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(The Stack)   On-chip liquid cooling means no fan noise, no heat burning your lap. Negatively, you won't know when a web-page has loaded a Flash ad   (thestack.com) divider line
    More: Cool, heat sinks, Densely Integrated Electronic Systems, Embedded Cooling Technologies, disruptive technology, programmable gate array, Georgia Institute of Technology, DARPA, CPUs  
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2353 clicks; posted to Fandom » on 05 Oct 2015 at 3:21 PM (5 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



17 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2015-10-05 2:00:55 PM  
What cool CHiPs might look like:

pics.imcdb.orgView Full Size
 
2015-10-05 2:38:02 PM  

Sin_City_Superhero: What cool CHiPs might look like:

[pics.imcdb.org image 715x477]



Poncherello was the only cool one.
 
2015-10-05 3:32:23 PM  
The answer is "Never, because that bloated piece of sheiat is disabled".
 
2015-10-05 3:37:40 PM  
Subby, there is still heat and a heat sink. The heat sink is the liquid and that heat still needs to be radiated out somewhere.
 
2015-10-05 3:52:28 PM  
s3.postimg.orgView Full Size
 
2015-10-05 4:01:49 PM  
Funny, I know when a page is loaded with flash because I see grey boxes everywhere saying "Hey, you need to click here to run this garbage".
 
2015-10-05 4:21:48 PM  
Noscript, no ads ever.
 
2015-10-05 5:44:01 PM  
Yummmm... liquid cooling...

There are two things I'll never not have in the PC's I build from now on, since I tried them in recent years: SSD boot drives and liquid cooling. An SSD boot drive increases boot up time so very much that I find it indispensable now, and a nice closed loop CPU cooler does such a good job at so little noise that I don't think I can ever go back to air cooled. Both of those things are pretty affordable these days too.

You can get a 120 gb SSD for under $50 now, and a decent closed loop cooling system for $50 - $80.

Building it in to the chip itself sounds interesting... I'm assuming it means you get to make the associated cooling rig smaller.
 
2015-10-05 6:04:50 PM  
 
2015-10-05 6:14:09 PM  

Gordon Bennett: Flash is great!


made it as far as Chinese food, then flash crashed my browser.

not going back.
 
2015-10-05 10:09:30 PM  
Sounds to me like they're talking about building a miniaturized version of a heat pipe cooling system directly into the chip. If I'm reading this right, you'll still have your choice of water or air for getting the heat out of the device, but the chip itself will be much more efficient at transferring heat to the heat sink, so we might be able to get away with smaller radiators for the same performance level.
 
2015-10-05 11:09:06 PM  
What a Flash ad might look like:
d.ibtimes.co.ukView Full Size
 
2015-10-06 1:25:47 AM  
On-chip liquid cooling also opens up the possibility for a new level of compactness in device design, which frequently has to leverage available surface space for dissipation purposes, often to the alarm of the end user.

Wut?
 
2015-10-06 2:06:03 AM  

Voodoo_Stu: What a Flash ad might look like:
[d.ibtimes.co.uk image 736x736]


Shut up, Iris!

/hope she improves this season with the timelines all skewed.
 
2015-10-06 4:45:30 AM  
The group successfully developed a standard demonstration test, including one for DARPA officials, in which a converted FPGA with bespoke Altera-supplied architecture operated, with no other cooling, at less than 24 degrees Celsius, and was compared to an analogous air-cooled device operating at 60 degrees Celsius.

No other cooling involved, just the on-board coolant with a temperature drop of 36 Degrees compared to standard air cooling tech.

Okay, that's pretty something right there. I'm impressed.
 
2015-10-06 5:24:50 AM  
Ads have all but ruined Internet video.

This isn't TV, folks.
 
2015-10-06 11:08:12 AM  

BarkingUnicorn: On-chip liquid cooling also opens up the possibility for a new level of compactness in device design, which frequently has to leverage available surface space for dissipation purposes, often to the alarm of the end user.

Wut?


I believe that they are referring to the use of device cases as heat sinks. Users can become concerned because it seems like the device is overheating even though it's just dissipating heat normally. However I'm not really sure where they plan on dissipating the heat if not for the case.
 
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