-02-02 9:55:28 AM  
I've been a programmer on and off for 15 years and I still hunt and peck.
 
2016-02-02 10:17:51 AM  
You sound hot.  What are you wearing?

Pampers.
 
2016-02-02 10:33:06 AM  
I learned to type because as a sophomore in high school I realized that the business track had a LOT of the cheerleaders in it. I took a typing class to watch the cheerleaders in their skirts on game days. In addition to cheap thrills, I also developed a valuable skill.
 
2016-02-02 10:56:21 AM  
So I'll be able to tell if it really is a 15 year old girl I'm chatting with instead of a cop?
 
2016-02-02 10:56:40 AM  
I hunt and peck. I use my right index finger and left middle finger to type though, instead of the usual both index fingers. I learned how to type "correctly" but it was easier and much faster for me to type this way so I didn't keep up with it. I can get around 90-100 wpm, correct capitalization and punctuation.
 
2016-02-02 10:57:26 AM  

Etchy333: Most likely it's not just pure speed, but also other behavioral cues (transitions between words and phrases, use of corrective keys, etc.) that can tell the difference between kids and adults. Machine learning (with a large enough sample) can pick up on very subtle patterns, and it may be impossible for the average adult to truly type "like" an average child.

That being said, I'm sure someone would be able to hack it, and send the keystrokes through a filter to mask it, but it's still an interesting idea.


It's hard to tell from the little information they give but given the image of the table they post it seems like, at least in part, they're trying to determine the number of errors resulting from insufficient key travel -- smaller hands/fingers having to travel further to reach neighbouring keys than an adult's resulting in accidental glancing keypresses of neighbouring keys.  I couldn't really tell what other heuristics they were using here but that definitely seems a part of it.  I suppose I could see that, but it also seems like the older the child is, the less frequently this will happen, both due to growing hands/fingers and more practise.

I suppose if they have a sizeable enough list of metrics to measure they could cumulatively tell a kid's typing from an adults, but it'll never be foolproof.  I remember when I ran a BBS way back in the day there was this one kid, 13 years old, spoke and typed like an adult -- possibly better than I did, and I was in my early 20s at this point and had been touch-typing for years.
 
2016-02-02 11:00:40 AM  

Darong27: I hunt and peck. I use my right index finger and left middle finger to type though, instead of the usual both index fingers. I learned how to type "correctly" but it was easier and much faster for me to type this way so I didn't keep up with it. I can get around 90-100 wpm, correct capitalization and punctuation.


That's good to know. Everyone I know makes me feel like a retard when I see them type.
 
2016-02-02 11:01:18 AM  
Those results might change as kids get keyboard experience earlier and earlier in school. My 11 year old does most of her homework assignments on the computer and has CS classes at her math/science GT school. She does so much keyboard work that she types as quickly and confidently as I do (and with fewer mistakes).
 
2016-02-02 11:09:04 AM  
I learned to touch type by spending most of my childhood in darkened basements on IRC.
 
2016-02-02 11:12:38 AM  
I peck, but I know where the keys are, so I peck reasonably fast.
 
2016-02-02 11:14:44 AM  
generalforum.comView Full Size


What Huntin' Peck might look like.
 
2016-02-02 11:19:52 AM  
The researchers suggest that whilst adults have a high success rate in imitating the slower and more hesitant typing of children under 15, analogous data regarding how children use a computer mouse would be likely to make child-imitation significantly more difficult,

Meanwhile in the actual paper:

At the moment, it remains as an open problem whether mouse data can be used to infer the age group of individuals.

Darong27: I hunt and peck. I use my right index finger and left middle finger to type though, instead of the usual both index fingers. I learned how to type "correctly" but it was easier and much faster for me to type this way so I didn't keep up with it. I can get around 90-100 wpm, correct capitalization and punctuation.


Gonna have to call bs on 100 wpm with two fingers...
 
2016-02-02 11:25:17 AM  

dookdookdook: Darong27: I hunt and peck. I use my right index finger and left middle finger to type though, instead of the usual both index fingers. I learned how to type "correctly" but it was easier and much faster for me to type this way so I didn't keep up with it. I can get around 90-100 wpm, correct capitalization and punctuation.

Gonna have to call bs on 100 wpm with two fingers...


For sure. I fly and only hit around 80.
 
2016-02-02 11:33:04 AM  
We had typing as an elective class in 7th grade. IBM Selectric (with the Big Sphere of Death Letters) was our machine. I need to feel the keys underneath my fingers. But I also play piano. You have to feel the keys beneath you or you're lost. There's no time to look at a keyboard to bang the right key.
 
2016-02-02 11:40:37 AM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: We had typing as an elective class in 7th grade. IBM Selectric (with the Big Sphere of Death Letters) was our machine. I need to feel the keys underneath my fingers. But I also play piano. You have to feel the keys beneath you or you're lost. There's no time to look at a keyboard to bang the right key.


Those spheres hurt like hell when you whip them at someone.
 
2016-02-02 12:04:57 PM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: We had typing as an elective class in 7th grade. IBM Selectric (with the Big Sphere of Death Letters) was our machine. I need to feel the keys underneath my fingers. But I also play piano. You have to feel the keys beneath you or you're lost. There's no time to look at a keyboard to bang the right key.


I learned how to type on IBM electric typewriters, and I think that's why I bang the keys so hard on my computer. I didn't notice it until I took my laptop out in public and people started staring at me. I make noise when I'm using it.

But I'm not going to learn how to type different now.
 
2016-02-02 12:07:58 PM  
The typing class I took in high school was the most useful class I ever took.
 
2016-02-02 12:08:29 PM  

Tr0mBoNe: ecmoRandomNumbers: We had typing as an elective class in 7th grade. IBM Selectric (with the Big Sphere of Death Letters) was our machine. I need to feel the keys underneath my fingers. But I also play piano. You have to feel the keys beneath you or you're lost. There's no time to look at a keyboard to bang the right key.

Those spheres hurt like hell when you whip them at someone.


When I took typing in High School (class of '81)  There were 20 Selectrics and 5 manual typewriters.  She made everybody use the manuals once, so they would know what it felt like.  The rest of the time you used the selectrics, unless you were a screw up.  Like the guy in class who was always taking the ball loose so you hit the return key and it launches the ball into the air where it bounced off the ceiling.  He spent most of the semester on a manual typewriter.
 
2016-02-02 12:20:59 PM  
Hunt n Peck ? I use the Seekout n Destroy method
 
2016-02-02 12:20:59 PM  

Mugato: I've been a programmer on and off for 15 years and I still hunt and peck.


WHAT ABOUT YOUR DAILY KLOC!?  KLOC!

i.imgur.comView Full Size
 
2016-02-02 12:22:25 PM  

Psychopusher: How's that expected to work?  Kids these days are touch typing and developing apps by the time they're 9.  When I was 9 I was still drooling over the Atari 2600 and Omnibot in the Consumers Distributing catalogue.


You could presumably do more in determining age group:

Truly ancient: learned on mechanical typewriters.
Fark ancient: learned on weird keyboads like Atari 400/TRS-80 CoCo
old: learned on IBM PC - wordstar
millenial (according to fark) types only with phone keypad. Gets letters via texting methods.
newer kids: Can't type fast due to issues with phone touchscreens
kids from article: who knows.

/had a parent's old mechanical in my room growing up.  Don't think I ever did more than play with it.
//there was no point in touch typing on an Atari 400 (membrane keyboard).  Don't try.
///really learned in a combination of Zork (Atari 800: real keyboard) and high school typing.
 
2016-02-02 12:25:56 PM  

dookdookdook: The researchers suggest that whilst adults have a high success rate in imitating the slower and more hesitant typing of children under 15, analogous data regarding how children use a computer mouse would be likely to make child-imitation significantly more difficult,

Meanwhile in the actual paper:

At the moment, it remains as an open problem whether mouse data can be used to infer the age group of individuals.

Darong27: I hunt and peck. I use my right index finger and left middle finger to type though, instead of the usual both index fingers. I learned how to type "correctly" but it was easier and much faster for me to type this way so I didn't keep up with it. I can get around 90-100 wpm, correct capitalization and punctuation.

Gonna have to call bs on 100 wpm with two fingers...


I would agree with that, several years ago Bob Leavy, a former Post columnist had a contest for two finger typists. I believe the winner (a national contest) was around 65 wpm.  I learned how to type because my father thought every professional person should known how to type.  I started on a Royal manual.  We (4 brothers and sisters) all had to do it.  Two hours of typing practice 5 days a week during the summer.  You had to do it until you got to 65 wpm. Took me two summers.  I got a job as a clerk typist with the Department of the Interior, had a typing and editing business when I was in college, in 1973 jobs were really hard to get, I got one as a legal secretary.  Fark of a lot of typing later age 29 I took a test to get a job and typed 137 on a Selectric (about its limit).  10 years later when computer keyboards came to the world of typing I manage 193 with a few mistakes in a 5 minute test.  I don't have to think about the keys, I just think what I want to say and it comes out without any thinking.  I can be imagining myself on a wave in Hawaii and be typing away quite accurately.  8 hours a day  for 35 years would probably give you a close estimate of the number of hours I've spent typing.  I hate laptop keyboards with a passion.  It's like asking Man o' War to plow the back 40.  You couple the typing with about 35,000 hours of guitar playing over the last 50 years and my hands, in then morning, they be numb.
 
2016-02-02 12:38:28 PM  
Live it.  Learn it.

blogcdn.comView Full Size

41.media.tumblr.comView Full Size

33.media.tumblr.comView Full Size
 
2016-02-02 12:42:42 PM  

MartinD-35: dookdookdook: The researchers suggest that whilst adults have a high success rate in imitating the slower and more hesitant typing of children under 15, analogous data regarding how children use a computer mouse would be likely to make child-imitation significantly more difficult,

Meanwhile in the actual paper:

At the moment, it remains as an open problem whether mouse data can be used to infer the age group of individuals.

Darong27: I hunt and peck. I use my right index finger and left middle finger to type though, instead of the usual both index fingers. I learned how to type "correctly" but it was easier and much faster for me to type this way so I didn't keep up with it. I can get around 90-100 wpm, correct capitalization and punctuation.

Gonna have to call bs on 100 wpm with two fingers...

I would agree with that, several years ago Bob Leavy, a former Post columnist had a contest for two finger typists. I believe the winner (a national contest) was around 65 wpm.  I learned how to type because my father thought every professional person should known how to type.  I started on a Royal manual.  We (4 brothers and sisters) all had to do it.  Two hours of typing practice 5 days a week during the summer.  You had to do it until you got to 65 wpm. Took me two summers.  I got a job as a clerk typist with the Department of the Interior, had a typing and editing business when I was in college, in 1973 jobs were really hard to get, I got one as a legal secretary.  Fark of a lot of typing later age 29 I took a test to get a job and typed 137 on a Selectric (about its limit).  10 years later when computer keyboards came to the world of typing I manage 193 with a few mistakes in a 5 minute test.  I don't have to think about the keys, I just think what I want to say and it comes out without any thinking.  I can be imagining myself on a wave in Hawaii and be typing away quite accurately.  8 hours a day  for 35 years would probably give you a close estimate of the number ...


The one thing that kept me on Macs for so long, was the mechanical keyboard. The tactile difference makes all the difference. The weak response that so many modern keyboards have today makes typing on them like running your fingers over mush. It just feels lazy, and without any impact. That is a subtle difference, but that feeling can transfer to your writing as well. If it feels sort of lackadaisical, it's easy to treat it exactly as such. When I'm looking at a new keyboard, I specifically look for those more rugged boards that actually do spring back, and have a solid heft to the keys. It's not about space--I work at a desk, and I don't clutter it with crap, so a nice solid keyboard, that keeps you hands poised at a good angle, that reinforces good typing habits, and posture, that's something I actively seek. Because it means all the difference in the attitude you take when you begin hitting keys.
 
2016-02-02 12:44:00 PM  
I've been using my own layout the past few days at home (AutoHotkey is cool), so this would mess me up.

img.fark.netView Full Size



 I even know where all of the letters, numbers, and the majority of punctuation is without looking at my cheat sheet, but I still have to think about which finger goes with which letter.

Though maybe they can tell I'm a geek rather than a kid by which typing mistakes I make (I tend to hit p instead of d, going down rather than up with my middle right finger. For some reason, I mess up j and k, too, but that's probably because they are pretty uncommon).
 
2016-02-02 12:54:42 PM  
You will pry "hunt and peck" from my cold dead hands. Home row is for conformists mannnnn. Seriously though, I refused to learn to type the "proper" way. Never felt right to me, I use this weird thee finger hunt and peck thing that allows me to type faster than most people I know that use the home row. I get totally thrown off by ergonomic keyboards because of this though. Every time I try to use one it makes my brain do flips because my muscle memory is all off for the keys.
 
2016-02-02 1:07:55 PM  
thebigfootshow.files.wordpress.comView Full Size


On the internet, no one knows you're a chicken.
 
2016-02-02 1:08:17 PM  
dailydoseoflies.files.wordpress.comView Full Size
 
2016-02-02 1:15:25 PM  
People also expect computer professionals to type fast

If you do hunt & peck, you obviously don't know what you're doing with computers...
 
2016-02-02 1:32:34 PM  
What is this "touch typing" you speak of ?

s15-us2.ixquick.comView Full Size
 
2016-02-02 1:44:13 PM  
improbable.comView Full Size
 
2016-02-02 1:49:22 PM  

Psychopusher: How's that expected to work?  Kids these days are touch typing and developing apps by the time they're 9.  When I was 9 I was still drooling over the Atari 2600 and Omnibot in the Consumers Distributing catalogue.


There's a thought. Compare the technology in the Atari 2600 to the current generation of consoles. There's a huge difference in power. Overwhelming. Now turn to the Omnibot.

Show me a more advanced robot on the market today. Or even one that is as sophisticated as the Omnibot, I can't find one.
 
2016-02-02 1:57:46 PM  

hubiestubert: MartinD-35: dookdookdook: The researchers suggest that whilst adults have a high success rate in imitating the slower and more hesitant typing of children under 15, analogous data regarding how children use a computer mouse would be likely to make child-imitation significantly more difficult,

Meanwhile in the actual paper:

At the moment, it remains as an open problem whether mouse data can be used to infer the age group of individuals.

Darong27: I hunt and peck. I use my right index finger and left middle finger to type though, instead of the usual both index fingers. I learned how to type "correctly" but it was easier and much faster for me to type this way so I didn't keep up with it. I can get around 90-100 wpm, correct capitalization and punctuation.

Gonna have to call bs on 100 wpm with two fingers...

I would agree with that, several years ago Bob Leavy, a former Post columnist had a contest for two finger typists. I believe the winner (a national contest) was around 65 wpm.  I learned how to type because my father thought every professional person should known how to type.  I started on a Royal manual.  We (4 brothers and sisters) all had to do it.  Two hours of typing practice 5 days a week during the summer.  You had to do it until you got to 65 wpm. Took me two summers.  I got a job as a clerk typist with the Department of the Interior, had a typing and editing business when I was in college, in 1973 jobs were really hard to get, I got one as a legal secretary.  Fark of a lot of typing later age 29 I took a test to get a job and typed 137 on a Selectric (about its limit).  10 years later when computer keyboards came to the world of typing I manage 193 with a few mistakes in a 5 minute test.  I don't have to think about the keys, I just think what I want to say and it comes out without any thinking.  I can be imagining myself on a wave in Hawaii and be typing away quite accurately.  8 hours a day  for 35 years would probably give you a close estimate of ...


Totally agree.  With proper resistance on the keys you don't make errors.
 
2016-02-02 2:08:52 PM  

RankStranger: Hunt n Peck ? I use the Seekout n Destroy method


What fans of the Seek and Destroy method might look like:

puremix.netView Full Size
 
2016-02-02 2:18:03 PM  

efgeise: RankStranger: Hunt n Peck ? I use the Seekout n Destroy method

What fans of the Seek and Destroy method might look like:

[www.puremix.net image 625x417]


They all look so cheerful for a metal band. Except Lars, that for some reason can't get this weird word "Napster" out of his head.
 
2016-02-02 2:30:13 PM  
I had already been typing for a number of years before I reached a grade that taught touch typing as an elective, so I was already ruined.  However, my hunt-and-peck style eventually morphed into five finger typing.  I mainly use my index and middle fingers to type, hitting the space bar with my right thumb.  I average about 50 to 60 WPM if I really push myself, although my accuracy suffers the faster I push myself.

I also noticed that as I have gotten older, I drop entire words from my line of thought as I type.  My mind races to the next word before my fingers get a chance to type them out.  That's not really a typing issue but rather a typist issue.
 
2016-02-02 3:00:36 PM  

Psychopusher: Kids these days are touch typing and developing apps by the time they're 9.


24.media.tumblr.comView Full Size
 
2016-02-02 4:02:33 PM  

Dinjiin: I had already been typing for a number of years before I reached a grade that taught touch typing as an elective, so I was already ruined.  However, my hunt-and-peck style eventually morphed into five finger typing.  I mainly use my index and middle fingers to type, hitting the space bar with my right thumb.  I average about 50 to 60 WPM if I really push myself, although my accuracy suffers the faster I push myself.

I also noticed that as I have gotten older, I drop entire words from my line of thought as I type.  My mind races to the next word before my fingers get a chance to type them out.  That's not really a typing issue but rather a typist issue.


I have a similar problem. I frequently drop verbs from my sentences when I'm typing, especially when texting.
 
2016-02-02 4:13:25 PM  

hubiestubert: MartinD-35: dookdookdook: The researchers suggest that whilst adults have a high success rate in imitating the slower and more hesitant typing of children under 15, analogous data regarding how children use a computer mouse would be likely to make child-imitation significantly more difficult,

Meanwhile in the actual paper:

At the moment, it remains as an open problem whether mouse data can be used to infer the age group of individuals.

Darong27: I hunt and peck. I use my right index finger and left middle finger to type though, instead of the usual both index fingers. I learned how to type "correctly" but it was easier and much faster for me to type this way so I didn't keep up with it. I can get around 90-100 wpm, correct capitalization and punctuation.

Gonna have to call bs on 100 wpm with two fingers...

I would agree with that, several years ago Bob Leavy, a former Post columnist had a contest for two finger typists. I believe the winner (a national contest) was around 65 wpm.  I learned how to type because my father thought every professional person should known how to type.  I started on a Royal manual.  We (4 brothers and sisters) all had to do it.  Two hours of typing practice 5 days a week during the summer.  You had to do it until you got to 65 wpm. Took me two summers.  I got a job as a clerk typist with the Department of the Interior, had a typing and editing business when I was in college, in 1973 jobs were really hard to get, I got one as a legal secretary.  Fark of a lot of typing later age 29 I took a test to get a job and typed 137 on a Selectric (about its limit).  10 years later when computer keyboards came to the world of typing I manage 193 with a few mistakes in a 5 minute test.  I don't have to think about the keys, I just think what I want to say and it comes out without any thinking.  I can be imagining myself on a wave in Hawaii and be typing away quite accurately.  8 hours a day  for 35 years would probably give you a close estimate of the number ...

The one thing that kept me on Macs for so long, was the mechanical keyboard. The tactile difference makes all the difference. The weak response that so many modern keyboards have today makes typing on them like running your fingers over mush. It just feels lazy, and without any impact. That is a subtle difference, but that feeling can transfer to your writing as well. If it feels sort of lackadaisical, it's easy to treat it exactly as such. When I'm looking at a new keyboard, I specifically look for those more rugged boards that actually do spring back, and have a solid heft to the keys. It's not about space--I work at a desk, and I don't clutter it with crap, so a nice solid keyboard, that keeps you hands poised at a good angle, that reinforces good typing habits, and posture, that's something I actively seek. Because it means all the difference in the attitude you take when you begin hitting keys.


There are tons of good mechanical keyboards out there. They are mostly labeled as gaming keyboards. The critical components are the type of switches they use under the keys.

http://www.keyboardco.com/blog/index.php/2012/12/an-introduction-to-c​h​erry-mx-mechanical-switches/

My current ride is a Logitech G910. Logitech uses their own proprietary switches instead of cherry.

And I can generally pick out age and/or gender based on text chat communication in my MMO games. It helps that there are no girls on the Internet.

/Fully half of my WoW guild back in the day was female.
 
2016-02-02 4:43:29 PM  

hubiestubert: MartinD-35: dookdookdook: The researchers suggest that whilst adults have a high success rate in imitating the slower and more hesitant typing of children under 15, analogous data regarding how children use a computer mouse would be likely to make child-imitation significantly more difficult,

Meanwhile in the actual paper:

At the moment, it remains as an open problem whether mouse data can be used to infer the age group of individuals.

Darong27: I hunt and peck. I use my right index finger and left middle finger to type though, instead of the usual both index fingers. I learned how to type "correctly" but it was easier and much faster for me to type this way so I didn't keep up with it. I can get around 90-100 wpm, correct capitalization and punctuation.

Gonna have to call bs on 100 wpm with two fingers...

I would agree with that, several years ago Bob Leavy, a former Post columnist had a contest for two finger typists. I believe the winner (a national contest) was around 65 wpm.  I learned how to type because my father thought every professional person should known how to type.  I started on a Royal manual.  We (4 brothers and sisters) all had to do it.  Two hours of typing practice 5 days a week during the summer.  You had to do it until you got to 65 wpm. Took me two summers.  I got a job as a clerk typist with the Department of the Interior, had a typing and editing business when I was in college, in 1973 jobs were really hard to get, I got one as a legal secretary.  Fark of a lot of typing later age 29 I took a test to get a job and typed 137 on a Selectric (about its limit).  10 years later when computer keyboards came to the world of typing I manage 193 with a few mistakes in a 5 minute test.  I don't have to think about the keys, I just think what I want to say and it comes out without any thinking.  I can be imagining myself on a wave in Hawaii and be typing away quite accurately.  8 hours a day  for 35 years would probably give you a close estimate of ...


Have not tried one myself, due to price point. But I have heard great reviews on http://www.daskeyboard.com/ I may find a way to try one sometime, they look nice.
 
2016-02-02 6:41:52 PM  

Tr0mBoNe: I learned to touch type by spending most of my childhood in darkened basements on IRC.


mushes for me... good way to learn to type quickly... having to type faster than the monster trying to kill you.
 
2016-02-02 8:11:04 PM  

Boudyro: hubiestubert: The one thing that kept me on Macs for so long, was the mechanical keyboard. The tactile difference makes all the difference. The weak response that so many modern keyboards have today makes typing on them like running your fingers over mush. It just feels lazy, and without any impact. That is a subtle difference, but that feeling can transfer to your writing as well. If it feels sort of lackadaisical, it's easy to treat it exactly as such. When I'm looking at a new keyboard, I specifically look for those more rugged boards that actually do spring back, and have a solid heft to the keys. It's not about space--I work at a desk, and I don't clutter it with crap, so a nice solid keyboard, that keeps you hands poised at a good angle, that reinforces good typing habits, and posture, that's something I actively seek. Because it means all the difference in the attitude you take when you begin hitting keys.

There are tons of good mechanical keyboards out there. They are mostly labeled as gaming keyboards. The critical components are the type of switches they use under the keys.


As a five-key typist, I found that mechanical keyboards stress my hands too much after an 8+ hour day.  I personally use a high-end dome switch keyboard from a DEC Alpha workstation that I've had since '99.  HP sells a USB version of it today that feels very similar.  Maybe there is a mechanical keyboard with soft enough switches, but I haven't found any in person that I could play with to see if I like them.  Any suggestions?
 
2016-02-02 8:37:23 PM  

Dinjiin: Boudyro: hubiestubert: The one thing that kept me on Macs for so long, was the mechanical keyboard. The tactile difference makes all the difference. The weak response that so many modern keyboards have today makes typing on them like running your fingers over mush. It just feels lazy, and without any impact. That is a subtle difference, but that feeling can transfer to your writing as well. If it feels sort of lackadaisical, it's easy to treat it exactly as such. When I'm looking at a new keyboard, I specifically look for those more rugged boards that actually do spring back, and have a solid heft to the keys. It's not about space--I work at a desk, and I don't clutter it with crap, so a nice solid keyboard, that keeps you hands poised at a good angle, that reinforces good typing habits, and posture, that's something I actively seek. Because it means all the difference in the attitude you take when you begin hitting keys.

There are tons of good mechanical keyboards out there. They are mostly labeled as gaming keyboards. The critical components are the type of switches they use under the keys.

As a five-key typist, I found that mechanical keyboards stress my hands too much after an 8+ hour day.  I personally use a high-end dome switch keyboard from a DEC Alpha workstation that I've had since '99.  HP sells a USB version of it today that feels very similar.  Maybe there is a mechanical keyboard with soft enough switches, but I haven't found any in person that I could play with to see if I like them.  Any suggestions?


Look over that Cherry MX switches link I posted. I forget what color Is what, but the color of each Cherry switch defines its firmness.

Part of why I went with the Logitech was I really liked the keystroke feel.
The particular one I got is spendy and has a lot of bells and whistles you may not have any interest in though.

I have friends who swear by Ducky keyboards and they offer a choice of switches. They were on my short list last time I was buying.
 
2016-02-02 9:10:42 PM  

Dinjiin: Boudyro: hubiestubert: The one thing that kept me on Macs for so long, was the mechanical keyboard. The tactile difference makes all the difference. The weak response that so many modern keyboards have today makes typing on them like running your fingers over mush. It just feels lazy, and without any impact. That is a subtle difference, but that feeling can transfer to your writing as well. If it feels sort of lackadaisical, it's easy to treat it exactly as such. When I'm looking at a new keyboard, I specifically look for those more rugged boards that actually do spring back, and have a solid heft to the keys. It's not about space--I work at a desk, and I don't clutter it with crap, so a nice solid keyboard, that keeps you hands poised at a good angle, that reinforces good typing habits, and posture, that's something I actively seek. Because it means all the difference in the attitude you take when you begin hitting keys.

There are tons of good mechanical keyboards out there. They are mostly labeled as gaming keyboards. The critical components are the type of switches they use under the keys.

As a five-key typist, I found that mechanical keyboards stress my hands too much after an 8+ hour day.  I personally use a high-end dome switch keyboard from a DEC Alpha workstation that I've had since '99.  HP sells a USB version of it today that feels very similar.  Maybe there is a mechanical keyboard with soft enough switches, but I haven't found any in person that I could play with to see if I like them.  Any suggestions?



If you want soft switches, Cherry MX reds are pretty light.
deskthority.netView Full Size
deskthority.netView Full Size

They are linear, though (no tactile feedback). I prefer browns, which are a tiny bit heavier and have a light bump.

deskthority.netView Full Size
deskthority.netView Full Size


I have heard good things about Gaterons (which clone many of the same features of Cherry switches). The "GATERON white shaft" is even lighter than Cherry MX reds. I haven't tried them, though. I am more of a buckling springs guy, though I like Cherry switches, too.

Finally, at the pricey end of the spectrum, Topre is supposed to be the king of the rubberdome-feel switch.

deskthority.netView Full Size


A good place to start research on keyboards (if you haven't already) is Geekhack.
 
2016-02-02 10:06:46 PM  
I'm self-taught and can do around 50 wpm on a normal keyboard (WAY less on mobile), but it looks like a complete mess when I type. My little fingers don't do letters at all, they're just there for the right and left columns (shift, tab, enter, backspace, etc). The bottom bar is all thumbs, and my right hand takes care of the right 2/3 of the letter keys.

It looks bad, but it works for me.
 
2016-02-02 11:27:00 PM  

Mugato: I've been a programmer on and off for 15 years and I still hunt and peck.


I once was asked to take a typing test for a programmer job (along with some sort of aptitude test).

This was in the '80s - I believe the thinking was that if you couldn't type worth a crap you probably hadn't spent enough time in front of a keyboard to be a decent programmer.

That's the only time I've taken a typing test since typing class in junior high.  I didn't learn shiat in typing class either.  I learned to type from sitting in front of keyboards hooked up to monochrome monitors.
 
2016-02-02 11:46:13 PM  

Jgok: I'm self-taught and can do around 50 wpm on a normal keyboard (WAY less on mobile), but it looks like a complete mess when I type. My little fingers don't do letters at all, they're just there for the right and left columns (shift, tab, enter, backspace, etc). The bottom bar is all thumbs, and my right hand takes care of the right 2/3 of the letter keys.

It looks bad, but it works for me.


50 wpm? Jebus...that is like half the fail speed from high school. I had to do 110 wpm just to get out of that class. Then again, Texas does sort of stack the deck I suppose for its folks. And the sad thing? I'm a dang sight faster than I was back then, and I'm in my middling years nowadays, and I'm supposed to be declining. Typing is a skill, and the right skill set to train with makes all the difference. The only thing the thumbs do is hit the damn space bar.

Seriously folks: how in the Hells do you manage this crap? I'm frippin' into my third drink and I'm STILL typing fair well, and that is with Sin City and Jessica Elba in the background...
 
2016-02-02 11:48:07 PM  
Alba. Dammit. That's gin #3 doing it's Debbil work...

And even as I hit "Enter" I KNEW I'd made the typo...
 
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