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(WTSP)   Protip: Never use gasoline to start bonfires   (wtsp.com) divider line
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4637 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Nov 2014 at 9:43 AM (6 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2014-11-16 9:13:43 AM  
It works very well actually. The key is to move the can, even if you think it's empty, well away from the fire pit before ignition. It also gives the gas a chance to kind of soak into the material making for a more effective, if less exciting start. Road flares are cheap and safe, and if you're a boater you probably have expired ones laying around that work but won't pass an inspection.
 
2014-11-16 9:45:14 AM  
why
 
2014-11-16 9:48:13 AM  
More appropriate headliens:

Protip: Don't stand next to a gas can when near a fire
Protip: Don't leave a gas can near a fire
Protip: If you live in Florida, expect the worst thing to happen all the time
Protip: If it's your first time building a fire, don't bring a 12-yr old
 
2014-11-16 9:49:08 AM  
Were they cooking brontosaurus burgers?

/Uncle Gus
 
2014-11-16 9:49:30 AM  
I grew up in a redneck small town, and one of my childhood friend's dads would light bonfires by muzzle loading a match into a BB gun.  A concrete block in the middle of the brush would be the target, the gas would make it poof up.  He wouldn't let anyone be close when he shot it, though.
 
2014-11-16 9:50:05 AM  
Use diesel. That's what my dad uses when we burn slash piles. Works pretty well, too. Sometimes he crumples up a few newspapers and douses them as well as the brush before he lights it, if it's cold or damp.

Then again, he uses diesel in his tractor and carries a spare can of it, so it's handy.
 
2014-11-16 9:50:39 AM  
My optometrist can attest to that. One would think someone so smart would have enough sense not to throw gasoline on a fire and one would be wrong. Nearly lost one of his ears and is permanently disfigured from burns.
 
2014-11-16 9:51:24 AM  
Yeah, everyone knows you're better off with diesel.
 
2014-11-16 9:51:48 AM  

MutantMotherMouse: My optometrist can attest to that. One would think someone so smart would have enough sense not to throw gasoline on a fire and one would be wrong. Nearly lost one of his ears and is permanently disfigured from burns.



Pessimists live longer.
 
2014-11-16 9:54:03 AM  

Snarfangel: Use diesel. That's what my dad uses when we burn slash piles. Works pretty well, too. Sometimes he crumples up a few newspapers and douses them as well as the brush before he lights it, if it's cold or damp.

Then again, he uses diesel in his tractor and carries a spare can of it, so it's handy.


Pretty much. Gas is designed to go up very quickly. Unless you use a LOT or have extremely dry kindling, it's mostly a waste.

Newspaper, pine needles, and especially dryer lint/sheets are great fuel supplies.
 
2014-11-16 9:54:59 AM  
I use gas all the time,.. trick is to mix it 50/50 with used motor oil. it will not flash and it burns a lot longer.
 
2014-11-16 9:56:13 AM  
My heart goes out to her family. She shouldn't have been left unattended.
 
2014-11-16 9:58:19 AM  
A pit fire is not a bonfire, but whatever, this is Fark.
 
2014-11-16 9:58:48 AM  
It works fine. I've used it. The key is you only need like a tablespoon and lots of small kindling.

Also
"There has to be water on the site at all times"
I'm pretty sure throwing water on a gasoline fire is a bad idea.
 
2014-11-16 10:02:42 AM  
Napalm, always use napalm.
 
2014-11-16 10:04:09 AM  

abhorrent1: It works fine. I've used it. The key is you only need like a tablespoon and lots of small kindling.

Also
"There has to be water on the site at all times"
I'm pretty sure throwing water on a gasoline fire is a bad idea.


Ftfy
 
2014-11-16 10:04:41 AM  

abhorrent1: It works fine. I've used it. The key is you only need like a tablespoon and lots of small kindling.

Also
"There has to be water on the site at all times"
I'm pretty sure throwing water on a gasoline fire is a bad idea.


it could electrocute you or boil over
 
2014-11-16 10:08:44 AM  
 WD-40 and a lighter is always fun.
 
2014-11-16 10:11:56 AM  

StrikitRich: A pit fire is not a bonfire, but whatever, this is Fark.


I love how people can be pedantic about anything. It warms my cockles.
 
2014-11-16 10:12:17 AM  
Just spent the weekend throwing magnesium plates into a bon fire. Somebody that worked in a printing place that just closed down brought some. Great fun.

Also... I don't always use gas to start a fire... but when I do, I do it for the wooomph effect.

/better than tv
 
2014-11-16 10:16:19 AM  

megarian: StrikitRich: A pit fire is not a bonfire, but whatever, this is Fark.

I love how people can be pedantic about anything. It warms my cockles.


maybe below the cockles, maybe in the sub-cockle area, maybe in the liver
maybe in the kidneys, maybe even in the colon, we don't know
 
2014-11-16 10:16:59 AM  

OregonVet: It works very well actually. The key is to move the can, even if you think it's empty, well away from the fire pit before ignition. It also gives the gas a chance to kind of soak into the material making for a more effective, if less exciting start. Road flares are cheap and safe, and if you're a boater you probably have expired ones laying around that work but won't pass an inspection.


Yeee, let it sit so it can evaporate into vapor and collect in the air pockets between the logs and stuff, pls take video.
 
2014-11-16 10:26:50 AM  
As someone who occasionally works in a burn unit, I can tell you that gasoline and bonfires are one of the leading causes of major, often life-threatening burns. Often it's some idiot throwing gas on a fire that's already lit, which will cause a huge fireball, and often it's bystanders as well as the thrower who get burned. Diesel is much safer to use.
 
2014-11-16 10:28:19 AM  

theknuckler_33: megarian: StrikitRich: A pit fire is not a bonfire, but whatever, this is Fark.

I love how people can be pedantic about anything. It warms my cockles.

maybe below the cockles, maybe in the sub-cockle area, maybe in the liver
maybe in the kidneys, maybe even in the colon, we don't know


The undercarriage?
 
2014-11-16 10:31:09 AM  

haywatchthis: abhorrent1: It works fine. I've used it. The key is you only need like a tablespoon and lots of small kindling.

Also
"There has to be water on the site at all times"
I'm pretty sure throwing water on a gasoline fire is a bad idea.

it could electrocute you or boil over


I'm not even sure what this means.
 
2014-11-16 10:33:38 AM  

skinink: Were they cooking brontosaurus burgers?

/Uncle Gus


"Hello, I'm Bunny. Goonie Goo Goo."
 
2014-11-16 10:40:28 AM  
I use a gas can to light a bon fire every other night. Common sense says I don't light the farking bon fire until said gas can is far away, also I don't have a bon fire under power lines; unlike my neighbors who melted away their electric lines which set the pole on fire and caused it to fall and squash their double wide, its now a single wide with an addition, but since everyones an expert handyman in florida - expect them to use Duct tape and some plywood to fix it.
Long as it doesn't fark up the signal on the console so they can watch the Nascar race; its fixed!
 
2014-11-16 10:46:16 AM  
Doesn't believe it's even possible to start a fire without gasoline:
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2014-11-16 10:58:02 AM  
Paper towels and canola oil work well too. Don't ya all know we are trying to wean ourselves off foreign oil products?
 
2014-11-16 11:06:11 AM  

megarian: StrikitRich: A pit fire is not a bonfire, but whatever, this is Fark.

I love how people can be pedantic about anything. It warms my cockles.



Cockles are warmed better by convection ovens.
 
2014-11-16 11:12:00 AM  

Snarfangel: megarian: StrikitRich: A pit fire is not a bonfire, but whatever, this is Fark.

I love how people can be pedantic about anything. It warms my cockles.


Cockles are warmed better by convection ovens.


And gasoline fires.
 
2014-11-16 11:36:44 AM  
If you actually bother to learn how to start a fire, no accelerant is necessary.  Amateurs and thrill seekers keep emergency rooms in business.
 
2014-11-16 12:06:37 PM  
Liquid gasoline is not flammable... Its fumes absolutely are though.

Liquid diesel is flammable. Its fumes are not.

Thus, the latter is a far wiser choice for starting a bonfire. Unless you can ignite the gasoline from a distance, in which case the explosion is awesome.

Protip: when trying to start a fire on a windy beach, dig a pit as you normally would and find an empty beer can. Remove the top of the can with a can opener (P-38's are great for this reason - always keep one in your glove box) and fill the can 3/4 full with gasoline. The fumes in the remaining headspace will burn like a candle for several hours, making lighting the fire a breeze. Just stick it in the middle of the pit and start building.

Also, once it's going, throwing logs onto the fire causes the gas to splash and make big fireballs. Tons of fun.
 
2014-11-16 12:13:22 PM  

theknuckler_33: megarian: StrikitRich: A pit fire is not a bonfire, but whatever, this is Fark.

I love how people can be pedantic about anything. It warms my cockles.

maybe below the cockles, maybe in the sub-cockle area, maybe in the liver
maybe in the kidneys, maybe even in the colon, we don't know


/+1
 
2014-11-16 12:22:14 PM  
"gasoline is obviously not one of the better fuels to use. It flashes," he said. "There has to be water on the site at all times, and someone attending to the fire at all times. And if we do that, tragedies like this can be avoided."

Yeah and not leaving the can next to the firepit would help too. farking morons...
 
2014-11-16 12:41:45 PM  

Saluki222: If you actually bother to learn how to start a fire, no accelerant is necessary.  Amateurs and thrill seekers keep emergency rooms in business.


Unless you have damp wood and only around a half hour until dark, I'd agree with you.  When you're pressed for time, gas is just fine if you let it soak for a minute or two and light the fire from a distance.  I normally pour a maybe and 1/8 of a cup tops of gas onto the end of a decent dog throwing stick and lob that into the soaking logs.  I've never had anybody hurt at one of my fires, but I'm also a pyro and my Dad was letting me do the camping fires since I was 9 or 10.

On my last camping trip, I showed my buddy's son, who was 16, how to start a fire without gas and such and with using only a single match on the fire for the entire trip.  When he asked me why I build fires like that, I said "Anybody can start a fire with gas and stuff like that, but it takes a bit of skill to start a fire with only a single match, and being able to start a fire with the bare minimum that you have is a skill that can save your life if you're ever lost, stranded somewhere, you have no electricity in winter, and shiat like that."  He also thought it was pretty neat how I started the cooking fire the next day by just gathering up some pine needles and twigs and just blowing on the coals for a minute and said "My Dad would have just thrown gas on it, but your way is a lot funner."  "Well, your Dad wastes shiat and I'd rather save my gas for the generator or emergencies."

Ghetto napalm works pretty good as a fire starter too -- take a stick, about a half gallon of gas, and a lot of styrofoam.  Add styrofoam to gas, stir with stick, repeat until its a really sticky goopy substance called ghetto napalm.  Note that this stuff is really dangerous and will burn underwater, but damn is it fun.
 
2014-11-16 12:58:35 PM  

my lip balm addiction: "gasoline is obviously not one of the better fuels to use. It flashes," he said. "There has to be water on the site at all times, and someone attending to the fire at all times. And if we do that, tragedies like this can be avoided."

Yeah and not leaving the can next to the firepit would help too. farking morons...


My rule is move the gas can at least 10 to 15 feet away from the point where you don't feel heat from the fire.  I hardly ever have water or fire extinguishers on site when I burn, but, then again, I'm very safe about burning stuff and only allow people that I know will be safe about it to mess with my fires.  I've never had any burns, injuries, or out of control fires occur from one of my controlled fires, but I'm cautious about burning things and I've been taught a lot from woodsmen, hunters, and rednecks* when I was growing up....then again, the 10yo is the least likely of the group to be drunk at 3am and the sober person should be the one manning the fire...is the main reason I was taught to do the fires.  I'll be 30 in a few weeks and I'm still the sober one in the middle of the night doing the fires.  Can't blame my Dad on that one....he hasn't had to deal with the fires for 20 years, other than getting and helping me load the wood before I could drive...

*they gave good examples of what not to do...like pouring gas directly onto a fire from the gas can or lighting gas soaked logs with a lighter...
 
2014-11-16 12:59:40 PM  
This just happened a few towns away from me.

http://www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/2014/11/16/brothers-wo u nded-massachusetts-bonfire/20hxL2BftTXpJVJUVg0pBO/story.html?p1=Topofp age:sub_headline_2
 
2014-11-16 1:12:06 PM  

SnowPeas: I use gas all the time,.. trick is to mix it 50/50 with used motor oil. it will not flash and it burns a lot longer.


that is how i get rid of my used oil, it is much easier than putting it in a jug a walk to the curb
the trick to getting away with it is to do it during the day and blame diesel trucks/cars.
anybody could do it at night with those tiki lamps, but that takes the skill out of it.
 
2014-11-16 1:13:38 PM  
LOX or go home...

bkinzel.deView Full Size

(Linked from a Geocities-looking gif page from the late 90's that will probably seize after 50 loads...)
 
2014-11-16 1:22:53 PM  
 
2014-11-16 1:42:31 PM  
When  I start my fire for honoring Earth Day, I normally use an old tire that was soaked in waste solvent and stuffed with plastic.
 
2014-11-16 2:09:22 PM  

StrikitRich: A pit fire is not a bonfire, but whatever, this is Fark.


What the Fark is a Bon, and why set it on fire?
 
2014-11-16 2:33:01 PM  
Vaseline soaked cotton balls. My fire starter of choice.
 
2014-11-16 2:35:18 PM  

megarian: StrikitRich: A pit fire is not a bonfire, but whatever, this is Fark.

I love how people can be pedantic about anything. It warms my cockles.


what a cockle might look like:

assaultweapon.infoView Full Size
 
2014-11-16 3:25:03 PM  

skeevy420: Ghetto napalm works pretty good as a fire starter too -- take a stick, about a half gallon of gas, and a lot of styrofoam. Add styrofoam to gas, stir with stick, repeat until its a really sticky goopy substance called ghetto napalm. Note that this stuff is really dangerous and will burn underwater, but damn is it fun.


I am so trying that.
 
2014-11-16 3:57:23 PM  

Whatchoo Talkinbout: Napalm, always use napalm.


Our foresters use a mix of saw gas (oil/gasoline mix) and soap.  They call it BLM Napalm.
 
2014-11-16 5:15:38 PM  

KidneyStone: upndn: Just spent the weekend throwing magnesium plates into a bon fire. Somebody that worked in a printing place that just closed down brought some. Great fun.

Also... I don't always use gas to start a fire... but when I do, I do it for the wooomph effect.

/better than tv

Yep, the whoomp is half the fun


Well, there it is.
 
2014-11-16 5:28:00 PM  

Hobo Kicker: Often it's some idiot throwing gas on a fire that's already lit, which will cause a huge fireball


My brother nearly got burned that way.  Lost a few hairs on his knuckles  I think.  Fortunately he didn't use a whole can, just a fence caps worth.  He was a scout.  He'd been around fire his whole life and he still was dumb enough to do that.
 
2014-11-16 5:42:35 PM  

HoratioGates: Hobo Kicker: Often it's some idiot throwing gas on a fire that's already lit, which will cause a huge fireball

My brother nearly got burned that way.  Lost a few hairs on his knuckles  I think.  Fortunately he didn't use a whole can, just a fence caps worth.  He was a scout.  He'd been around fire his whole life and he still was dumb enough to do that.


I've had a few close calls as well.  Mainly with lighting gas grills and even a wood burning stove with lighter fluid.  Had my arm hairs singed off a few times.   But being severely burned is something i definitely want to avoid.
 
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