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(Primer Magazine)   Common words that when you say them make people think you're from Alabama   ( primermagazine.com) divider line
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26806 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Apr 2013 at 1:00 PM (5 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



380 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-04-18 12:43:00 PM  
OFTEN
Incorrect pronunciation: off - ten

Correct pronunciation: off - en

 Oh, I'm not going along with this one. I see a "T" so I'm pronouncing it.
If you say it "Off-en" THEN you sound like you are from Alabama.
"Hey ya'll, I offen go huntin with my ma and Pa"
 
2013-04-18 12:46:54 PM  
Subby, most of the incorrect pronunciations listed on that page would mark a significant improvement in pronunciation for Alabamans.
 
2013-04-18 12:46:54 PM  
I pronounce all of those as they say the "correct" way exkept for sherbert.
 
2013-04-18 12:47:01 PM  
11. Discrete (meaning, two of more individual things or events) vs. discreet (meaning let's not let our spouses find out about this...)
 
2013-04-18 12:47:04 PM  
Excape has always driven me crazy

/expecially when it's some TV news talking head doing it
 
2013-04-18 12:48:49 PM  
The article said "Idiot" not "Inbred hillbilly"
 
2013-04-18 12:50:14 PM  
Alabama has plenty of people intelligent enough to pronounce words correctly. They just don't get elected to public office.
 
2013-04-18 12:53:53 PM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Excape has always driven me crazy

/expecially when it's some TV news talking head doing it


Someone needs to ax them what their problem is.
 
2013-04-18 12:55:08 PM  
fascinating

fas-sun-ate-un
 
2013-04-18 12:55:14 PM  

FirstNationalBastard: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Excape has always driven me crazy

/expecially when it's some TV news talking head doing it

Someone needs to ax them what their problem is.


It's even worse when they're talking about an ask muderer
 
2013-04-18 12:56:29 PM  
Fixin', as in "I was fixin' to watch reruns of the 14 Tide football titles, but i had to make a beer run first."
 
2013-04-18 12:57:43 PM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: FirstNationalBastard: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Excape has always driven me crazy

/expecially when it's some TV news talking head doing it

Someone needs to ax them what their problem is.

It's even worse when they're talking about an ask muderer


What an Ask murderer may look like

newsimg.bbc.co.ukView Full Size
 
2013-04-18 12:58:45 PM  
Typical.

TFA conveniently skipped the possum or opossum conundrum.
 
2013-04-18 01:00:46 PM  
(Featured Partner)
 
2013-04-18 01:02:26 PM  
Sweet Home
 
2013-04-18 01:02:51 PM  
Aluminium
 
2013-04-18 01:03:31 PM  
Would you like some pie with cool hwip?
 
2013-04-18 01:04:29 PM  
Ex - presso

I've had people say this while serving me an espresso.
 
2013-04-18 01:04:39 PM  
NUCLEAR
Incorrect pronunciation: nuke - you - lerr

Correct pronunciation: new - clee - err

I'm going to try to get through this one without a President Bush joke. All right, so, despite the fact that it's 2008, this is a word with which we're somehow still struggling. Like most of the words on this list, "nuclear" is spelled EXACTLY AS IT IS SUPPOSED TO BE PRONOUNCED and yet, people continue to screw it up worse than the War in Iraq... oh, dammit.

^^^^  THIS
 
2013-04-18 01:04:51 PM  
The connection has timed out

Alabamians say the darndest things.
 
2013-04-18 01:04:54 PM  
Forgot a couple. "Exasperate" used in lieu of "Exacerbate", "The point is mute" instead of "The point is moot". "Hookers and blow" instead of "Ladies of ill repute and cocaine". The list goes on.
 
2013-04-18 01:05:23 PM  

JerkyMeat: Typical.

TFA conveniently skipped the possum or opossum conundrum.


Crayfish, crawfish, crawdads, craydads, craydiddies, little tiny fresh water lobsters...
 
2013-04-18 01:05:49 PM  
 "If you're using words like "snuck," "brang," or "irregardless," (no, none of those are real words)...  "

Wtf ?   That's unpossible.

H'aint ?
 
2013-04-18 01:05:58 PM  

Oldiron_79: Would you like some pie with cool hwip?


Only if it's served by Hwil Hweaton.
 
2013-04-18 01:06:14 PM  

SultanofSchwing: Aluminium


Yes, people do sound stupid adding an extra "I" into Aluminum.
 
2013-04-18 01:06:22 PM  
If you use "ignorant" as if it's a synonym for "rude", I'll think you're from western Pennsylvania, which is like Alabama with more snow.
 
2013-04-18 01:07:20 PM  
Common headlines that when you don't use correct punctuation or just throw a random that in there that make people think you were educated in America and furthermore
 
2013-04-18 01:08:23 PM  

you have pee hands: If you use "ignorant" as if it's a synonym for "rude", I'll think you're from western Pennsylvania, which is like Alabama with more snow.


I'll wait until I hear "yinz goin' dahntahn to da Jine Iggle?"
 
2013-04-18 01:08:24 PM  

Strik3r: NUCLEAR
Incorrect pronunciation: nuke - you - lerr

Correct pronunciation: new - clee - err

I'm going to try to get through this one without a President Bush joke. All right, so, despite the fact that it's 2008, this is a word with which we're somehow still struggling. Like most of the words on this list, "nuclear" is spelled EXACTLY AS IT IS SUPPOSED TO BE PRONOUNCED and yet, people continue to screw it up worse than the War in Iraq... oh, dammit.

^^^^  THIS


There's an obvious explanation for this.

"nuke" is shorthand for "cook in the microwave".  Everyone says "nuke" a dozen times a week.  Then they try to transition back to the root word, and can't shove the 'l' into that first syllable.

"nuke" - "ular"  is like jocular, ocular, popular, etc.
 
2013-04-18 01:09:18 PM  
Listen to a Kiwi say urine or methane. LULZ
 
2013-04-18 01:09:53 PM  
Comfortable

com-for-tah-bull

Library

lie-barry
 
2013-04-18 01:11:13 PM  
Someone fails at linguistic history. There's a reason why so many folks put an r at the end of sherbet. It's the same reason if you're out in the sticks you'll hear someone say "warsh." It's called an "intrusive r" and is common in most rhotic dialects of English. It's a peculiarity of r-pronunciation, and not unique to English, but all languages that feature an analog of the English R.

I'd also like to note that awry comes from "a wrien," comparable to "aglee" in Scottish brogue. I might mention that aglee is indeed pronounced the "wrong" way. It's called a vowel shift, something that some folks out there didn't really get to participate in. They're not so much "wrong" as somewhere they fell off the linguistic bus.

And, finally, fark you for being a prescriptivist. English changes faster than you can write down your silly rules. Write and speak to your audience, don't write and speak to a handful of mostly dead men's grammatical peeves. English is the most mutable language in recorded history, and some of us would like to keep it that way.
 
2013-04-18 01:11:41 PM  

dramatools: Alabama America has plenty of people intelligent enough to pronounce words correctly. They just don't get elected to public office.


I know you historians' lives revolve around trolling anyone from the south, but for the sake of accuracy this one can be expanded to encompass the entire spectrum.
 
2013-04-18 01:11:53 PM  

FirstNationalBastard: SultanofSchwing: Aluminium

Yes, people do sound stupid adding an extra "I" into Aluminum.


/shakes tiny fist
 
2013-04-18 01:12:13 PM  

netcentric: "If you're using words like "snuck," "brang," or "irregardless," (no, none of those are real words)...  "

Wtf ?   That's unpossible.

H'aint ?


Well, according to the Random House Dictionary, "First recorded in writing toward the end of the 19th century in the United States, snuck has become in recent decades a standard variant past tense and past participle of the verb sneak".
So if people have been using it that way for over a century, then yes, it's a real word.
 
2013-04-18 01:12:38 PM  
Fun Fact:  The first syllable of the name Xavier is "ig".

/couldn't open the site, so didn't RTFA
 
2013-04-18 01:13:14 PM  
My pet peave is when people pronounce tournament "Ternament"

and yet people around here look at me funny when i pronounce it with a TOUR...

/done ranting
 
2013-04-18 01:13:42 PM  
Lulz people from different places pronounce things differently and people judge people on how they talk. This is so interesting.
 
2013-04-18 01:14:24 PM  

puckrock2000: netcentric: "If you're using words like "snuck," "brang," or "irregardless," (no, none of those are real words)...  "

Wtf ?   That's unpossible.

H'aint ?

Well, according to the Random House Dictionary, "First recorded in writing toward the end of the 19th century in the United States, snuck has become in recent decades a standard variant past tense and past participle of the verb sneak".
So if people have been using it that way for over a century, then yes, it's a real word.


^This^

Snuck is so a real word!
 
2013-04-18 01:14:38 PM  

palladiate: Someone fails at linguistic history. There's a reason why so many folks put an r at the end of sherbet. It's the same reason if you're out in the sticks you'll hear someone say "warsh." It's called an "intrusive r" and is common in most rhotic dialects of English. It's a peculiarity of r-pronunciation, and not unique to English, but all languages that feature an analog of the English R.

I'd also like to note that awry comes from "a wrien," comparable to "aglee" in Scottish brogue. I might mention that aglee is indeed pronounced the "wrong" way. It's called a vowel shift, something that some folks out there didn't really get to participate in. They're not so much "wrong" as somewhere they fell off the linguistic bus.

And, finally, fark you for being a prescriptivist. English changes faster than you can write down your silly rules. Write and speak to your audience, don't write and speak to a handful of mostly dead men's grammatical peeves. English is the most mutable language in recorded history, and some of us would like to keep it that way.


Nerd...
 
2013-04-18 01:14:55 PM  

netcentric: "If you're using words like "snuck," "brang," or "irregardless," (no, none of those are real words)...  "

Wtf ?   That's unpossible.

H'aint ?


userserve-ak.last.fmView Full Size


"Huh.  News to me."
 
2013-04-18 01:15:30 PM  
Shoes? Mah bar feet can walk on broken glass. Take them "shews" back to the nort, thank you very much.
 
2013-04-18 01:16:25 PM  
Do whut?
 
2013-04-18 01:16:48 PM  
media.tumblr.comView Full Size


Approves.
 
2013-04-18 01:17:44 PM  

SovietCanuckistan: Listen to a Kiwi say urine or methane. LULZ


aluminum... somehow becomes Al- u-min-i-um
 
2013-04-18 01:19:09 PM  
Site is farked for me, but did they get "li-berry?"  As a librarian that one always pisses me off, especially when said by other "li-berrians."

And do we have official word on the pronunciation of "important?"  When I was living in Alabama, it was often pronounced "im-POR-tin," without the final "t".  I, on the other hand, pronounce it "im-POR-nt," pronouncing the final "t" but with a glottal stop in place of the first "t".
 
2013-04-18 01:19:40 PM  

HortusMatris: puckrock2000: netcentric: "If you're using words like "snuck," "brang," or "irregardless," (no, none of those are real words)...  "

Wtf ?   That's unpossible.

H'aint ?

Well, according to the Random House Dictionary, "First recorded in writing toward the end of the 19th century in the United States, snuck has become in recent decades a standard variant past tense and past participle of the verb sneak".
So if people have been using it that way for over a century, then yes, it's a real word.

^This^

Snuck is so a real word!


I'll give you snuck, but goddammitsomuch I will never surrender to "irregardless!"
 
2013-04-18 01:20:43 PM  
Common words that when you say them make people know you're not from Alabama: African, American.
 
2013-04-18 01:21:03 PM  

dramatools: Alabama has plenty of people intelligent enough to pronounce words correctly. They just don't get elected to public office.


No matter where you're from, you speak like those around you. Intelligence, or lack thereof, has nothing to do with it.
 
2013-04-18 01:21:54 PM  

FirstNationalBastard: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Excape has always driven me crazy

/expecially when it's some TV news talking head doing it

Someone needs to ax them what their problem is.


you know what's funny about ask? in middle english it was aks.  thus, the historically accurate pronunciation is aks.  you just have some group of people who decided to bastardize the language because they wanted it to sound less germanic.
 
2013-04-18 01:22:06 PM  
the thing that toasts my giblets is the past tense of 'to see'...

I don't know how or why but the word 'seen' gets used a lot in my part of the country and it's like nails on a chalkboard to me..  ex:  I seen where Joe went an got him a new truck.  Hey, I seen your sister down at the girlie club last weekend...
 
2013-04-18 01:23:39 PM  
aluminum... somehow becomes Al- u-min-i-um

The -ium is how us Brits say it.  I think Bill Bryson researched it and said the original element was named as -"aluminum: and that's how the US says it and spells it.  For some reason the brits decided that it sounded better if you add the -ium and made it aluminium.    I guess they look at other "um" elements such as "calcium" and decided to keep to that format.  potato - potato, tomato - tomato.
 
2013-04-18 01:24:02 PM  

vsavatar: (Featured Partner)


/Not subby
 
2013-04-18 01:24:04 PM  
I want to pronounce forte (strong point) properly ("fort"), but then people don't know what the hell I'm saying so I end up just pronouncing it incorrectly (like the musical term - "fort-ay").
 
2013-04-18 01:27:18 PM  
"Sheriff" instead of "shire reeve."
"Only" instead of "onely."
"Diverse" instead of "divers."
 
2013-04-18 01:27:40 PM  

limeyferg: aluminum... somehow becomes Al- u-min-i-um

The -ium is how us Brits say it.  I think Bill Bryson researched it and said the original element was named as -"aluminum: and that's how the US says it and spells it.  For some reason the brits decided that it sounded better if you add the -ium and made it aluminium.    I guess they look at other "um" elements such as "calcium" and decided to keep to that format.  potato - potato, tomato - tomato.


Sir Humphry named it Aluminium after it's discovery in 1812.  Wasn't until later when American publications dropped the "ium" in favor of "um."
 
2013-04-18 01:27:55 PM  
OK OK OK
PRIMER Magazine.

Is it pronounced
PRIM-MER
or
PRIME-ER?
 
2013-04-18 01:28:02 PM  
"My property taxes is too danged high! And all they're doing is takin' 'em and givin' 'em to the gun-grabbers!"

(The tragic joke is that Alabama has the lowest property taxes in the nation.)
 
2013-04-18 01:28:29 PM  

SultanofSchwing: limeyferg: aluminum... somehow becomes Al- u-min-i-um

The -ium is how us Brits say it.  I think Bill Bryson researched it and said the original element was named as -"aluminum: and that's how the US says it and spells it.  For some reason the brits decided that it sounded better if you add the -ium and made it aluminium.    I guess they look at other "um" elements such as "calcium" and decided to keep to that format.  potato - potato, tomato - tomato.

Sir Humphry named it Aluminium after it's its discovery in 1812.  Wasn't until later when American publications dropped the "ium" in favor of "um."


ftfm...farking up it's and its in a spelling thread...fark me
 
2013-04-18 01:29:27 PM  
Couldn't read TFA.

VEE-Hick-ul. That'd be a car.
 
2013-04-18 01:30:04 PM  
I live in St. Clair County AL about 35 min. drive from Talladega ('Dega).  The drawl & language on the factory floor at my last job would probably make most of ya'll internet folks' ears fall off.   "I gotta git down to tha doller stoar 'fore Misty gits off her shift at tha cracker Barrel. We gon git some coors lite & go to tha races"  Also, Row Tide ya'll.
 
2013-04-18 01:30:11 PM  

puckrock2000: netcentric: "If you're using words like "snuck," "brang," or "irregardless," (no, none of those are real words)...  "

Wtf ?   That's unpossible.

H'aint ?

Well, according to the Random House Dictionary, "First recorded in writing toward the end of the 19th century in the United States, snuck has become in recent decades a standard variant past tense and past participle of the verb sneak".
So if people have been using it that way for over a century, then yes, it's a real word.


If it doesn't work to point out literally was used to mean figuratively from the get go, good luck with snuck.
 
2013-04-18 01:31:59 PM  
i171.photobucket.comView Full Size


I do love me some carmel apples.
 
2013-04-18 01:32:11 PM  

pute kisses like a man: FirstNationalBastard: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Excape has always driven me crazy

/expecially when it's some TV news talking head doing it

Someone needs to ax them what their problem is.

you know what's funny about ask? in middle english it was aks.  thus, the historically accurate pronunciation is aks.  you just have some group of people who decided to bastardize the language because they wanted it to sound less germanic.


Thank you.  Was about to look it up to post, but now I can just be lazy.
 
2013-04-18 01:32:28 PM  
Even here in Ohio, seemingly no TV reporter can pronounce 'February'. Listen to the 1st minute of Don McLean's "American Pie" where he nails it correctly. (Hint: two Rs).
/yeah, I'm a Pisces
 
2013-04-18 01:33:32 PM  
"Pisture" instead of picture.
My year there was one of the most frustrating of my life.
Oh, and "flusterated."
 
2013-04-18 01:34:50 PM  

FrancoFile: Strik3r: NUCLEAR
Incorrect pronunciation: nuke - you - lerr

Correct pronunciation: new - clee - err

I'm going to try to get through this one without a President Bush joke. All right, so, despite the fact that it's 2008, this is a word with which we're somehow still struggling. Like most of the words on this list, "nuclear" is spelled EXACTLY AS IT IS SUPPOSED TO BE PRONOUNCED and yet, people continue to screw it up worse than the War in Iraq... oh, dammit.

^^^^  THIS

There's an obvious explanation for this.

"nuke" is shorthand for "cook in the microwave".  Everyone says "nuke" a dozen times a week.  Then they try to transition back to the root word, and can't shove the 'l' into that first syllable.

"nuke" - "ular"  is like jocular, ocular, popular, etc.


.....  so, in other words, they are lazy, ignorant and illiterate......
 
2013-04-18 01:35:25 PM  
"Skrimps" instead of "Shrimps"
 
2013-04-18 01:36:14 PM  
Antidisestablishmentarianism
 
2013-04-18 01:36:25 PM  

Sofa King Smart: the thing that toasts my giblets is the past tense of 'to see'...

I don't know how or why but the word 'seen' gets used a lot in my part of the country and it's like nails on a chalkboard to me..  ex:  I seen where Joe went an got him a new truck.  Hey, I seen your sister down at the girlie club last weekend...


Before I even checked your profile, I knew you lived in or near Kentucky.

As annoying regional word usage goes, I couldn't agree with you more. I have an incredible aversion to the word "seen". It's the instant mark of a moron, and I grew up around way too many of those people.
 
2013-04-18 01:36:31 PM  
Bless your hearts.
 
2013-04-18 01:37:12 PM  

Walker: OFTEN
Incorrect pronunciation: off - ten
Correct pronunciation: off - en

 Oh, I'm not going along with this one. I see a "T" so I'm pronouncing it.
If you say it "Off-en" THEN you sound like you are from Alabama.
"Hey ya'll, I offen go huntin with my ma and Pa"



Ahem.  The contracted form of  you all is spelt y'all.  It would not surprise me to find that most Alabamans know how to spell that.
 
2013-04-18 01:37:19 PM  

DaddyRat: Bless your hearts.


*gasp* YOU TAKE THAT BACK!
 
2013-04-18 01:37:57 PM  

Rapmaster2000: The connection has timed out

Alabamians say the darndest things.


The server at www.primermagazine.com is taking too long to respond.
 
2013-04-18 01:37:59 PM  
I use the word terlet instead of toilet, not because i'm anywhere near the south, but simply because it amuses me.

One thing i've never seen anyone mention, but seems to be fairly common, is Americans pronouncing measure as maesure.
 
2013-04-18 01:39:44 PM  

Rapmaster2000: I'll wait until I hear "yinz goin' dahntahn to da Jine Iggle?"


Dere ain' eny Jine Iggle dahntahn. Ahm goin' dahntahn for some Ahrn Ciddy n'ta see dem Stillers, n'at.
 
2013-04-18 01:39:55 PM  

GanjSmokr: I want to pronounce forte (strong point) properly ("fort"), but then people don't know what the hell I'm saying so I end up just pronouncing it incorrectly (like the musical term - "fort-ay").


Eh, both the French fort and Italian forte mean the same thing, "strong."  It's just the femininization of a French word, which is pretty common.  I wouldn't worry about it unless you also pronounce locale as "LOC-al" and morale as "MOR-al."
 
2013-04-18 01:41:20 PM  

Sofa King Smart: the thing that toasts my giblets is the past tense of 'to see'...

I don't know how or why but the word 'seen' gets used a lot in my part of the country and it's like nails on a chalkboard to me..  ex:  I seen where Joe went an got him a new truck.  Hey, I seen your sister down at the girlie club last weekend...


That almost drives me to violence.
 
2013-04-18 01:41:23 PM  
Urine idiot!
 
2013-04-18 01:41:30 PM  
Yes, Alabamans mangle the language. Idiot flyover country people.

I wonder what a similar analysis of Boston linguistics would look like...
 
2013-04-18 01:42:44 PM  

Incredulous: Ahem. The contracted form of you all is spelt y'all. It would not surprise me to find that most Alabamians know how to spell that.


FTFY

And yes, they would, as do Alabamian immigrants.
 
2013-04-18 01:42:46 PM  
Any word that ends with an "-oh" sound turns into ending with an "-er" sound: window, fellow, tomato, pillow, hollow.
 
2013-04-18 01:43:33 PM  
Go to Appalachian Kentucky and Tennessee for some interesting pronunciations. But don't ask about West Virginia. I have no farking idea what those folks are speaking.

"Thawt ah seed a haint ina trees. Were jes a painter, thaw."
 
2013-04-18 01:44:33 PM  

DrPainMD: dramatools: Alabama has plenty of people intelligent enough to pronounce words correctly. They just don't get elected to public office.

No matter where you're from, you speak like those around you. Intelligence, or lack thereof, has nothing to do with it.


That's only partially true. I grew up in Central Kentucky. I do not have a pronounced accent*, because I had access to television in my youth, and thus was exposed to more voices than those in my immediate surroundings. Even from a young age, I knew I didn't want to sound like the locals.

However, there is a difference between accent and pronunciation. While I may have almost no accent, there are clues to my region of upbringing in my speech. For example, when I say something is "ours", it is not a homophone of "hours". Instead, it sounds as though I am speaking of multiples of the letter R. Rs.

*Unless I get a little whiskey in me. Then, a twang is known to appear.
 
2013-04-18 01:44:52 PM  

crawdadhead: Urine idiot eejit!


FTFY
 
2013-04-18 01:45:05 PM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Excape has always driven me crazy

/expecially when it's some TV news talking head doing it


I have a very intelligent friend who says "excape" and "expecially". But he substitutes "x" for "s" in all "esp..." words he says, except if the word is a Spanish word.
 
2013-04-18 01:45:23 PM  
My old linguistics professor, Jay Hoar, had a lecture, "Ain't is a Beautiful Word" and it was one of those classes that folks who had taken classes with him, would come by and hear over and over again. He was a fierce proponent of colloquial and regional dialects, enriching the tongue, and connecting us to our history. In this case, as far back as the 1600s.

Regional dialects are indicative of play with the language, strengthening ties amongst a regional population, and identification with time and place. The scrubbed down versions of broadcast English, both here and across the ocean, are attempts to codify the language away from those tendencies. Even while writing slowed linguistic drift, we now have television and movies to take snapshots of the language, with audio as well as visual cues to emulate social class and standing. English is enormously elastic in its ability to morph and change, with speakers often switching between dialects to fit their social circles.

To be able to switch those dialects, isn't a sign of smartness nor idiocy, but in the ability to suit language and speaking styles to the audience. Colloquialisms aren't formal, but they have their place, and in many cases are exactly the tone that one needs. There are folks who don't switch their speaking styles to suit their audiences, and then there are those who lean upon it heavily to give the impression of being more "folksy" and in the end, one has to realize the content of the speech, as opposed to method of its delivery is more important.

The one thing that regional dialects tend to do, is preserve language. Each is a sort of mixing pot, and often they wind up being natural reserves for forms that have faded from the "formal" dialect, which is itself merely a dialect that has popularity, and is often associated with a particular class or area that power is projected from. Early grammars in the US made ruthless use of this, to demonize many regional dialects, while promoting the rules of their own. This is no less the case in England, and even Malayasia has switched its teaching programs to favor American Standard English, to phase out British Standard English to teach their youth. Language is linked to class, and it is linked to popularity of forms, and the one hard and rigid rule within the language is mutual intelligibility. Dialects can shift and morph to the point where that mutual intelligibility can be blurred, and even lost with some accents and dialects moving away from one another, often because of relative isolation. Even in England, small towns that insular, develop and keep their own dialects strong, to reinforce their own heritage and identity, while giving some measure of deference to the "official" dialect.

There is no "proper" English. Only mutually intelligible English, and given that more folks speak English in Asia right now, than in the US or England combined, it is going to be very interesting century to see how the language shifts and morphs with that impact, especially given the number of non-native speakers, and folks who are coming into second and even third generation speakers, who have never been to a nation where English is the official language. "Proper" English is about politics and projection of power, to regulate societies to conforming to a particular cultural model. We pick up cues from folks' accent and dialect, and we're good at placing that which is different than our own, and ordering it within a framework of social and cultural hierarchy. Which, in fairness, is what humans do within ANY language framework--even sign language.
 
2013-04-18 01:45:24 PM  

rugman11: Site is farked for me, but did they get "li-berry?"  As a librarian that one always pisses me off, especially when said by other "li-berrians."

And do we have official word on the pronunciation of "important?"  When I was living in Alabama, it was often pronounced "im-POR-tin," without the final "t".  I, on the other hand, pronounce it "im-POR-nt," pronouncing the final "t" but with a glottal stop in place of the first "t".


Ditto "ingn'int" and "sar'nt". Those grind my gears.

// CSB: at my brother's graduation from Ft Knox, I referred to his DI as "Staff-Sarn't XXXXXXXXX"
// mostly because he was a vet of Afghanistan (too some shrapnel there, according to the former PFC), and I didn't want to get thrown through a wall
 
2013-04-18 01:48:31 PM  

namegoeshere: Crayfish, crawfish, crawdads, craydads, craydiddies, little tiny fresh water lobsters...


Mud bugs.
 
2013-04-18 01:49:04 PM  

vudukungfu: OK OK OK
PRIMER Magazine.

Is it pronounced
PRIM-MER
or
PRIME-ER?



vowel-consonant-vowel = first vowel is long (typically).

To pronounce it "primmer" you would have to have -- you guessed it -- two letter Ms in there (or bad teeth).
 
2013-04-18 01:49:28 PM  

I want your skull: namegoeshere: Crayfish, crawfish, crawdads, craydads, craydiddies, little tiny fresh water lobsters...

Mud bugs.


Tasty, delicious mud bugs.
 
2013-04-18 01:49:41 PM  
OK, it's another "pick on Southerners" thread.

How about some of you upper Ohio Valley peeps educate me on exactly what the fark kind of accent they have in SE Ohio?  I lived in New Lexington, OH for two years, and about 1/3 of the people I met had this nasally, pinched way of delivering vowels: "home" = "haame", "I'm" = "Oim", etc.

I agree many Southerners don't do much to help the perception that we're all uneducated, but these people sounded like they were from another planet!

Thanks in advance, y'all!
 
2013-04-18 01:50:13 PM  

rugman11: Incredulous: Ahem. The contracted form of you all is spelt y'all. It would not surprise me to find that most Alabamians know how to spell that.

FTFY

And yes, they would, as do Alabamian immigrants.


What an Alabamian might look like:
images.wikia.comView Full Size
 
2013-04-18 01:50:42 PM  

fruitloop: Any word that ends with an "-oh" sound turns into ending with an "-er" sound: window, fellow, tomato, pillow, hollow.


Sandra Er agrees.

images.zap2it.comView Full Size
 
ows
2013-04-18 01:50:54 PM  
I met the ugliest woman I ever did SAW.........
 
2013-04-18 01:51:17 PM  

pute kisses like a man: in middle english it was aks.  thus, the historically accurate pronunciation is aks.


Well, not really. Up until 1600 "ax" was considered an acceptable word for "ask", and it derives from "acsian" in Old English. But also dating back to Old English is "ascian", which is the root of the modern "ask".

Arguably, "ask" is more historically "accurate" because it's closer to the roots across many closely related languages: Proto-Germanic's "aiskojan", Saxon's "escon", Old High German's "eiscon",. The "ais-" prefix itself ties back to Sanskrit and Armenian.

All that is to say, "aks" was an acceptable historical anomaly, but was never "the" accurate pronunciation of "ask".
 
2013-04-18 01:51:50 PM  
Chocolate gravy.
 
2013-04-18 01:51:53 PM  

puckrock2000: netcentric: "If you're using words like "snuck," "brang," or "irregardless," (no, none of those are real words)...  "

Wtf ?   That's unpossible.

H'aint ?

Well, according to the Random House Dictionary, "First recorded in writing toward the end of the 19th century in the United States, snuck has become in recent decades a standard variant past tense and past participle of the verb sneak".
So if people have been using it that way for over a century, then yes, it's a real word.


Until a year ago I had never even heard the word "sneaked". It's been "snuck" my entire life. "Sneaked" sounds wrong, like "finded".

We need more irregular verbs.
 
2013-04-18 01:52:34 PM  
ashfalt
 
2013-04-18 01:53:05 PM  
Oh, and I still don't see how the Brits get "leftenant" out of "lieutenant".
 
2013-04-18 01:54:04 PM  
My philosophy on English is that it is a living language, so feel free to come up with new words as needed or desired.  Verbify nouns, make composite words, come up with new onomonopias, etc. I have no qualms with any of this.  But, once we have come up with a word I think we should all agree on one spelling for it. Misspellings just cause confusion, and they cannot be excused as "living language".

To an extent grammar fall into this need for agreement as well.  While grammatical structures may change over time, and we do need to adapt to that, we still need consistency for how we put the current grammar in writing.  Having grammar all over the place causes confusion, so we really should strive to use the presently accepted grammar.


/I am sure there is a misspelling and several grammatical errors in this post
 
2013-04-18 01:56:35 PM  

fruitloop: [i171.photobucket.com image 185x272]

I do love me some carmel

carnal apples.

/Pet peeve
 
2013-04-18 01:57:16 PM  
Roll Tide
 
2013-04-18 01:57:39 PM  

t3knomanser: pute kisses like a man: in middle english it was aks.  thus, the historically accurate pronunciation is aks.

Well, not really. Up until 1600 "ax" was considered an acceptable word for "ask", and it derives from "acsian" in Old English. But also dating back to Old English is "ascian", which is the root of the modern "ask".

Arguably, "ask" is more historically "accurate" because it's closer to the roots across many closely related languages: Proto-Germanic's "aiskojan", Saxon's "escon", Old High German's "eiscon",. The "ais-" prefix itself ties back to Sanskrit and Armenian.

All that is to say, "aks" was an acceptable historical anomaly, but was never "the" accurate pronunciation of "ask".


What a lot of dialects do is preserve older forms. And it boils down to mutual intelligibility.

English is a riotous profusion of forms, with formal and informal often blurring over the years. Long years at that, as a trade tongue, it borrowed heavily from Latinate forms, as well as the Germanic forebears, and the odd bits of Gaelic and other languages it butts up against. It is a sponge for new words, from languages that are no where near those roots.

"Proper" English is no more than the dialect that is used by those in current power, and taught as being the "correct" version, as a method of cultural control. It is a device of politics, not linguistics. Populations that are isolated by region spin dialects out of use. "Proper" English is only "proper" because folks in power would like their version be the formal one, and it is reinforced again and again, to keep those populations slightly isolated, by marginalizing the usage from their region. It's not about proper, it's merely a tool of politics.
 
2013-04-18 01:59:20 PM  

fruitloop: Any word that ends with an "-oh" sound turns into ending with an "-er" sound: window, fellow, tomato, pillow, hollow.


my mom, born & raised in Queens, NY, pronounced my name peetah, and my sisters name donner ..

//also bottel ..
 
2013-04-18 01:59:31 PM  
hay, wach yall talkin about
 
2013-04-18 02:00:14 PM  

vudukungfu: OK OK OK
PRIMER Magazine.

Is it pronounced
PRIM-MER
or
PRIME-ER?


Good call.
To me it is the latter.  To old librarians it is the former.
 
2013-04-18 02:01:23 PM  

DrPainMD: dramatools: Alabama has plenty of people intelligent enough to pronounce words correctly. They just don't get elected to public office.

No matter where you're from, you speak like those around you. Intelligence, or lack thereof, has nothing to do with it.


This is true. However, speech in Alabama isn't as uniform as you might think. College educated people with ties to out of state develop their own social networks, which preserves pockets of better speech. Additionally, Alabamians spend their evenings watching the same shows and hearing the same Midwestern American Standard pronunciation as the rest of us do.

I always thought the exaggerated southern speech that Alabamian politicians use was an affectation. Maybe that isn't the right word. It was genuine, but they deliberately preserve speaking with as thick an accent as possible. It not only conveys that they're good ole boys, but it shows they're outsiders fighting the evil beltway insiders.

Howell Heflin was the classic example.
 
2013-04-18 02:02:24 PM  

FirstNationalBastard: Oh, and I still don't see how the Brits get "leftenant" out of "lieutenant".


Comes from the old french spelling of "leuf" as opposed to the more modern "lieu."  That's according to my Lord Strathcona's tank buddy.
 
2013-04-18 02:02:34 PM  
Bless his heart.

I'd like to date someone outside of the family.

I'm going out to the hollyhocks; anyone seen the White Pages?
 
2013-04-18 02:03:14 PM  

Xenomech: vudukungfu: OK OK OK
PRIMER Magazine.

Is it pronounced
PRIM-MER
or
PRIME-ER?


vowel-consonant-vowel = first vowel is long (typically).

To pronounce it "primmer" you would have to have -- you guessed it -- two letter Ms in there (or bad teeth).


Wrong.

/PRIM-er is a lesson or a guide; PRIME-er is the first coat of paint.
//since the magazine bills itself as containing "Self-development, how-to guides, career advice, and reclaiming manliness", it should use the first pronunciation
///but you'd probably have to axe the managing editor, and he'll splain it to you
 
2013-04-18 02:04:08 PM  
This one I've noticed in the northeast. It's subtle, but "dr" at the beginning of words turns into "jr". Drop becomes jrop.
 
2013-04-18 02:04:56 PM  
IGNUNT
 
2013-04-18 02:05:21 PM  

maxx2112: Roll Tide


And we are done here.
 
2013-04-18 02:05:26 PM  
I hate when people use the phrase " my work". As in:

I need to drive to my work today to pick up some documents. JOB. In that sentence, the correct word to use would be job. Or, leave off the "my". Please. For me.
 
2013-04-18 02:05:32 PM  

hubiestubert: English is a riotous profusion of forms


I think that's part of what has given English its viral power. Oh, sure, much of the modern world speaks English because of three centuries of Anglophile colonialism, but there seems to be something attractive about the way English is very forgiving of neologisms and neogrammatisms. We tend to feel that parts of speech are more of a suggestion, which means verbing nouns or nouning verbs is perfectly acceptable. New words tend to pop up and quickly become common. I don't know how many other languages would have easily facilitated LOLCATS. Anything with a phonetic spelling is automatically eliminated. Languages that elide vowels too.

hubiestubert: "Proper" English is only "proper" because folks in power would like their version be the formal one


As it goes, the closest modern dialect to Elizabethan English would be what they speak in Kentucky. Keep that in mind when you watch Shakespearian plays.
 
2013-04-18 02:05:47 PM  

Sofa King Smart: the thing that toasts my giblets is the past tense of 'to see'...

I don't know how or why but the word 'seen' gets used a lot in my part of the country and it's like nails on a chalkboard to me..  ex:  I seen where Joe went an got him a new truck.  Hey, I seen your sister down at the girlie club last weekend...


On this very night, ten years ago, along this very stretch of road in a dense fog just like this. I saw the worst accident I ever seen. There was this sound, like a garbage truck dropped off the Empire State Building... And when they pulled the driver's body from the twisted, burning wreck. It looked like this...
i10.photobucket.comView Full Size
 
2013-04-18 02:06:46 PM  

fruitloop: Any word that ends with an "-oh" sound turns into ending with an "-er" sound: window, fellow, tomato, pillow, hollow.


You do realize that this is actually a British thing as well?

Anyone recall Peter Davison's run as the Doctor?  And how he constantly referred to Nyssa as Nyss-er?  But the best was the villain Omega....PD called him Omig-er throughout the episode.  Very funny.
 
2013-04-18 02:07:01 PM  

FirstNationalBastard: Oh, and I still don't see how the Brits get "leftenant" out of "lieutenant".


I always thought it was weird that English drops the middle letters in the pronunciation of "colonel". Then I learned military ranks in Hebrew - it's pronounced "co-low-NELL" (the first 2 syllables rhyme), which makes far more sense. Based on the fact that Hebrew borrows a whole fark of a lot from British English, I wonder if they do this in The Queen's as well.
 
2013-04-18 02:09:19 PM  
You people are becoming just as bad as the French.
 
2013-04-18 02:09:54 PM  

ristst: fruitloop: Any word that ends with an "-oh" sound turns into ending with an "-er" sound: window, fellow, tomato, pillow, hollow.

You do realize that this is actually a British thing as well?

Anyone recall Peter Davison's run as the Doctor?  And how he constantly referred to Nyssa as Nyss-er?  But the best was the villain Omega....PD called him Omig-er throughout the episode.  Very funny.


This tread is getting very My Fair Lady.

In Hartford, Hereford, and Hampshire, Hurricanes Hardly ever Happen. HHHHHHHHHHHHHHH.....HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH...HHHHHHHHHHHH
 
2013-04-18 02:10:58 PM  

hubiestubert: t3knomanser: pute kisses like a man: in middle english it was aks.  thus, the historically accurate pronunciation is aks.

Well, not really. Up until 1600 "ax" was considered an acceptable word for "ask", and it derives from "acsian" in Old English. But also dating back to Old English is "ascian", which is the root of the modern "ask".

Arguably, "ask" is more historically "accurate" because it's closer to the roots across many closely related languages: Proto-Germanic's "aiskojan", Saxon's "escon", Old High German's "eiscon",. The "ais-" prefix itself ties back to Sanskrit and Armenian.

All that is to say, "aks" was an acceptable historical anomaly, but was never "the" accurate pronunciation of "ask".

What a lot of dialects do is preserve older forms. And it boils down to mutual intelligibility.

English is a riotous profusion of forms, with formal and informal often blurring over the years. Long years at that, as a trade tongue, it borrowed heavily from Latinate forms, as well as the Germanic forebears, and the odd bits of Gaelic and other languages it butts up against. It is a sponge for new words, from languages that are no where near those roots.

"Proper" English is no more than the dialect that is used by those in current power, and taught as being the "correct" version, as a method of cultural control. It is a device of politics, not linguistics. Populations that are isolated by region spin dialects out of use. "Proper" English is only "proper" because folks in power would like their version be the formal one, and it is reinforced again and again, to keep those populations slightly isolated, by marginalizing the usage from their region. It's not about proper, it's merely a tool of politics.


i3.ytimg.comView Full Size


"Yes, well that's not exactly what I've got written on the card,
but I knew your father, so Footlights lead by 25 points."



 
2013-04-18 02:11:11 PM  

Dr Dreidel: FirstNationalBastard: Oh, and I still don't see how the Brits get "leftenant" out of "lieutenant".

I always thought it was weird that English drops the middle letters in the pronunciation of "colonel". Then I learned military ranks in Hebrew - it's pronounced "co-low-NELL" (the first 2 syllables rhyme), which makes far more sense. Based on the fact that Hebrew borrows a whole fark of a lot from British English, I wonder if they do this in The Queen's as well.


They got the pronunciation from Italian but the spelling from French.
 
2013-04-18 02:11:14 PM  

namegoeshere: This tread is getting very My Fair Lady.


Tread, of course, being a perfectly cromulent dialectical variation of thread.
 
2013-04-18 02:11:44 PM  

YouPeopleAreCrazy: Yes, Alabamans mangle the language. Idiot flyover country people.

I wonder what a similar analysis of Boston linguistics would look like...


The way they and Long Islanders speak have to be the ugliest pronunciations of English anywhere.  Just awful.

And this speaks more to cultural bias than anything else, but I don't think anyone sounds dumber than a person from da Bronx.
 
2013-04-18 02:12:57 PM  

YouPeopleAreCrazy: Yes, Alabamans mangle the language. Idiot flyover country people.

I wonder what a similar analysis of Boston linguistics would look like...


Dude, too soon!

Also, when I lived in Philly and asked a friend if she wanted something to drink, I'd wonder how one could drink wood and what her other option was.
Water != Wooder.
 
2013-04-18 02:14:16 PM  

t3knomanser: hubiestubert: English is a riotous profusion of forms

I think that's part of what has given English its viral power. Oh, sure, much of the modern world speaks English because of three centuries of Anglophile colonialism, but there seems to be something attractive about the way English is very forgiving of neologisms and neogrammatisms. We tend to feel that parts of speech are more of a suggestion, which means verbing nouns or nouning verbs is perfectly acceptable. New words tend to pop up and quickly become common. I don't know how many other languages would have easily facilitated LOLCATS. Anything with a phonetic spelling is automatically eliminated. Languages that elide vowels too.

hubiestubert: "Proper" English is only "proper" because folks in power would like their version be the formal one

As it goes, the closest modern dialect to Elizabethan English would be what they speak in Kentucky. Keep that in mind when you watch Shakespearian plays.


Je peu avoir Royale avec fromage?
 
2013-04-18 02:16:31 PM  
If you say "under wire" you sound like a busty southern woman talkIng about her skivvies rather than her bra.

If you say "my cocaine" you sound like Michael Kane saying his name.

/that's alls I got
 
2013-04-18 02:18:30 PM  
Then there is ah-ite meaning alright.
 
2013-04-18 02:18:39 PM  

ristst: fruitloop: Any word that ends with an "-oh" sound turns into ending with an "-er" sound: window, fellow, tomato, pillow, hollow.

You do realize that this is actually a British thing as well?

Anyone recall Peter Davison's run as the Doctor?  And how he constantly referred to Nyssa as Nyss-er?  But the best was the villain Omega....PD called him Omig-er throughout the episode.  Very funny.


I think that mostly happens when the ending 'r' sound immediately precedes a vowel.
 
2013-04-18 02:19:47 PM  

YouPeopleAreCrazy: Yes, Alabamans mangle the language. Idiot flyover country people.

I wonder what a similar analysis of Boston linguistics would look like...


I refuse to recognize chowdahese as part of the Queen's English.
 
2013-04-18 02:20:29 PM  

Strik3r: NUCLEAR
Incorrect pronunciation: nuke - you - lerr

Correct pronunciation: new - clee - err

I'm going to try to get through this one without a President Bush joke. All right, so, despite the fact that it's 2008, this is a word with which we're somehow still struggling. Like most of the words on this list, "nuclear" is spelled EXACTLY AS IT IS SUPPOSED TO BE PRONOUNCED and yet, people continue to screw it up worse than the War in Iraq... oh, dammit.

^^^^  THIS


Same is true for Israel, too, yet so many pronounce it "is ree ahl" instead of "is rah el".
 
2013-04-18 02:21:16 PM  

Pants full of macaroni!!: ristst: fruitloop: Any word that ends with an "-oh" sound turns into ending with an "-er" sound: window, fellow, tomato, pillow, hollow.

You do realize that this is actually a British thing as well?

Anyone recall Peter Davison's run as the Doctor?  And how he constantly referred to Nyssa as Nyss-er?  But the best was the villain Omega....PD called him Omig-er throughout the episode.  Very funny.

I think that mostly happens when the ending 'r' sound immediately precedes a vowel.


Darn, lemme try that again.  When there's a word ending with a schwa vowel immediately preceding another vowel, an 'r' sound gets inserted.
 
2013-04-18 02:21:22 PM  
Michael Caine, rather
 
2013-04-18 02:23:27 PM  

Pocket Ninja: Subby, most of the incorrect pronunciations listed on that page would mark a significant improvement in pronunciation for Alabam

ians.


Where's the "i" at?
 
2013-04-18 02:23:55 PM  
These silly people from Osaka with their funny Kansai dialect... Osaka mamas.
 
2013-04-18 02:24:01 PM  

solitary: IGNUNT


Negatory, it's ig'nit.

You're something or other for not knowing that. What's the word... Damn, it's right on the tip of my thumb...
 
2013-04-18 02:24:56 PM  
 I don't think Hank done it this way
 
2013-04-18 02:26:31 PM  

Dr Dreidel: FirstNationalBastard: Oh, and I still don't see how the Brits get "leftenant" out of "lieutenant".

I always thought it was weird that English drops the middle letters in the pronunciation of "colonel". Then I learned military ranks in Hebrew - it's pronounced "co-low-NELL" (the first 2 syllables rhyme), which makes far more sense. Based on the fact that Hebrew borrows a whole fark of a lot from British English, I wonder if they do this in The Queen's as well.


LaBeau always called Col. Hogan "colo-NELL".

/my day will be complete if I can just reference Gen. Burkhalter
//Maj. Hochstetter was originally from Nashville, TN
 
2013-04-18 02:26:32 PM  
"hubiestubert: English is a riotous profusion of forms "

Mrs. Klisher ?
 
2013-04-18 02:26:40 PM  

mysticcat: Fixin', as in "I was fixin' to watch reruns of the 1415 Tide football titles, but i had to make a beer run first."


/FTFM
//RTR
 
2013-04-18 02:27:46 PM  

namegoeshere: JerkyMeat: Typical.

TFA conveniently skipped the possum or opossum conundrum.

Crayfish, crawfish, crawdads, craydads, craydiddies, little tiny fresh water lobsters...


Crawlfish, a New Orleans favorite of mine.
 
2013-04-18 02:28:09 PM  

StickyKleenexWad: I live in St. Clair County AL about 35 min. drive from Talladega ('Dega).  The drawl & language on the factory floor at my last job would probably make most of ya'll internet folks' ears fall off.   "I gotta git down to tha doller stoar 'fore Misty gits off her shift at tha cracker Barrel. We gon git some coors lite & go to tha races"  Also, Row Tide ya'll.


Oh your god do I remember listening to that shat.I had to really work on my diction in order to make sure i was taken seriously in broadcasting I lived 20 min from the Dega in Ohatchee AL. You might remember this small town from 2 a days on MTV when the head coach from Hoover high went home to mamas for Thanksgiving
 
2013-04-18 02:28:48 PM  

Xenomech: To pronounce it "primmer" you would have to have -- you guessed it -- two letter Ms in there (or bad teeth).


THEN TELL FARKING NPR TO STOP PRNOUNCING IT PRIMMER FOR GOD'S SAKES
THEY ARE ALL FARKING ENGRISH MAJORS, TOO.
It's bad enough all they hire are people with speech impediments.
 
2013-04-18 02:28:57 PM  
Dont forget people that pronounce Missouri Missourah.
 
2013-04-18 02:29:42 PM  

J. Frank Parnell: I use the word terlet instead of toilet, not because i'm anywhere near the south, but simply because it amuses me.

One thing i've never seen anyone mention, but seems to be fairly common, is Americans pronouncing measure as maesure.


There was an anchorman on CNN who used to do that. He had the normal "neutral" accent for most words, but when he said measure he sounded like Gomer f*ckin' Pyle. "Go-lleee! Sarge is makin' me may-shure the whole camp with this here ruler!"
 
2013-04-18 02:29:42 PM  

limeyferg: aluminum... somehow becomes Al- u-min-i-um

The -ium is how us Brits say it.  I think Bill Bryson researched it and said the original element was named as -"aluminum: and that's how the US says it and spells it.  For some reason the brits decided that it sounded better if you add the -ium and made it aluminium.


The Brits did something similar with the pronunciation of herb.  "Herb" comes from French and the "h" is silent; originally, the English adhered to the silent "h"---which is why we Americans don't pronounce the it---but then changed their limey minds sometime during the 1800s and decided to pronounce the "h."

Worse, Brits like to think they pronounce "herbs" correctly when, in fact, they're wrong.  I've heard many a Brit say that Americans sound like idiots when they say " 'erb" instead of "herb."

Morans.
 
2013-04-18 02:29:48 PM  
"You don't have permission to access /2008/learn/10-words-you-mispronounce-that-make-people-think-youre-an- idiot on this server."

Guess I'll remain ignint.
 
2013-04-18 02:29:55 PM  
I did it "On accident"

Makes me roll my eyes.

I will use "Unpossible" but really only as a joke.  When someone presents me with a technical question or theory at work, I will all dramatically say "UNPOSSIBLE!"
 
2013-04-18 02:30:54 PM  

FizixJunkee: Strik3r: NUCLEAR
Incorrect pronunciation: nuke - you - lerr

Correct pronunciation: new - clee - err

I'm going to try to get through this one without a President Bush joke. All right, so, despite the fact that it's 2008, this is a word with which we're somehow still struggling. Like most of the words on this list, "nuclear" is spelled EXACTLY AS IT IS SUPPOSED TO BE PRONOUNCED and yet, people continue to screw it up worse than the War in Iraq... oh, dammit.

^^^^  THIS

Same is true for Israel, too, yet so many pronounce it "is ree ahl" instead of "is rah el".


What about Iz-ray-el?
 
2013-04-18 02:31:22 PM  

23FPB23: Thanks in advance, y'all!


New England:
When a person is no longer employed, for whatever reason, it is said that they "got done"
 
2013-04-18 02:32:27 PM  
I am finding this thread whicked retahded.Now, where did I pahk my cah?
 
2013-04-18 02:32:50 PM  

FizixJunkee: Strik3r: NUCLEAR
Incorrect pronunciation: nuke - you - lerr

Correct pronunciation: new - clee - err

I'm going to try to get through this one without a President Bush joke. All right, so, despite the fact that it's 2008, this is a word with which we're somehow still struggling. Like most of the words on this list, "nuclear" is spelled EXACTLY AS IT IS SUPPOSED TO BE PRONOUNCED and yet, people continue to screw it up worse than the War in Iraq... oh, dammit.

^^^^  THIS

Same is true for Israel, too, yet so many pronounce it "is ree ahl" instead of "is rah el".


You mean "Is ray el" or "is rah yel", right?  I'm not sure I've ever heard it with a stop between the a and e for "ah el".
 
2013-04-18 02:33:01 PM  

StickyKleenexWad: I live in St. Clair County AL about 35 min. drive from Talladega ('Dega).  The drawl & language on the factory floor at my last job would probably make most of ya'll internet folks' ears fall off.   "I gotta git down to tha doller stoar 'fore Misty gits off her shift at tha cracker Barrel. We gon git some coors lite & go to tha races"  Also, Row Tide ya'll.


So what was y'all makin' thar in that factry?  Trailer houses or cabinets?
 
2013-04-18 02:33:24 PM  

Oldiron_79: Dont forget people that pronounce Missouri Missourah.


I have friends from that state and they always refer to it as Misery.

/I know it's kind of a pun rather than a mispronunciation, but it's amusing nonetheless.
 
2013-04-18 02:34:15 PM  
words that when you say them make people think you're from Alabama

Cousinwife
sisterfarker


I know I must be missing a few
 
2013-04-18 02:34:46 PM  
i.chzbgr.comView Full Size
 
2013-04-18 02:36:08 PM  

hubiestubert: "Proper" English is no more than the dialect that is used by those in current power, and taught as being the "correct" version, as a method of cultural control. It is a device of politics, not linguistics


There are thousands of dialects of English.   "Official" forms of English are just those dialects which have an army and navy behind them.

/always loved that definition.
 
2013-04-18 02:36:47 PM  
Ore-e-gone.
 
2013-04-18 02:36:50 PM  
People say Louisville like "lewellville" to my ears.

I recently read it as "Lewisville" before I realized I was wrong.

/have no reason to visit that part of the country.
 
2013-04-18 02:36:56 PM  

FrancoFile: Strik3r: NUCLEAR
Incorrect pronunciation: nuke - you - lerr

Correct pronunciation: new - clee - err

I'm going to try to get through this one without a President Bush joke. All right, so, despite the fact that it's 2008, this is a word with which we're somehow still struggling. Like most of the words on this list, "nuclear" is spelled EXACTLY AS IT IS SUPPOSED TO BE PRONOUNCED and yet, people continue to screw it up worse than the War in Iraq... oh, dammit.

^^^^  THIS

There's an obvious explanation for this.

"nuke" is shorthand for "cook in the microwave".  Everyone says "nuke" a dozen times a week.  Then they try to transition back to the root word, and can't shove the 'l' into that first syllable.

"nuke" - "ular"  is like jocular, ocular, popular, etc.


So, do these people really think there is a nulear weapon in their microwave ?????

Also, I can't say I've ever tried or heard of anyone trying to "joc" or "oc" something. I have heard of people who like to "pop" someone, but again there, I see no similarity other than the sounds the three letters make..........

/you are white knighting for "nucular" ????
 
2013-04-18 02:37:30 PM  

Strik3r: NUCLEAR
Incorrect pronunciation: nuke - you - lerr

Correct pronunciation: new - clee - err

I'm going to try to get through this one without a President Bush joke. All right, so, despite the fact that it's 2008, this is a word with which we're somehow still struggling. Like most of the words on this list, "nuclear" is spelled EXACTLY AS IT IS SUPPOSED TO BE PRONOUNCED and yet, people continue to screw it up worse than the War in Iraq... oh, dammit.

^^^^  THIS


I work in the god damn nuclear industry and HALF MY GOD DAMN COWORKERS SAY NOOKYOULAR.

I've heard reactor operators say nookyoular! Christ, can we just drop this one! It's regional, deal with it!

On this topic, turbine. "Turban" or "tur-byne"?

/turban
 
2013-04-18 02:38:05 PM  

Ctrl-Alt-Del: words that when you say them make people think you're from Alabama

Cousinwife
sisterfarker


I know I must be missing a few


Get away from my cousinwife you filthy sisterfarker!
 
2013-04-18 02:38:21 PM  
Remember proper southern pronunciation for places in the South,

Atlanta=Etlanna
Louisville=LooeyVull (this applies to all cities ending in Ville)
Mobile=MoBeel
Florida=Floor-Duh
Louisana=LoozeyAnna
NewOrleans=Norlins
etc
 
2013-04-18 02:38:23 PM  

FizixJunkee: [i.chzbgr.com image 456x570]


"Wheel barrel" is a fine example of an eggcorn.
 
2013-04-18 02:38:25 PM  
 
2013-04-18 02:38:41 PM  
Help me make some decent grits?.
 
2013-04-18 02:39:07 PM  
Brass Tacks.


Not Brass Tax.

/just learned that one about a year ago
 
2013-04-18 02:39:12 PM  
The beauty of the English language *is* mispronunciation.  Which itself is a misnomer, in a way.  Regional dialects are the evolution of our language.

If we spoke "proper" English, we'd have to go back many, many centuries to figure out how to speak "correctly".

Even the most well-spoken person is essentially speaking complete slang... relative to the roots of the language.
 
2013-04-18 02:42:21 PM  

Ringshadow: Strik3r: NUCLEAR
Incorrect pronunciation: nuke - you - lerr

Correct pronunciation: new - clee - err

I'm going to try to get through this one without a President Bush joke. All right, so, despite the fact that it's 2008, this is a word with which we're somehow still struggling. Like most of the words on this list, "nuclear" is spelled EXACTLY AS IT IS SUPPOSED TO BE PRONOUNCED and yet, people continue to screw it up worse than the War in Iraq... oh, dammit.

^^^^  THIS

I work in the god damn nuclear industry and HALF MY GOD DAMN COWORKERS SAY NOOKYOULAR.

I've heard reactor operators say nookyoular! Christ, can we just drop this one! It's regional, deal with it!

On this topic, turbine. "Turban" or "tur-byne"?

/turban


I say NO.

If you want to create a new word for each ("nucular" and/or "turban"), fine. Just leave "nuclear" and "turbine" alone. Back away and pronounce them properly.
 
2013-04-18 02:42:24 PM  

downstairs: If we spoke "proper" English, we'd have to go back many, many centuries to figure out how to speak "correctly".


Well, no. As stated upthread, "proper" is whatever the ruling classes say it is.
 
2013-04-18 02:43:16 PM  
Perscription, Perogative and ofTen are common to Southern California natives.
 
2013-04-18 02:44:12 PM  
FLMountainMan:
The way they and Long Islanders speak have to be the ugliest pronunciations of English anywhere.  Just awful.

The Kiwis and Ozzies disagree with you.  Diphthongs everywhere, including in words where no other English speaker has every managed to insert a diphthong.

Ref: How Australians say "no."  Apparently, a, e, i, o, and u are all pronounced in this simple word.
 
2013-04-18 02:44:51 PM  

Strik3r: FrancoFile: Strik3r: NUCLEAR
Incorrect pronunciation: nuke - you - lerr

Correct pronunciation: new - clee - err

I'm going to try to get through this one without a President Bush joke. All right, so, despite the fact that it's 2008, this is a word with which we're somehow still struggling. Like most of the words on this list, "nuclear" is spelled EXACTLY AS IT IS SUPPOSED TO BE PRONOUNCED and yet, people continue to screw it up worse than the War in Iraq... oh, dammit.

^^^^  THIS

There's an obvious explanation for this.

"nuke" is shorthand for "cook in the microwave".  Everyone says "nuke" a dozen times a week.  Then they try to transition back to the root word, and can't shove the 'l' into that first syllable.

"nuke" - "ular"  is like jocular, ocular, popular, etc.

So, do these people really think there is a nulear weapon in their microwave ?????

Also, I can't say I've ever tried or heard of anyone trying to "joc" or "oc" something. I have heard of people who like to "pop" someone, but again there, I see no similarity other than the sounds the three letters make..........

/you are white knighting for "nucular" ????


Explaining, not white knighting.

No, there is no fission weapon in their oven, but where are you from that you don't hear 'nuke' as slang for 'heat in a microwave oven'.
 
2013-04-18 02:46:19 PM  
I do get annoyed when people put a T in "else". I hear that a lot.
 
2013-04-18 02:46:30 PM  

CygnusDarius: Help me make some decent grits?.


Lots of cheese and butter.  Little bit of pepper and Texas Pete.  Nothin' to it.
 
2013-04-18 02:47:28 PM  
No supposably?
 
2013-04-18 02:48:08 PM  
despite the fact that it's 2008

it is?  i didn't realize i fell asleep in a time machine last night and went back 5 years
 
2013-04-18 02:48:15 PM  

El Brujo: People say Louisville like "lewellville" to my ears.

I recently read it as "Lewisville" before I realized I was wrong.

/have no reason to visit that part of the country.


The colloquial pronunciation is closer to "lvll". The fewer vowel sounds, the better.

kaduh: Ore-e-gone.


I would like to posit "Organ".

/My hobby: working both "aluminium" and "turlet" into my lexicon
 
2013-04-18 02:48:21 PM  

AdrienVeidt: FizixJunkee: Strik3r: NUCLEAR
Incorrect pronunciation: nuke - you - lerr

Correct pronunciation: new - clee - err

I'm going to try to get through this one without a President Bush joke. All right, so, despite the fact that it's 2008, this is a word with which we're somehow still struggling. Like most of the words on this list, "nuclear" is spelled EXACTLY AS IT IS SUPPOSED TO BE PRONOUNCED and yet, people continue to screw it up worse than the War in Iraq... oh, dammit.

^^^^  THIS

Same is true for Israel, too, yet so many pronounce it "is ree ahl" instead of "is rah el".

What about Iz-ray-el?


That's acceptable.  What's not acceptable is reversing the "a" and "e".  Israel ends in "-el".
 
2013-04-18 02:48:34 PM  

FizixJunkee: FLMountainMan:
The way they and Long Islanders speak have to be the ugliest pronunciations of English anywhere.  Just awful.

The Kiwis and Ozzies disagree with you.  Diphthongs everywhere, including in words where no other English speaker has every managed to insert a diphthong.

Ref: How Australians say "no."  Apparently, a, e, i, o, and u are all pronounced in this simple word.


Dipthong-ing and un-dipthong-ing are common features of the Southern pronunciation.

"Shrimp boil"  to most of America is 2 syllables followed by 1 syllable.
In Alabama, it's 1 syllable followed by 2.  "Shree-imp bowl"
 
2013-04-18 02:48:52 PM  
sandrich
 
2013-04-18 02:49:04 PM  

rugman11: I wouldn't worry about it unless you also pronounce locale as "LOC-al" and morale as "MOR-al."


I shall immediately process to my study, so that I may process this new information!
 
2013-04-18 02:49:24 PM  
Thus, behold, People of the Internet...

Thus, behold, author:

off - ten (ɔft
 
2013-04-18 02:49:43 PM  
I like the part where the article doesn't know how to properly pronounce et cetera. It's a hard C, not a soft C, you idiots! et KET-er-ah!
 
2013-04-18 02:49:44 PM  
The VP of my company says MUTE and not MOOT.   College Edge-a-bacated people.
 
2013-04-18 02:49:47 PM  
No mention of "I axed you a question?"

I know a guy who pronounces the B in subtle.

PS  There's no R on the end of Cuba.  It's Cuba, not cuber.
 
2013-04-18 02:49:56 PM  

TheDumbBlonde: Louisville=LooeyVull (this applies to all cities ending in Ville)


I heard this mostly as LOO-vull or LOO-uh-vull.
 
2013-04-18 02:50:14 PM  

FirstNationalBastard: Oh, and I still don't see how the Brits get "leftenant" out of "lieutenant".


That seems leftover from Greek. Eu and au are pronounced ev and av in certain situations. Likely I am wrong.

Euxaristo.
 
2013-04-18 02:50:18 PM  

DaddyRat: Bless your hearts.


fark you too.

/speaks some southern
 
2013-04-18 02:50:18 PM  
OK, just got my comment cut off for some reason.

My point was that off - ten is correct in England.
 
2013-04-18 02:50:33 PM  

FizixJunkee: That's acceptable.  What's not acceptable is reversing the "a" and "e".  Israel ends in "-el


Jeruslahem.
 
2013-04-18 02:50:35 PM  

FizixJunkee: Strik3r: NUCLEAR
Incorrect pronunciation: nuke - you - lerr

Correct pronunciation: new - clee - err

I'm going to try to get through this one without a President Bush joke. All right, so, despite the fact that it's 2008, this is a word with which we're somehow still struggling. Like most of the words on this list, "nuclear" is spelled EXACTLY AS IT IS SUPPOSED TO BE PRONOUNCED and yet, people continue to screw it up worse than the War in Iraq... oh, dammit.

^^^^  THIS

Same is true for Israel, too, yet so many pronounce it "is ree ahl" instead of "is rah el".


Reminds me of this:

"Then turning around, I saw this kid yacking it up for the crowd, obviously having a blast with this ugly Jew-hating sign. And what does that mean, "SASQUATCH ISRAEL"? This is a play on the "legitimacy myth" of Israel's existence. As there's of course a "Sasquatch myth," it's worth noting the implied comparison: that Israel is also an ape-like beast existing only in historical folklore. Absent legitimacy, Israel has "no right to exist." This kid's sign is but one more example of eliminationist anti-Semitism. And look at how overjoyed he is in boasting this hatred. Creepy"

sadlyno.comView Full Size
 
2013-04-18 02:50:38 PM  
My wife doesn't have much of an accent, but she does say:

might could - might
holler - hollow
waller - wallow
tarry

And one thing that made me laugh is I played on an all Latino soccer team here and they called me "Blanco Americano".  This seemed stupid - seven syllables.
FLMM:  why not just say "Americano"?
L:  Because some of us are Americanos.
F:  What about just "Blanco"?
L:  Because some of us are blanco.
F:  Fine, why not gringo, or gabacho?
L:  No, no, no.  That would be racist.
F:  Alright....
 
2013-04-18 02:50:46 PM  

ChrisDe: sandrich


Good point.  It's sammidge.
 
2013-04-18 02:51:57 PM  
Bruce Campbell:supposably?

marrettcounseling.comView Full Size
 
2013-04-18 02:52:11 PM  

El Brujo: People say Louisville like "lewellville" to my ears.

I recently read it as "Lewisville" before I realized I was wrong.

/have no reason to visit that part of the country.


In Ohio we have a town called Louisville that's pronounced Lewisville.

Confusingly, we also have a town called Lewisville.
 
2013-04-18 02:52:57 PM  
This is stupid. The way people speak is in no way a reflection of intelligence. If you think so then you are probably some idiot northern liberal. Dialect is something that is engrained in a person since child birth. Often this includes so called mispronunciation.

It isn't something thats easy to change.

Grammar in writing is something to judge people on. Judging somebody on different (incorrect or not) ways of pronunciation is just stupid. And I think most linguists would agree.

Slutter McGee
 
2013-04-18 02:53:11 PM  

Sweaty Dynamite: Pocket Ninja: Subby, most of the incorrect pronunciations listed on that page would mark a significant improvement in pronunciation for Alabamians.


Where's the "i" at?


Or, where is the "i"?
 
2013-04-18 02:56:20 PM  

Inflatable Rhetoric: ChrisDe: sandrich

Good point.  It's sammidge.


Sangwich
 
2013-04-18 02:56:40 PM  

FrancoFile: Strik3r: FrancoFile: Strik3r: NUCLEAR
Incorrect pronunciation: nuke - you - lerr

Correct pronunciation: new - clee - err

I'm going to try to get through this one without a President Bush joke. All right, so, despite the fact that it's 2008, this is a word with which we're somehow still struggling. Like most of the words on this list, "nuclear" is spelled EXACTLY AS IT IS SUPPOSED TO BE PRONOUNCED and yet, people continue to screw it up worse than the War in Iraq... oh, dammit.

^^^^  THIS

There's an obvious explanation for this.

"nuke" is shorthand for "cook in the microwave".  Everyone says "nuke" a dozen times a week.  Then they try to transition back to the root word, and can't shove the 'l' into that first syllable.

"nuke" - "ular"  is like jocular, ocular, popular, etc.

So, do these people really think there is a nulear weapon in their microwave ?????

Also, I can't say I've ever tried or heard of anyone trying to "joc" or "oc" something. I have heard of people who like to "pop" someone, but again there, I see no similarity other than the sounds the three letters make..........

/you are white knighting for "nucular" ????

Explaining, not white knighting.

No, there is no fission weapon in their oven, but where are you from that you don't hear 'nuke' as slang for 'heat in a microwave oven'.


I was just "smart-mouthin" text style.....

For some reason, I think language would be a lot more condusive to spoken communication if we could (those of us who use a common language) at least agree on how to pronounce the written words.

...strange....   I know......
 
2013-04-18 02:57:46 PM  

El Brujo: I do get annoyed when people put a T in "else". I hear that a lot.


Ha!  A friend of mine adds it to the end of "across".  We have teased him for twenty five years about it and he just doesn't give a shiate.  He's from Indianner.
 
2013-04-18 02:57:56 PM  
the quality of blogging has achieved new heighths.

rulefortytwo.comView Full Size


/approves
 
2013-04-18 02:59:06 PM  

El Brujo: People say Louisville like "lewellville" to my ears.

I recently read it as "Lewisville" before I realized I was wrong.

/have no reason to visit that part of the country.


Until today, I described it as "lulvul", but the person who said "lvll" is more accurate.

Anyway, since you have no reason to visit there, it shouldn't matter how words are said. Right, Ell Brew-Joe?
 
2013-04-18 02:59:30 PM  
Also, teh Brits are dumb when they say 'Hoo-stun'. This is one time Stewie's right; it's 'Hyuu-stun', dammit.
 
2013-04-18 03:00:03 PM  
It's only sherbet if that's the way you spell it.


Slutter McGee: The way people speak is in no way a reflection of intelligence


actually it's the greatest reflection of intellect. The manner in which one speaks is in turn reflected in their writing.
 
2013-04-18 03:02:16 PM  

Strik3r: NUCLEAR
Incorrect pronunciation: nuke - you - lerr

Correct pronunciation: new - clee - err

I'm going to try to get through this one without a President Bush joke. All right, so, despite the fact that it's 2008, this is a word with which we're somehow still struggling. Like most of the words on this list, "nuclear" is spelled EXACTLY AS IT IS SUPPOSED TO BE PRONOUNCED and yet, people continue to screw it up worse than the War in Iraq... oh, dammit.

^^^^  THIS


1.bp.blogspot.comView Full Size



Nuclear Lisa, it's pronounced nuclear.
 
2013-04-18 03:03:14 PM  
It's my prerogative.
 
2013-04-18 03:03:27 PM  

namegoeshere: This one I've noticed in the northeast. It's subtle, but "dr" at the beginning of words turns into "jr". Drop becomes jrop.


After repeating that word a couple of times, I realize you're right.  Funny, that. Never noticed it before.

.
 
2013-04-18 03:04:03 PM  
Awry and a rye are the same word?  I always thought the latter was just some weird colloquialism. Learn something new every day.
 
2013-04-18 03:04:10 PM  

tuna fingers: vudukungfu: OK OK OK
PRIMER Magazine.

Is it pronounced
PRIM-MER
or
PRIME-ER?

Good call.
To me it is the latter.  To old librarians it is the former.


The former is an American pronunciation, the latter British (and Commonwealth).
 
2013-04-18 03:04:36 PM  

Pants full of macaroni!!: El Brujo: People say Louisville like "lewellville" to my ears.

I recently read it as "Lewisville" before I realized I was wrong.

/have no reason to visit that part of the country.

In Ohio we have a town called Louisville that's pronounced Lewisville.

Confusingly, we also have a town called Lewisville.


Well, continuing on the Alabama run, there's Eutaw (pronounced like "Utah") and Arab, pronounced A-rab.
 
2013-04-18 03:05:33 PM  
I grew up in Alabama and I don't mispronounce any of those words. I don't know anyone who does. The joke about Alabama is tired and pathetic. I have heard people mispronounce realtor and nuclear in every state I've been too and on many television programs. It irritates me to no end. Ignorance and laziness are human traits not southern traits.
 
2013-04-18 03:05:33 PM  
Ohio:

Indians:  "in-dins"
Washington:  "worshington"
Hawaii:  "ha-why-yuh"
 
2013-04-18 03:06:07 PM  

rugman11: FTFY

And yes, they would, as do Alabamian immigrants.



I will consult my expert, an Alabama immigrant who is now an expat, living in Georgia and contemplating a move to Florida.
 
2013-04-18 03:06:25 PM  
karenjlloyd.comView Full Size


"es-ca-pe"....
 
2013-04-18 03:06:36 PM  
I'm with him on all of them but "often", I don't think I know anyone who pronounces it "offen", nor do I have any recollection of hearing that it is supposed to be a "silent t" prior to this article.
 
2013-04-18 03:06:51 PM  
Y'all is a perfectly cromulent word:

upload.wikimedia.orgView Full Size


If you ketch my drift.

25.media.tumblr.comView Full Size
 
2013-04-18 03:07:40 PM  

Gonz: El Brujo: People say Louisville like "lewellville" to my ears.

I recently read it as "Lewisville" before I realized I was wrong.

/have no reason to visit that part of the country.

Until today, I described it as "lulvul", but the person who said "lvll" is more accurate.

Anyway, since you have no reason to visit there, it shouldn't matter how words are said. Right, Ell Brew-Joe?


Yep. I have family in IL, so that is the closest I get to that part of the country. Among the worst weather on planet earth. Illinois included in that sentiment.
 
2013-04-18 03:07:56 PM  
grain of salt or grain assault?
 
2013-04-18 03:08:44 PM  

Dead for Tax Reasons: despite the fact that it's 2008

it is?  i didn't realize i fell asleep in a time machine last night and went back 5 years


I see I'm not the only one who noticed this.

/old grammar lessons are SO EXCITING
 
2013-04-18 03:09:40 PM  

timujin: I'm with him on all of them but "often", I don't think I know anyone who pronounces it "offen", nor do I have any recollection of hearing that it is supposed to be a "silent t" prior to this article.


Kind of like how "receipt" has a silent 'p'.

....

Unlike me first thing in the morning.

HEY-OH
 
2013-04-18 03:09:42 PM  

namegoeshere: HortusMatris: puckrock2000: netcentric: "If you're using words like "snuck," "brang," or "irregardless," (no, none of those are real words)...  "

Wtf ?   That's unpossible.

H'aint ?

Well, according to the Random House Dictionary, "First recorded in writing toward the end of the 19th century in the United States, snuck has become in recent decades a standard variant past tense and past participle of the verb sneak".
So if people have been using it that way for over a century, then yes, it's a real word.

^This^

Snuck is so a real word!

I'll give you snuck, but goddammitsomuch I will never surrender to "irregardless!"


http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/irregardless

Irregardless of the fact it's been around 100 years?
 
2013-04-18 03:10:07 PM  

timujin: I'm with him on all of them but "often", I don't think I know anyone who pronounces it "offen", nor do I have any recollection of hearing that it is supposed to be a "silent t" prior to this article.


that being said, I don't pronounce it "off TEN" as much as "off tn"

And according to Random House:
Often' was pronounced with a t-sound until the 17th century, when a pronunciation without the [t] came to predominate in the speech of the educated, in both North America and Great Britain, and the earlier pronunciation fell into disfavor. Common use of a spelling pronunciation has since restored the [t] for many speakers, and today /ˈɔfən/[aw-fuh and /ˈɔf[awf-tuhn] or /ˈɒfən/[of-uhn] and [of-tuhn] exist side by side. Although it is still sometimes criticized, 'often' with a /t/[t] is now so widely heard from educated speakers that it has become fully standard once again.
 
2013-04-18 03:10:32 PM  

MisterTweak: 11. Discrete (meaning, two of more individual things or events) vs. discreet (meaning let's not let our spouses find out about this...)


Those are pronounced the same. Spelling is down the hall; this is pronunciation.

Here's one: valet. It's not French, it's English, and it's pronounced VALL-et.

People in Alabama don't mispronounce often. People in Long Island do. They say Ooawf-ten and really bang on the t.
 
2013-04-18 03:11:30 PM  

El Brujo: People say Louisville like "lewellville" to my ears.

I recently read it as "Lewisville" before I realized I was wrong.

/have no reason to visit that part of the country.


It's sad if you're so close-minded you wouldn't even think about going there.I've been all over the country and a few places overseas.  Louisville is one of my favorite cities.  Seriously, I'd put it in my top five (probably would go Miami, Granada Nicaragua, DC, Savannah, then Louisville). Great people, really cool architecture, tons of bourbons at every bar, I was really surprised how much I liked it.
 
2013-04-18 03:11:37 PM  
I lived in the south for several years and enjoyed mockery of southerners. These posts are all funny to me.

Just as long as you realize it's bigotry, the same as when directed at any other group. We are all the same.
 
2013-04-18 03:11:49 PM  

AdrienVeidt: Also, teh Brits are dumb when they say 'Hoo-stun'. This is one time Stewie's right; it's 'Hyuu-stun', dammit.


Unless yer from New Yawk - then it How-stun
 
2013-04-18 03:12:26 PM  

FizixJunkee: Ref: How Australians say "no." Apparently, a, e, i, o, and u are all pronounced in this simple word.


Ha!  So true.  1/2 my family lives there.  "no" goes something like "noaye!"

We make fun of each others accents when they visit.  Apparently they think Americans talk funny too.

/All in good fun
 
2013-04-18 03:12:29 PM  

I want your skull: namegoeshere: Crayfish, crawfish, crawdads, craydads, craydiddies, little tiny fresh water lobsters...

Mud bugs.



Langostino.
 
2013-04-18 03:13:07 PM  

Sweaty Dynamite: StickyKleenexWad: I live in St. Clair County AL about 35 min. drive from Talladega ('Dega).  The drawl & language on the factory floor at my last job would probably make most of ya'll internet folks' ears fall off.   "I gotta git down to tha doller stoar 'fore Misty gits off her shift at tha cracker Barrel. We gon git some coors lite & go to tha races"  Also, Row Tide ya'll.

So what was y'all makin' thar in that factry?  Trailer houses or cabinets?


Spice blends, actually.  & I didn't work on the factory floor, I was in the office.  A real low-class act girl used to always be afraid when we had storms.  When the tornadoes of 4/27/2011 came through (same ones as Tuscaloosa) that girl lost her trailer & everything & was hospitalized for I'm not even sure how long.  Since then I always respect (storms in general too) someone's fear of storms b/c while you or I may have somewhere secure to go... not everybody does.
 
2013-04-18 03:13:14 PM  

cretinbob: It's only sherbet if that's the way you spell it.


Slutter McGee: The way people speak is in no way a reflection of intelligence

actually it's the greatest reflection of intellect. The manner in which one speaks is in turn reflected in their writing.


Not necessarily. One may be able to present an argument in a coherent manner, with proper spelling and grammar. For instance, take the previous statement. If you were to hear me say it, it would likely sound along the lines of "Wun may be abl'ta pruhsent an ahguamint inna coherrent mannah, wit propah spellin' n' grammah." Looking at the two examples, one can see that the writing in generally considered proper, however, the pronunciation makes me sound like a swamp yankee. Which I am. If anything, I would posit it's due to the average cadence of the typical resident of lower New England. We have a tendency to speed through a sentence. As a result, we take verbal shortcuts and slur the sounds together. To my ears it sounds like proper English, as it's the environment I was raised. To someone outside that locality I would sound like a unintelligible swamp yankee. But I covered that earlier in the post. In short, the manner in which one speaks is not necessarily reflected in writing, and yer a poop head.
 
2013-04-18 03:13:30 PM  

HalfOffOffer: grain of salt or grain assault?


grain assault?


1.bp.blogspot.comView Full Size


You gonna get raped.

 
2013-04-18 03:14:12 PM  
I like minor mispronunciations.  My mother pronounces wash as "warsh" and it drives the grammar nazis up the wall.  Funny part is, my mom's a lifelong local of her state, and it's the out of staters that are driven nutty by it.
 
2013-04-18 03:14:21 PM  

xanadian: timujin: I'm with him on all of them but "often", I don't think I know anyone who pronounces it "offen", nor do I have any recollection of hearing that it is supposed to be a "silent t" prior to this article.

Kind of like how "receipt" has a silent 'p'.

....

Unlike me first thing in the morning.

HEY-OH


Sure, but I'd always been told that was how to correctly pronounce receipt.  (not to detract from your amusing play on words)

As I posted just above, the writer is apparently being recalcitrant, digging in his heels and ignoring the evolution the language continually goes through.

I actually have a similar issue with "nauseous" and "begs the question", but I've learned to let it go.
 
2013-04-18 03:15:35 PM  

Inflatable Rhetoric: ChrisDe: sandrich

Good point.  It's sammidge.


No, it's "Sangwich"
 
2013-04-18 03:15:53 PM  

FizixJunkee: Strik3r: NUCLEAR
Incorrect pronunciation: nuke - you - lerr

Correct pronunciation: new - clee - err

I'm going to try to get through this one without a President Bush joke. All right, so, despite the fact that it's 2008, this is a word with which we're somehow still struggling. Like most of the words on this list, "nuclear" is spelled EXACTLY AS IT IS SUPPOSED TO BE PRONOUNCED and yet, people continue to screw it up worse than the War in Iraq... oh, dammit.

^^^^  THIS

Same is true for Israel, too, yet so many pronounce it "is ree ahl" instead of "is rah el".


In the South, it's pronounced IZZ-rull.
 
2013-04-18 03:16:47 PM  

FLMountainMan: My wife doesn't have much of an accent, but she does say:

holler - hollow


That's a new one on me.  Around here, "holler" is how you get someone's attention if they ignore you the first time.
 
2013-04-18 03:16:58 PM  

rugman11: Pants full of macaroni!!: El Brujo: People say Louisville like "lewellville" to my ears.

I recently read it as "Lewisville" before I realized I was wrong.

/have no reason to visit that part of the country.

In Ohio we have a town called Louisville that's pronounced Lewisville.

Confusingly, we also have a town called Lewisville.

Well, continuing on the Alabama run, there's Eutaw (pronounced like "Utah") and Arab, pronounced A-rab.


My BIL is from Eutaw, and I have actually had the misfortune of spending a Thanksgiving is LA. Kentucky has Versailles (Ver-Sales) and Georgia has Layfayette (La-fay-et). Georgia also has Forsyth County (For-Sight) and Forsythe Park (For-Sighth). We be crazy down here.
 
2013-04-18 03:17:22 PM  

FizixJunkee: What about Iz-ray-el?

That's acceptable. What's not acceptable is reversing the "a" and "e". Israel ends in "-el".


From the Hebrew "Yisrael", which has the same dipthong going on. There is a tendency in Semitic languages (only knowing Hebrew but being very familiar with the sound of both Arabic and Hebrew spoken by native Arabic-speakers, I assume this is the case) to vocalize an apostrophe in between two vowels, so "Israel"/"Yisrael" becomes "Isra'el"/"Yisra'el".

I hate when people pronounce the last syllable as "real".
 
2013-04-18 03:17:33 PM  

maxx2112: Roll Tide


That is the definitive answer.
 
2013-04-18 03:17:51 PM  
This is kind of like how all Southerners pronounce Pepsi, Sprite, Seltzer, RC, Mr. Pibb, Root Beer, Nehi, Orange Crush, etc. all the same way..."Coke."
 
2013-04-18 03:18:08 PM  

ristst: Oldiron_79: Dont forget people that pronounce Missouri Missourah.

I have friends from that state and they always refer to it as Misery.

/I know it's kind of a pun rather than a mispronunciation, but it's amusing nonetheless.


The Missour-ee/Missou-ruh thing is, if I recall correctly, a leftover from the Little Dixie migration in the 1830s-1850s or whenever after statehood. Basically, all these planters from the upper south (Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee) moved due west and colonized the north bank of the Missouri river and brought their drawls, slaves, hemp, and tobacco along. The "ee" pronunciation was the original native pronunciation, but southerners modified it after they moved in.

That's from some apocryphal crap I picked up somewhere, though, so I don't have a source. Everybody and their mother passed through Missouri at some point in the country's history, though, so who knows where it mutated.
 
2013-04-18 03:19:06 PM  
"Oft-ten" is a major pet peeve of mine, but it's become so common that I sound uneducated for pronouncing it "offen."

On the other hand, I got so used to saying "lie-berry" for library, in an ironic, Homer Simpson type voice, that I now use that pronunciation automatically.  My seven year-old corrected me on it, FFS!  Yes, son, Daddy talks like he's in kindergarten...just aks anyone.
 
2013-04-18 03:19:51 PM  
also AFF-lete
 
2013-04-18 03:19:59 PM  
"Onvelope" - because you're not The Queen, but you dress like her on the weekends.
 
2013-04-18 03:20:07 PM  

FLMountainMan: El Brujo: People say Louisville like "lewellville" to my ears.

I recently read it as "Lewisville" before I realized I was wrong.

/have no reason to visit that part of the country.

It's sad if you're so close-minded you wouldn't even think about going there.I've been all over the country and a few places overseas.  Louisville is one of my favorite cities.  Seriously, I'd put it in my top five (probably would go Miami, Granada Nicaragua, DC, Savannah, then Louisville). Great people, really cool architecture, tons of bourbons at every bar, I was really surprised how much I liked it.


I'm sure it's got it's qualities. Most places do. I've visited almost every state (KY too), but there are only a few I feel the need to rerun to. I'd go if I had a reason to, I suppose.
 
2013-04-18 03:21:24 PM  
And don't get me started on those who insist that "almonds" really rhymes with "Hammonds."
 
2013-04-18 03:21:37 PM  

downstairs: FizixJunkee: Ref: How Australians say "no." Apparently, a, e, i, o, and u are all pronounced in this simple word.

Ha!  So true.  1/2 my family lives there.  "no" goes something like "noaye!"

We make fun of each others accents when they visit.  Apparently they think Americans talk funny too.

/All in good fun


My friends that are local to Houston, Texas say "U-ston".
 
2013-04-18 03:23:06 PM  
Putting an 'r' in a word that doesn't have one pisses me off. "Warsh my car."
My God.
 
2013-04-18 03:23:23 PM  

FrancoFile: Strik3r: NUCLEAR
Incorrect pronunciation: nuke - you - lerr

Correct pronunciation: new - clee - err

I'm going to try to get through this one without a President Bush joke. All right, so, despite the fact that it's 2008, this is a word with which we're somehow still struggling. Like most of the words on this list, "nuclear" is spelled EXACTLY AS IT IS SUPPOSED TO BE PRONOUNCED and yet, people continue to screw it up worse than the War in Iraq... oh, dammit.

^^^^  THIS

There's an obvious explanation for this.

"nuke" is shorthand for "cook in the microwave".  Everyone says "nuke" a dozen times a week.  Then they try to transition back to the root word, and can't shove the 'l' into that first syllable.

"nuke" - "ular"  is like jocular, ocular, popular, etc.


There is no L in the first syllable of nuclear.
 
2013-04-18 03:23:59 PM  

AdrienVeidt: Water != Wooder.


Of course not. It's WAR dur. You use it to do the WARSH. (at least in South Jersey)
 
2013-04-18 03:26:08 PM  
If you pronounce 'Pepsi' or 'Mountain Dew' as 'Coke', you might be from Alabama...
 
2013-04-18 03:27:45 PM  

puckrock2000: netcentric: "If you're using words like "snuck," "brang," or "irregardless," (no, none of those are real words)...  "

Wtf ?   That's unpossible.

H'aint ?

Well, according to the Random House Dictionary, "First recorded in writing toward the end of the 19th century in the United States, snuck has become in recent decades a standard variant past tense and past participle of the verb sneak".
So if people have been using it that way for over a century, then yes, it's a real word.


'Snuck' is a perfectly cromulent word.
 
2013-04-18 03:27:55 PM  

Mr Guy: FLMountainMan: My wife doesn't have much of an accent, but she does say:

holler - hollow

That's a new one on me.  Around here, "holler" is how you get someone's attention if they ignore you the first time.


It is an Appalachian-ism, and it is correspondingly ancient (well, in US terms)
 
2013-04-18 03:28:03 PM  
Des Plaines, IL
Des Moines, IA
 
2013-04-18 03:28:34 PM  
Dude needs to pour a cup of purple drank and chill.
 
2013-04-18 03:28:39 PM  
Then there's my Canadian friend who insists on pronouncing "pasta" like "Shasta."   Of course, I cut him slack precisely because he's from Canada.
 
2013-04-18 03:28:46 PM  
I read FTA...I don't understand the quession.

/It's "QUESTION", people!
//With a 'T'
///peeve...not necessarily pet
 
2013-04-18 03:29:02 PM  
 one from the north I know commonly mispronounced: Massachusetts

Way everyone else pronounces: Mass-a-chew-sits

A native from there: Mass-a-too-sets
 
2013-04-18 03:29:32 PM  

CheekyMonkey: puckrock2000: netcentric: "If you're using words like "snuck," "brang," or "irregardless," (no, none of those are real words)...  "

Wtf ?   That's unpossible.

H'aint ?

Well, according to the Random House Dictionary, "First recorded in writing toward the end of the 19th century in the United States, snuck has become in recent decades a standard variant past tense and past participle of the verb sneak".
So if people have been using it that way for over a century, then yes, it's a real word.

'Snuck' is a perfectly cromulent word.


I am embiggened by that.
 
2013-04-18 03:29:53 PM  
Realtor

Wrong:  Ree-la-tor
Correct: Reel-tor

"Alls I know" v. "All I know"
 
2013-04-18 03:30:33 PM  
Common words that when you say them make people think you're from Alabama African American

ASK

Incorrect: Ax

Correct: ASS KUH
 
2013-04-18 03:31:34 PM  

tripleseven: Inflatable Rhetoric: ChrisDe: sandrich

Good point.  It's sammidge.

No, it's "Sangwich"


He just smiled, and gave me a Vegemite Sand Wedge...
 
2013-04-18 03:32:02 PM  
Splenda is a brand of artificial sweetener. it is not "splender"

"lets get situated"... do you put an apostrophe in that? I use it all the time... Its "let us"... I have never figured out how to properly edit it.
 
2013-04-18 03:32:08 PM  

ph0rk: Mr Guy: FLMountainMan: My wife doesn't have much of an accent, but she does say:

holler - hollow

That's a new one on me.  Around here, "holler" is how you get someone's attention if they ignore you the first time.

It is an Appalachian-ism, and it is correspondingly ancient (well, in US terms)


Seems like it needs to be used with the southern pronoun, "them/that-thar".

As in, "Gimme one of themthar holler jugs for mah whis-skay".
 
2013-04-18 03:33:59 PM  

brandent: namegoeshere: HortusMatris: puckrock2000: netcentric: "If you're using words like "snuck," "brang," or "irregardless," (no, none of those are real words)...  "

Wtf ?   That's unpossible.

H'aint ?

Well, according to the Random House Dictionary, "First recorded in writing toward the end of the 19th century in the United States, snuck has become in recent decades a standard variant past tense and past participle of the verb sneak".
So if people have been using it that way for over a century, then yes, it's a real word.

^This^

Snuck is so a real word!

I'll give you snuck, but goddammitsomuch I will never surrender to "irregardless!"

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/irregardless

Irregardless of the fact it's been around 100 years?


Syphilis has been around a lot longer, but I'm not about to embrace that, either.
 
2013-04-18 03:34:01 PM  

GanjSmokr: I want to pronounce forte (strong point) properly ("fort"), but then people don't know what the hell I'm saying so I end up just pronouncing it incorrectly (like the musical term - "fort-ay").


Geroge Carlin and I agree with you. I say forte (silent e) anyway, just in the hope they'll try and correct me. Of course, most dictionaries now say that both pronounciations are correct. The first pronounciation is still [fort], though.

[for•tay] is a musical term.
 
2013-04-18 03:34:26 PM  

El Brujo: FLMountainMan: El Brujo: People say Louisville like "lewellville" to my ears.

I recently read it as "Lewisville" before I realized I was wrong.

/have no reason to visit that part of the country.

It's sad if you're so close-minded you wouldn't even think about going there.I've been all over the country and a few places overseas.  Louisville is one of my favorite cities.  Seriously, I'd put it in my top five (probably would go Miami, Granada Nicaragua, DC, Savannah, then Louisville). Great people, really cool architecture, tons of bourbons at every bar, I was really surprised how much I liked it.

I'm sure it's got it's qualities. Most places do. I've visited almost every state (KY too), but there are only a few I feel the need to rerun to. I'd go if I had a reason to, I suppose.


If you ever have a reason, check it out.  I had the same expectations you did and was pleasantly surprised.  BTW - love the Pacific NW, especially the Mt. St. Helens area.  I must say though, your white people are really, really, really white.
 
2013-04-18 03:35:29 PM  
"Buck naked" should never be pronounced "butt nekkid".

Also:

Wedding video
Graduation video
Funny YouTube video
Disaster video
Sex  tape?

Almost only
when it's sex does the media and populace at large call a digitally-shot video a "tape".
 
2013-04-18 03:37:26 PM  
In the south: axe=ask
 
2013-04-18 03:38:23 PM  

cbathrob: "Oft-ten" is a major pet peeve of mine, but it's become so common that I sound uneducated for pronouncing it "offen."

On the other hand, I got so used to saying "lie-berry" for library, in an ironic, Homer Simpson type voice, that I now use that pronunciation automatically.  My seven year-old corrected me on it, FFS!  Yes, son, Daddy talks like he's in kindergarten...just aks anyone.


HAHA. Something similar happened to me recently at a party with my intentional use of (should be a word) "boughten"

It was only marginally amusing until  I responded to her quizzical look with a completely deadpan "It's a perfectly cromulent word"
 
2013-04-18 03:38:37 PM  

TheDumbBlonde: downstairs: FizixJunkee: Ref: How Australians say "no." Apparently, a, e, i, o, and u are all pronounced in this simple word.

Ha!  So true.  1/2 my family lives there.  "no" goes something like "noaye!"

We make fun of each others accents when they visit.  Apparently they think Americans talk funny too.

/All in good fun

My friends that are local to Houston, Texas say "U-ston".


Oh God.  Tony Kornheiser says YOU-ston and SARAH-cuse and occasionally makes PTI unwatchable.
 
2013-04-18 03:39:10 PM  

netcentric: "hubiestubert: English is a riotous profusion of forms "

Mrs. Klisher ?


Oddly enough, I do speak Southern in a few forms, from South Carolina, Florida and Louisiana.
 
2013-04-18 03:39:18 PM  

Mr Guy: ph0rk: Mr Guy: FLMountainMan: My wife doesn't have much of an accent, but she does say:

holler - hollow

That's a new one on me.  Around here, "holler" is how you get someone's attention if they ignore you the first time.

It is an Appalachian-ism, and it is correspondingly ancient (well, in US terms)

Seems like it needs to be used with the southern pronoun, "them/that-thar".

As in, "Gimme one of themthar holler jugs for mah whis-skay".


A holler (spelled hollow) is a small valley in the mountains. You live in Beaver Holler.
 
2013-04-18 03:40:13 PM  
Northeast US, caaaah=car  the hoppah=the hopper,  yoose=you
 
2013-04-18 03:41:21 PM  
To hell I say! I had a friend that would try extremely hard to sound cultured (He would study British dialect and such). To the point where I started pronouncing words oddly in our conversations just to get under his skin.

Examples:

Both  -> Bolth
Comfortable -> Cum Fort A Bull
Theater -> The Ate Err
 
2013-04-18 03:41:34 PM  
But really, the important linguistic question is Grinder? Sub? Hero? Dagwood?

/team Grinder
 
2013-04-18 03:42:27 PM  
Winder v. window

Warsh v. wash
 
2013-04-18 03:42:38 PM  

James_Dean_64: also AFF-lete


Not exactly a southern thing, more hip-hop urban slang.  "Th" sounds within a word (not the beginning) are replaced with "f"....such as "baffroom".

We had a trainer for APC do a session, and he was a caucasion New Yorker.  Every word he said with "th" in it was pronounced with the "f" sound....except words with the sound at the beginning, such as "that" or "this".   For those he used a "d" sound..."dis" or "dat".

That dude said stuff like "You put dis wiff dat, and you get da sum.  Let's take a baffroom break."
 
2013-04-18 03:42:58 PM  
Off-ten is staying. I'm seriously not changing it.

TheDumbBlonde: My friends that are local to Houston, Texas say "U-ston".


In NYC we pronounce it "House-ton". EXCEPT for the city. Which is Hue-ston. But you can always tell when someone is not from New York when they mispronounce the street.
 
2013-04-18 03:43:11 PM  

Slutter McGee: This is stupid. The way people speak is in no way a reflection of intelligence. If you think so then you are probably some idiot northern liberal. Dialect is something that is engrained in a person since child birth. Often this includes so called mispronunciation.

It isn't something thats easy to change.

Grammar in writing is something to judge people on. Judging somebody on different (incorrect or not) ways of pronunciation is just stupid. And I think most linguists would agree.

Slutter McGee


INgrained.

\retard
 
2013-04-18 03:43:13 PM  

Pants full of macaroni!!: Fun Fact:  The first syllable of the name Xavier is "ig".

Xavier is pronounced " zavier

"

Being a graduate of St F X   (S t  Francis Xavier University ) , four years of hearing this i know the pronunciation .
 
2013-04-18 03:44:47 PM  

cajunns: Pants full of macaroni!!: Fun Fact:  The first syllable of the name Xavier is "ig".

Xavier is pronounced " zavier"

Being a graduate of St F X   (S t  Francis Xavier University ) , four years of hearing this i know the pronunciation .


Sometimes also pronounced as "zah-vee-air"
 
2013-04-18 03:44:54 PM  
I suspect that the pronunciation of "often" is currently evolving, which means that some people are still pronouncing it as it is spelled (because it is spelled the way it was pronounced when the spelling was decided upon) and other people are slurring it, dropping the "t" as people so often do, because it is easier that way. The latter will soon be accusing the former of having it wrong instead of vice-versa, the way the British accuse Americans and Canadians of "pronouncing things the way they are spelled"

I DO NOT PRONOUNCE WORDS THE WAY THEY ARE SPELLED, ESPECIALLY WORDS THAT I DID NOT LEARN FROM A BOOK. I PRONOUNCE WORDS THE WAY DR. SAMUEL JOHNSON CHOSE TO SPELL THEM,  AND SO DID HE. Because that is the way they were pronounced by the British or at least many British at the time English immigrated to North America in the mouths of my ancestors and yours.

I would say both pronunciations are therefore correct for now.

The old pronunciation of Athlete has two syllables and is spelled exactly as it is pronounced. But rather than dropping a sound, people are perversely adding one. Why? Because they don't like having three consonants in a row -thl-, or rather, one diphthong and a consonant. They are adding an extra vowel to make the rule that each syllable must have a vowel and each vowel a syllable apply. Technically, they have turned one syllable into two the same way as we do with "rhythm" BECAUSE YOU CAN'T PRONOUNCE IT AS ONE.   The syllable is a marriage between one vowel and one consonant. Anything else is pre-verted.

Well, diphthong isn't easy either, but like athlete, you can pronounce it if you make a physical effort. But look how weird it looks spelled correctly.  Aren't you tempted to turn it into dip-thong? I know I am.

Of course, the same analysis is true of many shifts in pronunciation, including some that annoy some people very much and which they will irrationally fight tooth and claw until the day they die, even after a very large majority of people have made the transition.

This is normal. Linguists make a living studying these shifts and making "rules" that describe them. Whole new languages have been produced by such shifts, such as Modern Dutch from Old Low German, bits of English from Old German or Old Norse, and even Latin and Greek from some proto-language between them and Indo-European.

I sometimes use the "wrong" pronunciation of athelete myself but lean towards the two-syllable version of Athlete. But that is not pronunciation. It is etymology. The Greek word had two syllables, but there is no law that says the English can't perversely make it three or even one. They made a norange into an orange, so making athlete into a thlete would be par for the course.

I never say "excape" or "ex cetera" but am trying to break myself of "expresso" which I agree should remain espresso, the same as the correct Italian pronunciation. Why? Because Italian is cool and also because it is very precisely pronounced (at least by educated Italians), so that the spelling and the pronunciation almost always match. This is good. And rare. I appreciate it. Thanks, Italy!

If you say all three of these words with an ex- instead of an ess, you may be from Brooklyn rather than Alabama.  I ax yah. Which is worse? Definitely Alabama. Brooklynese is so cute. Too bad it seems to be dying out.

There is a tendency for pre- to become per-. Ax the Perfessor and I'll tell you to go ax a linguist. It is so.

Presumably it makes more sense (unconsciously) or it is simply easier. These shifts are often due to a false analogy which over time becomes true by virtue of dominating statistically. Lots of perfectly cromulent new or old words have become falsely attached to the wrong models of pronunciation or etymology or semantics because people thought the two words were related and thus should be the same. The easy and obvious explanation of a word's origin and meaning is often misleading and false. This is true of popular derivations and such pseudo-acronyms as "news".

NEWS is not an acronym for the points of the compass. It is derived from "new" not the cardinal directions. It was first used in print in The Merchant of Venice by William Shakespear. What news? might simply be a misprint for What's new? Or it might be the Englishing of Quelles nouvelles?, which which is French and plural where "new" was always singular in English until the time of Shakespeare. Shakspeer. Shakespear. Spell checker thinks that two of the known six spellings of Bill's name in his own hand are correct.

The author of this article (exceptionally) is only wrong or possibly wrong about two common errors of pronunciation. MINE. The rest of these errors do make you sound ignorant or at least from somewhere in the sticks, boondocks, back woods, back streets, or wherever people talk all wrong.

The mispronunciation of candidate makes you sound like a hick.

The mispronunciation of nuclear makes people want to nuke you, which is one of many reasons why liberals often hate or ridicule George Bush (my tenth cousin, insufficiently removed).

The mispronuncation of utmost seems like a feat of perversity, but it is probably just "mishearing". Obviously these people think the utmost is upper most. It isn't up. It is far, far away, further than anything else of its kind, like Utmost Thule, which may have been that part of Ireland or Britain called "Greenland" by the Viking, Eric the Real Estate Dealer. It is the Utmost North Western point in the Roman world. Or not. Utmost Thule might also be Scandinavia. A number of similar errors fail to come to mind, so I won't state them.

True, Greenland and Ireland are upper most on the map, but that, as some World Southerners and their allies will argue, is because Europeans hold their maps upside down.

I don't see how this is possible, seeing as the Europeans call the East East and the West West the same as Chinese and Japanese do. If they were holding the map upside down, East would be West and West would be East, and never the twain would meet. Wait. What? I have over-reached myself I think. Time to stop was about 500 words ago.

Thank God I gave this post a thorough proof-reading rather than doing that after I post it, because frankly, it is a loo-loo which was stuffed with many inexplicable errors that suggest Malapropism or verbal dyslexia.
 
2013-04-18 03:45:08 PM  

cbathrob: Then there's my Canadian friend who insists on pronouncing "pasta" like "Shasta."   Of course, I cut him slack precisely because he's from Canada.


They do a lot of words with the "ah" sound like that.  Last time I went to Canada I was amused to learn that they pronounce Nissan "nee-san", rhyming the second syllable with "pan".  A little jarring to hear it in radio ads for car dealerships.
 
2013-04-18 03:45:46 PM  
To those who don't read or can't abide long posts, Brantgoose says "Boo!"
 
2013-04-18 03:46:40 PM  

People_are_Idiots: one from the north I know commonly mispronounced: Massachusetts

Way everyone else pronounces: Mass-a-chew-sits

A native with an obvious speech impediment, or who just wanted to fark with you from there: Mass-a-too-sets


FTFY.

/nobody here pronounces it "Mass-a-too-sets"
//Masshole
 
2013-04-18 03:47:25 PM  
Lie-berry makes me want to strangle a moron. It's library, damn!
 
2013-04-18 03:47:45 PM  

Pants full of macaroni!!: cbathrob: Then there's my Canadian friend who insists on pronouncing "pasta" like "Shasta."   Of course, I cut him slack precisely because he's from Canada.

They do a lot of words with the "ah" sound like that.  Last time I went to Canada I was amused to learn that they pronounce Nissan "nee-san", rhyming the second syllable with "pan".  A little jarring to hear it in radio ads for car dealerships.


Hyundee Hyundai Hyunday?
 
2013-04-18 03:47:49 PM  

namegoeshere: Mr Guy: ph0rk: Mr Guy: FLMountainMan: My wife doesn't have much of an accent, but she does say:

holler - hollow

That's a new one on me.  Around here, "holler" is how you get someone's attention if they ignore you the first time.

It is an Appalachian-ism, and it is correspondingly ancient (well, in US terms)

Seems like it needs to be used with the southern pronoun, "them/that-thar".

As in, "Gimme one of themthar holler jugs for mah whis-skay".

A holler (spelled hollow) is a small valley in the mountains. You live in Beaver Holler.


Oh wow.  THAT use.  I guess I am southern, it didn't even occur to me to use it that way, because I don't even consider that incorrect usage.  I'd have probably had to think about it before I told you the correct name WAS Hollow, as in Sleepy Hollow, and not holler.

//Has a love deeper than the holler, stronger than the river
 
2013-04-18 03:49:58 PM  

Strik3r: NUCLEAR
Incorrect pronunciation: nuke - you - lerr

Correct pronunciation: new - clee - err

I'm going to try to get through this one without a President Bush joke.


Actually, Jimmy Carter said it that way, too, a fact that many Democrats conveniently forget.  Jimmy Carter has even less of an excuse, since he served on a nuclear sub.  He was roundly mocked by *Republican* elites for it, back in the day.

Pronouncing "ask" as "axe" is something I usually associate with African-American Vernacular English, but AAVE as spoken across the U.S. is heavily influenced by Southern American English, and I'm a damnyankee who doesn't often get to experience the speech of less-educated Southern whites.
 
2013-04-18 03:51:39 PM  
I never say "irregardless".

I prefer "irregardlessly" or "irregardlesslier" because it has more of the desired impact on the victim.  If I see a throbbing vein in the temple, I know I've succeeded.

In writing, there are even more options.  For example, I can start a sentence like this:

  "Irregardlessly, that beg's the question..."

Wonderful, concentrated, verbal evil.
 
2013-04-18 03:51:52 PM  
I'm going to take it for granite that many of you mispronounce the second month of the year. It's Feb-er-ary. Get it right or you'll look like a maroon.

Feb-er-ary.