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(Yahoo)   NASA spacecraft now circling massive object that is not your wife, despite being super-hot on one side and super-cold on the other   (news.yahoo.com) divider line
    More: Cool, NASA, mercury, Applied Physics Laboratory, light pollution, spacecraft, NASA spacecraft, magnetic fields, orbits  
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3378 clicks; posted to Fandom » on 18 Mar 2011 at 10:17 AM (10 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



23 Comments     (+0 »)
 
2011-03-18 7:20:07 AM  
Mom?

j/k
 
2011-03-18 9:57:39 AM  

Alphax: Mom?

j/k


Yo momma so big she has her own cluster of geostationary satellites in orbit

/In my case, substitute ex-wife for momma :(
 
2011-03-18 10:17:31 AM  
My ex-wife had a super-hot side? Why didn't someone tell me about that before?
 
2011-03-18 10:22:01 AM  
Finally!

I was laid off in 2001 and got a temp job working on the structural panels of this spacecraft. Interesting and boring all at the same time. I'm glad it made it.
 
2011-03-18 10:22:20 AM  
Mercury. The Delaware of planets.

"Hi. We're studying......Mercury..."
 
2011-03-18 10:40:40 AM  
Awesomeness.

Here's to a long, successful mission, Messenger!
 
2011-03-18 10:43:12 AM  
I don't know if I would classify Mercury as a massive body.

My senior design class had a couple of space probe missions we could design that included either Mercury or Pluto. Both are at opposite ends of the spectrum in terms of extremes. My group chose Pluto, but it was interesting to talk to the Mercury group and discuss the technical issues they had to consider. They did have it lucky it that power was never a problem for them.

/There is no way that can be considered a csb.
 
2011-03-18 10:46:03 AM  

SacriliciousBeerSwiller: Mercury. The Delaware of planets.

"Hi. We're studying......Mercury..."


Actually Mercury is quite fascinating. You're probably thinking of Uranus.
 
2011-03-18 10:53:13 AM  
A McDLT? Now, if my ex-wife was one of those, I might want her back.
 
2011-03-18 10:56:32 AM  

SacriliciousBeerSwiller: Mercury. The Delaware of planets.


It's where a majority of Fortune 500 companies are chartered?
 
2011-03-18 10:56:51 AM  
Sigh. I wish society were such that this was a much bigger story.
 
2011-03-18 11:18:22 AM  
Astronomers believe my wife is hot on both sides. But I will have to "launch a rocket" tonight to "confirm" this.

For serious though, If there is water ice on Mercury, I will trip balls. I grew up on Golden Age sci-fi stories about how it was always hot enough there to melt the lead shielding off your robots.
 
2011-03-18 12:25:22 PM  
Imagine playing a game of "horse", only the basketball is a space probe, and the shot to beat is, 15 laps around the farking SUN and then nothing but net into orbital insertion.

Great work, APL orbital mechanics dudes.
 
2011-03-18 12:40:24 PM  
Congratulations. Well done. Keep up the good work.

/tweets to other spacecraft made me smile.
 
2011-03-18 12:44:59 PM  

Zap_Rowsdower: Sigh. I wish society were such that this was a much bigger story.


This. Instead the media is going ape shiat over nuclear reactors that might/could/maybe/sort of/possibly hurt some people while there are thousands that are actually dead from tsunamis/earthquake.

/why are we spending money on Nasa when we have problems here!!11!
//derp
 
2011-03-18 12:50:15 PM  
Why did it take six years to get there? As outer space trips go, it's not that far. We've sent missions to Mars that took less than a year and Mars is around 36 million miles away. Mercury is only 12 million miles further away, whiy did it take six times as long to get there?
 
2011-03-18 1:06:28 PM  
Because of the Sun's gravity. Think of racing straight down a steep mountainside and stopping on a dime.

Now think of running down a trail full of switchbacks and stopping on a dime. Much easier. The 'slope' of Messenger's path as it circled the Sun is actually fairly similar to the slope of most hiking trails in the Rockies.
 
2011-03-18 1:26:08 PM  

GypsyJoker: Awesomeness.

Here's to a long, successful mission, Messenger!


I kept wondering if Microsoft was sponsoring it to launch their new chat application...

/Brought to you by Carl's, Jr.
 
2011-03-18 1:48:55 PM  
-300 degrees?!? But that's below 0 degrees Kelvi.... ooooh, that American degrees. I wonder how fast the Messenger's top speed was on its way to Mercury? 400 furlongs/Tuesday?
 
2011-03-18 3:42:11 PM  

isaaczeke: -300 degrees?!? But that's below 0 degrees Kelvi.... ooooh, that American degrees. I wonder how fast the Messenger's top speed was on its way to Mercury? 400 furlongs/Tuesday?


This is how I'll be measuring speed from now on.
 
2011-03-18 4:50:55 PM  

musashi1600: SacriliciousBeerSwiller: Mercury. The Delaware of planets.

It's where a majority of Fortune 500 companies are chartered?


Also the home base of the industrial conglomerate that supplied Washington with whiskey, canon and gunpowder during the revolution. (the canon and whiskey just happened to come from affiliated units in VA and PA respectively)
 
2011-03-19 4:42:42 AM  

probably: isaaczeke: -300 degrees?!? But that's below 0 degrees Kelvi.... ooooh, that American degrees. I wonder how fast the Messenger's top speed was on its way to Mercury? 400 furlongs/Tuesday?

This is how I'll be measuring speed from now on.


The unit which represents this speed should be named the isaaczeke. As in, "he hurried along at a brisk pace of two isaaczekes so he could pick up a coffee on the way to class."
 
2011-03-19 7:50:27 PM  

clambam: Why did it take six years to get there? As outer space trips go, it's not that far. We've sent missions to Mars that took less than a year and Mars is around 36 million miles away. Mercury is only 12 million miles further away, whiy did it take six times as long to get there?


farking orbital dynamics...how do they work?

They needed to shed off lots of velocity to match the velocity of mercury (it's an inner planet that's only so massive) so they didn't need an ass ton of fuel to go into orbit. Planetary anti-slingshots were used to shed that velocity.
 
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