Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(io9)   15 writers and directors who've spawned their own separate genres. Bonus: Not a slideshow   (io9.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Being John Malkovich, executive directors, Pan's Labyrinth, dark humor, BBC Television, Roger Corman, Studio Ghibli, Eternal Sunshine  
•       •       •

8996 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 18 Apr 2012 at 3:05 PM (9 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



95 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2012-04-18 3:12:43 PM  
The title's a little misleading, since I don't think most of these people really started their own genres, but they did at least create new niches in existing ones.

List is pretty incomplete without Tolkein (even though he didn't really originate his genre either) but I'm really glad to see the inclusion of Lem. He's one of the most overlooked "classic" authors. Probably because Solaris has been used by toilet paper by so many directors.
 
2012-04-18 3:13:42 PM  
This will lot end well
 
2012-04-18 3:14:40 PM  

Gunny Highway: This will lot not end well


*sigh*
 
2012-04-18 3:18:50 PM  
No Sam Raimi?

Evil Dead series = gore horror comedy
 
2012-04-18 3:22:48 PM  
i1214.photobucket.com
 
2012-04-18 3:23:24 PM  
OK- I'll bite...

WTF is with the Phillip K DIck pic?
 
2012-04-18 3:24:45 PM  
No Stephen King? True, he doesn't have a perfect track record, but still...
 
2012-04-18 3:26:05 PM  

Erix: The title's a little misleading, since I don't think most of these people really started their own genres, but they did at least create new niches in existing ones.

List is pretty incomplete without Tolkein (even though he didn't really originate his genre either) but I'm really glad to see the inclusion of Lem. He's one of the most overlooked "classic" authors. Probably because Solaris has been used by toilet paper by so many directors.


This. I'll agree some of them really made genre defining works, but the list is about as complete as a "top X albums of the X" list, it's just troll bait.

Speaking of, casting my ballot for a missing genre defining writer.
alangullette.comView Full Size



Pre Lovecraft, there was a lot of shock horror, jumping out and scaring you with the bogey man kind of stuff. He started the ideals of creeping terror. The things we fear the most are on the edge of our perception, fleeing just at the edge of what we "know" is the universe. Death is not swift, death is not fair or peaceful. Death follows you. Death is always there. Death is waiting for you.

Plus the guy is basically the god father of the modern zombie story. I could go on, but i feel the madness creeping in.
 
2012-04-18 3:30:34 PM  
No William Gibson?

So much fail...
So very much fail...
 
2012-04-18 3:37:32 PM  

KirkasinCaptainKirk: OK- I'll bite...

WTF is with the Phillip K DIck pic?


Was wondering that myself. Not just the head/face but a third hand is coming out of his sleeve or something.
 
2012-04-18 3:37:43 PM  
If this list were three times as long, it would still be woefully incomplete.......
 
2012-04-18 3:38:57 PM  

Expolaris: Speaking of, casting my ballot for a missing genre defining writer.


Came here to mention this. The people on this list became a genre onto themselves but Lovecraft actually created a genre that others took up and carried on with after he died (August Derleth, Robert Bloch et al.). People are still writing Cthulu stories to this day.
 
2012-04-18 3:41:16 PM  
David Lynch was the first to come to mind. I've seen most of his movies and just started watching Twin Peaks on Netflix recently.

"Weird, but cool" doesn't even begin to describe him.
 
2012-04-18 3:41:19 PM  

Lord Darth Porkins: No William Gibson?

So much fail...
So very much fail...


And no Harlan Ellison.
 
2012-04-18 3:41:41 PM  
Expolaris:

I disagree that H.P. Lovecraft defined his own genre. The genre, the Cthulhu Mythos, was defined by August Derleth, and is kind of anti-thetical to the concepts that Lovecraft explored in his fiction.
 
2012-04-18 3:44:02 PM  
No Neil Gaiman? Incomplete list is incomplete.
 
2012-04-18 3:44:26 PM  

Lord Darth Porkins: No William Gibson?

So much fail...
So very much fail...


That was the name that came to my mind when I saw the headline....
 
2012-04-18 3:44:49 PM  

sickb0y: KirkasinCaptainKirk: OK- I'll bite...

WTF is with the Phillip K DIck pic?

Was wondering that myself. Not just the head/face but a third hand is coming out of his sleeve or something.


There was an "android" Dick (heh) built to promote the release of the A Scanner Darkly movie.
 
2012-04-18 3:45:58 PM  

Nurglitch: Expolaris:

I disagree that H.P. Lovecraft defined his own genre. The genre, the Cthulhu Mythos, was defined by August Derleth, and is kind of anti-thetical to the concepts that Lovecraft explored in his fiction.


I watched an ultra low budget cheesefest of a movie called The Last Lovecraft on Netflix streaming. I thoroughly recommend it.
 
2012-04-18 3:47:28 PM  
No Uwe Boll?
 
2012-04-18 3:51:19 PM  

Nurglitch: Expolaris:

I disagree that H.P. Lovecraft defined his own genre. The genre, the Cthulhu Mythos, was defined by August Derleth, and is kind of anti-thetical to the concepts that Lovecraft explored in his fiction.


I think they both had their hand in evolving horror from knee jerk screamer reactions. Lovecraft had a lot of raw writing talent, he was very much so a tormented artist that needed August to help translate that to the readers. Of course he has his mark on the Mythos, i give most credit to Lovecraft for being the brain child here.

Good to know someone else knows the full story. Also, August was one dapper ass motherfarker back in the day.

upload.wikimedia.orgView Full Size
 
2012-04-18 3:58:20 PM  

Expolaris: Pre Lovecraft, there was a lot of shock horror, jumping out and scaring you with the bogey man kind of stuff. He started the ideals of creeping terror. The things we fear the most are on the edge of our perception, fleeing just at the edge of what we "know" is the universe. Death is not swift, death is not fair or peaceful. Death follows you. Death is always there. Death is waiting for you.

Plus the guy is basically the god father of the modern zombie story. I could go on, but i feel the madness creeping in.


Nonsense. Try reading Robert Chambers's The King In Yellow collection; he was already creeping readers out when Lovecraft was watching his own father die of syphilis; it wasn't until Lovecraft read The King in Yellow that HPL began writing real horror of his own. Meanwhile, Chambers's KiY stories stand up to this day as chillingly creepifying terror. Lovecraft stole the practice of only alluding to horrific events (instead of outright describing them) from Chambers, and used it well.

China Mieville is on his way to separating his subgenre from the greater genre in which he writes, but he still has a ways to go.
 
2012-04-18 4:01:41 PM  
The written portion for Whedon is one of the oddest backhanded compliments I've read.

Also, no Tim Powers? Fail. Between him and a few other authors of the time they would create the gaslight romance genre that would become nothing more than an aesthetic fad for teens later.
 
2012-04-18 4:04:06 PM  

sickb0y: KirkasinCaptainKirk: OK- I'll bite...

WTF is with the Phillip K DIck pic?

Was wondering that myself. Not just the head/face but a third hand is coming out of his sleeve or something.


That's an Animatronic Dick. I kid you not.
 
2012-04-18 4:11:43 PM  
Lovecraft. Tolkein. Gibson.

I may not personally enjoy most of the literature written by those three authors, but credit where credit's due.
 
2012-04-18 4:13:13 PM  

Wayne 985: David Lynch was the first to come to mind. I've seen most of his movies and just started watching Twin Peaks on Netflix recently.

"Weird, but cool" doesn't even begin to describe him.


Absolutely. No Lynch = glaring omission. Eraserhead, Blue Velvet, Twin Peaks, Lost Highway, Mulholland Drive - all very Lynchian. Or maybe Lynchesque?
 
2012-04-18 4:18:04 PM  
Joss Whedon? Seriously?
 
2012-04-18 4:19:26 PM  
So it goes.
 
2012-04-18 4:27:08 PM  

Erix: The title's a little misleading, since I don't think most of these people really started their own genres, but they did at least create new niches in existing ones.

List is pretty incomplete without Tolkein (even though he didn't really originate his genre either) but I'm really glad to see the inclusion of Lem. He's one of the most overlooked "classic" authors. Probably because Solaris has been used by toilet paper by so many directors.


Seth Grahame-Smith should probably be on this list for starting the round of stuffy-classic to horror send ups.
 
2012-04-18 4:31:39 PM  
Only Corman belongs on there.

Having a style does not mean you invented a genre. Whedon is all over the map - not a lot in common between Toy Story, Titan AE, Atlantis, Buffy, Angel, Firefly, Dollhouse, Avengers and Cabin in the Woods.
 
2012-04-18 4:37:46 PM  
Real inventors of a genre:

Edgar Allen Poe invented detective fiction
William Gibson was the primary effort behind cyberpunk
 
2012-04-18 4:38:13 PM  
List fails without William Gibson. List fails with Josh Whedon.
 
2012-04-18 4:40:19 PM  
The idea of creeping dread does certainly predate Lovecraft. Horror stories of the 19th century tended to rely very heavily on atmospherics; jump scares are actually rather modern (or ancient). Where Lovecraft differed was in casting humanity as utterly insignificant. It is in this that the real horror of his stories lie.

Ghosts imply that humanity's important by showing that there is something after death. It can also fit in with existing Judeo-Christian views. In Lovecraft's cosmicism, humanity simply did not matter. His worldview was mechanist-materialist, humans mere vessels of organic matter no more important than ants in the greater scheme of things. Lovecraft's style is completely devoid of spirituality. Even magic is actually advanced science or math, predating Clarke's Third Law (witness the eponymous witch of Dreams in the Witch House escaping her cell by drawing ideograms in her own blood; her captors thought it sorcery, but she knew it to be a kind of very sophisticated geometry).

While placing importance on concepts like science and math might seem to put humanity center stage, Lovecraft stressed that at a certain point it became impossible for humans to really comprehend. Some could get the basics, but would inevitably go mad from the result, and their understanding would fall far short of a Yithian's or an Elder Thing's. When it came to the true nature of the universe and humanity's ability to know it, one may as well attempt to explain Hamlet to a squirrel.

Some of Lovecraft's predecessors (like the tragically overlooked Chambers, who was arguably a somewhat better writer) touched on this, but none really explicated the true insignificance of humanity. Thus, for all his very real writing flaws, HPL is one of the most ferociously original minds in literary history.

Also: wow, I didn't know that's how Derleth looked. Now I want to see a webcomic called "The Adventures of Dapper Derleth," where Lovecraft would be the awkward dork that Derleth drags to parties.
 
2012-04-18 4:40:39 PM  

madgonad: Only Corman belongs on there.

Having a style does not mean you invented a genre. Whedon is all over the map - not a lot in common between Toy Story, Titan AE, Atlantis, Buffy, Angel, Firefly, Dollhouse, Avengers and Cabin in the Woods.


Then you haven't been paying attention.

His dialogue is distinctive -- I watched what Stark sez in the Avengers trailer and said, "Yup, that's Wheadon."
 
2012-04-18 4:42:02 PM  

russlar: No Uwe Boll?


No Elron?
 
2012-04-18 4:42:16 PM  
No Gene Roddenberry? Was there really "space opera" before Star Trek?
 
2012-04-18 4:42:24 PM  

She comes in colors everywhere: madgonad: Only Corman belongs on there.

Having a style does not mean you invented a genre. Whedon is all over the map - not a lot in common between Toy Story, Titan AE, Atlantis, Buffy, Angel, Firefly, Dollhouse, Avengers and Cabin in the Woods.

Then you haven't been paying attention.

His dialogue is distinctive -- I watched what Stark sez in the Avengers trailer and said, "Yup, that's Wheadon."


A style of writing is NOT a genre!
 
2012-04-18 4:44:13 PM  

Nem Wan: No Gene Roddenberry? Was there really "space opera" before Star Trek?


Yes, it just didn't reach into pop culture yet.
 
2012-04-18 4:46:11 PM  

madgonad: William Gibson was the primary effort behind cyberpunk


Not necessarily. Even if you discount Pynchon (Gibson has acknowledged him as one of his primary influences), you still have to acknowledge John M. Ford's 1980 novel Web of Angels which laid out many of the concepts that would come to comprise the cyberpunk genre, 4 years before Neuromancer was published. Strangely his name rarely comes up when discussing the genre.
 
2012-04-18 4:49:01 PM  

Snapper Carr: madgonad: William Gibson was the primary effort behind cyberpunk

Not necessarily. Even if you discount Pynchon (Gibson has acknowledged him as one of his primary influences), you still have to acknowledge John M. Ford's 1980 novel Web of Angels which laid out many of the concepts that would come to comprise the cyberpunk genre, 4 years before Neuromancer was published. Strangely his name rarely comes up when discussing the genre.


You could also make a good case for Alfred Bester's "The Stars My Destination," as the first cyberpunk novel. Despite being written in the '50s, I think it's aged better than Neuromancer.
 
2012-04-18 4:53:41 PM  
Control-F "Farmer"
No results.
What the fark.

paperbackfantasies.jjelmquist.comView Full Size


If you put Heinlein, you must put Philip Jose Farmer, particularly if you're talking sex in science fiction(like they do). Heinlein says as much in his Stranger dedication.
 
2012-04-18 4:55:52 PM  
sabotagetimes.comView Full Size
 
2012-04-18 4:55:59 PM  
Also, Glen Cook for what The Black Company created and how it has influenced fantasy since(particularly Erikson).
 
2012-04-18 4:57:24 PM  
images.wikia.comView Full Size
 
2012-04-18 4:57:51 PM  
Control + F "Warren Ellis" Phrase not found

Fark your list and that is all
 
2012-04-18 5:05:43 PM  

Nem Wan: No Gene Roddenberry? Was there really "space opera" before Star Trek?


In Japan

encrypted-tbn2.google.comView Full Size
 
2012-04-18 5:05:44 PM  

Optimal_Illusion: sickb0y: KirkasinCaptainKirk: OK- I'll bite...

WTF is with the Phillip K DIck pic?

Was wondering that myself. Not just the head/face but a third hand is coming out of his sleeve or something.

That's an Animatronic Dick. I kid you not.


It's always an Animatronic Dick, never your Animatronic Dick.
 
2012-04-18 5:06:53 PM  
No Paul of Tarsus? The creator of the first zombie fiction? Sure it was made more famous by Romero and others, but the guy should get some credit.
 
2012-04-18 5:27:58 PM  

BigLuca: No Paul of Tarsus? The creator of the first zombie fiction? Sure it was made more famous by Romero and others, but the guy should get some credit.


The resurrection of Lazarus was in the Gospel according to John; the unrelated story of Lazarus and the rich man was in Luke. Saul of Tarsus was a hijacking hack with no direct knowledge of the lord he claimed to serve, and I've never been convinced that his agenda of destroying the neo-Judaic followers of Jesus ever ended. Don't let's give him any more credit than is strictly necessary.

Unless I'm missing something.
 
2012-04-18 5:28:14 PM  
Okay, most of this list is uncontroversial. However, subtract these two:
- Heinlein was working within an existing genre which was well-established, even though he's popular. The golden age of sci fi was not just Heinlein, so this is a bullsh*t pick.
- Frank Miller only seems interesting if you don't know what he's ripping off. Oh, he brought noir to comics? So did Alan Moore, except he did it better.

I'll defend these two:
- Anne Rice... I want to say she doesn't belong on this list but she singlehandedly created the gayish American vampires in New Orleans genre, and she's influenced a lot of other works. Would Poppy Z. Brite or True Blood exist without Anne Rice? Nope!
- Joss Whedon: i09's list explained his influence badly. Joss Whedon's genre isn't just the quippy nerd shiat. That's the outer wrapper of the Joss Whedon genre, which should probably be called something more along the lines of "consciously feminist team-of-misfits action". Beyond Joss Whedon's own work, I think you can probably think of more than a few examples of "consciously feminist team-of-misfits action" shows created since the late 90s; they usually star blonde or surprisingly slight heroines and are/were constantly under threat of cancellation.
 
Displayed 50 of 95 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking





On Twitter



  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.