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(Telegraph)   After three years of intense scrutiny, the EU claims that water can not, in fact, prevent dehydration   (telegraph.co.uk) divider line
    More: Stupid, bottled waters  
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7189 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Nov 2011 at 6:04 PM (8 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2011-11-18 3:49:39 PM  
photos.imageevent.comView Full Size
 
2011-11-18 4:07:34 PM  
And linking your economy to Greece and Italy was a great idea.
 
2011-11-18 4:37:52 PM  
Aah, the Telegraph, always willing to misunderstand, misrepresent, and generally make shiat up when it comes to anything European.

What they actually said
 
2011-11-18 5:31:15 PM  
Politicians going against the opinion of scientific experts? How very American of them!
 
2011-11-18 6:07:21 PM  
H-duh-O.
 
2011-11-18 6:10:21 PM  
Brawndo - The Thirst Mutilator!
 
2011-11-18 6:10:40 PM  
Lewis Black said it best (NSFW language)
 
2011-11-18 6:14:57 PM  
You mean from toilets?
 
2011-11-18 6:14:58 PM  
Nope, they're right. It's beer. That'll do it!
 
2011-11-18 6:16:15 PM  
Well, ours labels a pack of peanuts, "May contain nuts."

GOVERNMENT!
 
2011-11-18 6:19:08 PM  
why should I eat? I'd just get hungry again tomorrow.
 
2011-11-18 6:21:27 PM  
Whar Ric Romero, Wharrrr!!!!
 
2011-11-18 6:22:03 PM  
Water will kill ya 'almost' every time.

/Scuze me whilst I go and drink that special bottled water with lithium in it, to cure civilization(depression).
//Tap water will kill you. Yea Really. Especially New Orleans tap water. Cancer from all the Mississippi crap, does a body bad.
 
2011-11-18 6:23:29 PM  
It's what plants crave!
 
2011-11-18 6:24:54 PM  
It's another misrepresentation. The EU once decided that genetic mutation in some banana plants should be prevented from entering the grocery supply chain. These mutations often show themselves as overly twisty or corkscrew shaped fruit. The Newspapers* decided that Brussels was banning all bananas that weren't straight as a ruler. It also seems Americans love this kind of thing because they're used to opinion based news with little regard to factuality.

*The paper bit is acknowledged. The news bit, not so much.
 
2011-11-18 6:28:53 PM  

DammitIForgotMyLogin: Aah, the Telegraph, always willing to misunderstand, misrepresent, and generally make shiat up when it comes to anything European.

What they actually said


"Firstly, "regular consumption" of water doesn't reduce the risk of dehydration any more than eating a pork pie a day reduces the risk of starvation. If I drink half a pint of bottled water while running through a desert in the blistering sun, I'll still end up dehydrated, and if I drink several bottles today, that won't prevent me from dehydrating tomorrow. "

Ah yes now it seems perfectly reasonable to conclude that water does not reduce the risk of dehydration.
Are you farking kidding me?! Wouldn't you increase the time it takes to become dehydrated by either of those examples? Thus if your strenuous European desert jog, or water chugging contest only lasted for a short period of time, those actions would amazingly prevent you from being dehydrated.

\Scientists is so many smarter than me
 
2011-11-18 6:30:47 PM  
Water? Water!

2pep.comView Full Size
 
2011-11-18 6:31:53 PM  

GORDON: Well, ours labels a pack of peanuts, "May contain nuts."

GOVERNMENT!


Peanuts are not nuts.
 
2011-11-18 6:35:51 PM  

Shazam999: What they actually said was still pretty stupid.


If that Guardian bit is accurate, yes, it's still pretty stupid.

Firstly, "regular consumption" of water doesn't reduce the risk of dehydration any more than eating a pork pie a day reduces the risk of starvation. If I drink half a pint of bottled water while running through a desert in the blistering sun, I'll still end up dehydrated, and if I drink several bottles today, that won't prevent me from dehydrating tomorrow. The key is to drink enough water when you need it, and you're not going to get that from any bottled water product unless it's mounted on a drip.

Secondly, dehydration doesn't just mean a lack of water, or 'being thirsty'; electrolytes like sodium are important too. If salt levels fall too far, the body struggles to regulate fluid levels in the first place. That's why hospitals use saline drips to prevent dehydration in patients who can't take fluids orally, and why people with diarhhoea are treated with salt-containing oral rehydration fluids.


Unless I'm misunderstanding, the first point is analogous to arguing that you can't say vitamin C prevents scurvy, because it won't work if you don't get enough of it or only get it all at once then never again. The same is true of any proven prescription medication. Intuitively, the whole argument seems absurd on it's face: yes, eating a pork pie a day will almost certainly prevent starvation.

The second point, that it's not the only factor, is not very persuasive, either. Sugar intake isn't the only factor in diabetes. Are we not going to say that cutting your sugar intake can prevent diabetes?

It sounds less like the Telegraph is desperate to mock the EU and more like the Guardian is desperate to defend it on this one.
 
2011-11-18 6:36:43 PM  

DammitIForgotMyLogin: Aah, the Telegraph, always willing to misunderstand, misrepresent, and generally make shiat up when it comes to anything European.

What they actually said



Nope, still farking stupid.
 
2011-11-18 6:38:45 PM  

Dextro: GORDON: Well, ours labels a pack of peanuts, "May contain nuts."

GOVERNMENT!

Peanuts are not nuts.


They're just delightfully eccentric.

/yeah yeah, legumes
 
2011-11-18 6:38:47 PM  

mdking09: DammitIForgotMyLogin: Aah, the Telegraph, always willing to misunderstand, misrepresent, and generally make shiat up when it comes to anything European.

What they actually said

"Firstly, "regular consumption" of water doesn't reduce the risk of dehydration any more than eating a pork pie a day reduces the risk of starvation. If I drink half a pint of bottled water while running through a desert in the blistering sun, I'll still end up dehydrated, and if I drink several bottles today, that won't prevent me from dehydrating tomorrow. "

Ah yes now it seems perfectly reasonable to conclude that water does not reduce the risk of dehydration.
Are you farking kidding me?! Wouldn't you increase the time it takes to become dehydrated by either of those examples? Thus if your strenuous European desert jog, or water chugging contest only lasted for a short period of time, those actions would amazingly prevent you from being dehydrated.

\Scientists is so many smarter than me


The distinction appears to be between someone who drinks water, and someone who stays equally hydrated with other beverages prior to said run. Water doesn't confer some magical anti-dehydration power beyond any other beverage that has an equivalent amount of H2O in it.

That said, it does seem like it's pretty harmless to allow companies to advertise it that way, since obviously few people interpret the claim in the way that I stated above.
 
2011-11-18 6:38:56 PM  
This doesn't really "make " them look stupid. It confirms it.

"Water water everywhere, and not a drop to drink"
 
2011-11-18 6:40:07 PM  
Did someone say water?

thewambank.comView Full Size
 
2011-11-18 6:40:08 PM  

Dextro: GORDON: Well, ours labels a pack of peanuts, "May contain nuts."

GOVERNMENT!

Peanuts are not nuts.


Right. They're legumes. So someone with a tree nut allergy who isn't affected by peanuts might still want the heads up.

What gets me are the warnings on products that have the offending item in their name. I don't need to know Peanut M&M's contain peanuts.
 
2011-11-18 6:40:20 PM  
1.bp.blogspot.comView Full Size


Water don't solve no LA EU drought, boy!
 
2011-11-18 6:40:40 PM  

mdking09: Ah yes now it seems perfectly reasonable to conclude that water does not reduce the risk of dehydration.
Are you farking kidding me?! Wouldn't you increase the time it takes to become dehydrated by either of those examples? Thus if your strenuous European desert jog, or water chugging contest only lasted for a short period of time, those actions would amazingly prevent you from being dehydrated.

\Scientists is so many smarter than me


Their argument means it's useless to drink water if you're doing anything outside and sweating. Because if water doesn't help prevent dehydration then why bother? You may as well go jogging with a fifth of bourbon. But if you're willing to acknowledge that, yes, water prevents dehydration then you're going to see the wisdom in drinking water when you're doing something strenuous.

The problem is political activists in Europe HAAAAAAAATE water bottlers and want to counter their marketing at every turn. If they put "better than drinking straight mercury" on their bottles then we'd see the same pencil necks advocating a diet high in mercury out of spite.
 
2011-11-18 6:46:17 PM  

Arklop: [1.bp.blogspot.com image 460x276]

Water don't solve no LA EU drought, boy!


Nice.
 
2011-11-18 6:50:04 PM  

Mrbogey: Their argument means it's useless to drink water if you're doing anything outside and sweating. Because if water doesn't help prevent dehydration then why bother? You may as well go jogging with a fifth of bourbon. But if you're willing to acknowledge that, yes, water prevents dehydration then you're going to see the wisdom in drinking water when you're doing something strenuous.

The problem is political activists in Europe HAAAAAAAATE water bottlers and want to counter their marketing at every turn. If they put "better than drinking straight mercury" on their bottles then we'd see the same pencil necks advocating a diet high in mercury out of spite.


Sarcasm... how does it work?
 
2011-11-18 6:54:02 PM  

jagec: The distinction appears to be between someone who drinks water, and someone who stays equally hydrated with other beverages prior to said run. Water doesn't confer some magical anti-dehydration power beyond any other beverage that has an equivalent amount of H2O in it.


Patently not true, and there's nothing magical about it. Water can prevent dehydration better than the H2O equivalent of beer, milk, soft drinks, coffee, energy drinks, or virtually any other drink besides sports drinks, and even that is questionable.
 
2011-11-18 7:03:01 PM  
If the scientific consensus is that [ fill in blank ] is true, then the true idiots are those who disagree with the learned professors.
 
2011-11-18 7:03:32 PM  
Meh. They drink an idiotic amount of bottled water in western Europe. I'm accustomed to public drinking fountains and tap water routinely served in restaurants for free. It's not so there. Good luck finding either. There's nothing wrong with the tap water. They'd just much rather sell you obscenely overpriced bottle water.

Anyway, as for the ruling (from the Guardian article linked above):
They even have the support of the British Soft Drinks Association, who tweeted just as this piece was going live with the following statement:

The European Food Safety Authority has been asked to rule on several ways of wording the statement that drinking water is good for hydration and therefore good for health. It rejected some wordings on technicalities, but it has supported claims that drinking water is good for normal physical and cognitive functions and normal thermoregulation.
 
2011-11-18 7:05:36 PM  
Wow. At least the U.S. isn't winning the race to Idiocracy anymore.
 
2011-11-18 7:07:12 PM  
Don't get me started on Dihydrogen Monoxide.
 
Al!
2011-11-18 7:12:58 PM  
The ruling is imbecilic, for sure, but it does hold some weight. A very small amount, maybe a few femtograms, but some weight is more than no weight.

Water does not inexorably prevent dehydration. You can't tell someone with with one of a few certain rare diseases that cause dehydration that drinking water will help them if the problem is that their body is not absorbing the water. Equally, you can't say that drinking water will prevent dehydration without also saying how much water the body needs under normal conditions. A small sip a day may be enough liquid water for a person who gets hydration from other means, but if you get all of your hydration from liquid water and then cut back to a sip a day, you will get dehydrated and that small sip every day won't help you one bit.

The unfortunate thing is that it is "water" that prevents dehydration. The ruling is, I'm sure, linked solely to bottled water. If you want to stay hydrated, water is the only thing that will do it. You can get the water from eating juicy, dripping, delicious steaks all day, or you can get the water from a bottle or faucet. Your body needs water, though. It's part of metabolism. For each calorie you ingest, your body needs approximately 1 mL of water in order to break it down into the various bits your body needs (glucose etc). The very name "dehydration", in medical context, means your body does not have sufficient water to perform its normal tasks. While it would be rare, drinking water might not specifically remedy dehydration. A proper statement should read something like this: "Water, being necessary for all documented life on Earth, is a healthy and natural way to keep your body hydrated in all but the most severe and improbable cases."
 
2011-11-18 7:13:35 PM  

Kumana Wanalaia: Dextro: GORDON: Well, ours labels a pack of peanuts, "May contain nuts."

GOVERNMENT!

Peanuts are not nuts.

They're just delightfully eccentric.

/yeah yeah, legumes


Powdered donuts make me go nuts.
 
2011-11-18 7:17:38 PM  
...only DiHydration...
 
2011-11-18 7:23:28 PM  
 
2011-11-18 8:02:00 PM  
Did they use the same peer reviewed scientists that they use for the global warming argument? Muahahahahahahahahahahahaha.
 
2011-11-18 8:06:08 PM  

Shazam999: DammitIForgotMyLogin: Aah, the Telegraph, always willing to misunderstand, misrepresent, and generally make shiat up when it comes to anything European.

What they actually said

What they actually said was still pretty stupid.


This.

What they ACTUALLY said is just a lame justification for what they really said, which is that water does not prevent dehydration. Kind of a liquid variant on the "Guns don't kill people, tightly compacted lead projectiles propelled by an explosive gas reaction kill people".
 
2011-11-18 8:20:24 PM  

groppet: You mean from toilets?


Yeah, it has no electrolytes!
 
2011-11-18 8:27:21 PM  
You laugh now, but we'll see what happens when somebody tells these guys that drinking water can cause water intoxication.
 
2011-11-18 9:37:56 PM  
Al!
+1

Ridiculous article - One sweats and pees/poops water and electrolytes not dissimilar to their current composition. I am not aware of anyone these days with a shortage of sodium, potassium, magnesium etc due to our western -'pig out' diets. There are people that have taken walks in Death Valley in CA (130+ degrees) and died within 200 yards of their car from dehydration. Guess a liter of Dansani water (carcinogenic bromate infested) woulda helped.
 
2011-11-18 9:38:13 PM  
FTA: "Producers of bottled water are now forbidden by law from making the claim and will face a two-year jail sentence if they defy the edict, which comes into force in the UK next month. "

Yeah kids. Dare claim that water may help to prevent dehydration and you're looking at TWO YEARS hard labor on a diet of bread and, uh, bread* - because who needs water anyway?

*and jam every other day


/Listening to bureaucrat "scientists" may cause insanity
//If you follow their advice, YOU WILL SURELY DIE
//I guaran-farking-tee it
 
2011-11-18 9:47:49 PM  

Amos Quito: FTA: "Producers of bottled water are now forbidden by law from making the claim and will face a two-year jail sentence if they defy the edict, which comes into force in the UK next month. "

Yeah kids. Dare claim that water may help to prevent dehydration and you're looking at TWO YEARS hard labor on a diet of bread and, uh, bread* - because who needs water anyway?

*and jam every other day


/Listening to bureaucrat "scientists" may cause insanity
//If you follow their advice, YOU WILL SURELY DIE
//I guaran-farking-tee it


+1 cajun.

P.S. I-GAR-UN-TEE.
 
2011-11-18 10:23:36 PM  
Clearly this study is the catalyst required to launch a multinational $100 billion study in all the world's most prestigious Universities to determine if food can prevent hunger.

It may take years to prove or disprove such a controversial theory but it will at least keep many graduate students occupied while they achieve their doctorates.
 
2011-11-18 11:47:42 PM  
Prevents dehydration... No.

Keeps you hydrated (if you keep drinking it) yes.
 
2011-11-18 11:48:22 PM  

Country Member: Clearly this study is the catalyst required to launch a multinational $100 billion study in all the world's most prestigious Universities to determine if food can prevent hunger.

It may take years to prove or disprove such a controversial theory but it will at least keep many graduate students occupied while they achieve their doctorates.


I'm tempted to say that by their arguments, sufficient intake of nutrients via other sources would obviate the need for consumption of "food" per se. Assuming a proper balance of vitamins, minerals, proteins and carbohydrates could be maintained, there would be no need to supplement your body with other calories.
 
2011-11-19 12:03:03 AM  
This expert would beg to differ on the properties of water.

img.photobucket.comView Full Size
 
2011-11-19 12:09:47 AM  
thepeoplesvoice.orgView Full Size



Don't hydrate me, bro!
 
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