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(YouTube)   Engine failure. I think I'm gonna Yak   (youtube.com) divider line
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11839 clicks; posted to Video » on 13 Feb 2011 at 3:47 AM (10 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2011-02-13 2:25:05 AM  
"Post major maintenance/life extension at EGMJ a YAK 50 loses oil pressure over the Lake District at 1250ft."

Who pays for that?

Mechanic's insurance company? If so, how many oopsies does he get?

If you lose oil pressure, do you keep on flying and see how far you get, or get down now?

Also, does the pilot seem a little indecisive about picking the field? Shouldn't he use whatever altitude he has to find a close, good field, and stick to that, and set up the best pattern possible?

He was initially flying over hills/mountains and city (with possible streets) and beyond the hills were the fields. Seemed interesting to try and climb above the hills on that engine and proceed.

But what do I know, the planes I fly these days have rubber bands.
 
2011-02-13 2:42:19 AM  
If he'd been wearing some shiatty Timex from Wal-Mart, the plane would have augured in at Mach 3.

Expensive watches save lives here, folks! Go out any buy three, just to be safe!
 
2011-02-13 3:02:52 AM  
That's Russian technology at its finest right there, I tells ya!


/would have been funnier if "This plane crash brought to you by Popov Vodka!"
 
2011-02-13 4:31:52 AM  
Damn talk about nerves of steel. If that'd been me the recording would have been about 30 seconds of audio of me screaming like a girl and shiatting myself before I augured in.
 
2011-02-13 4:44:47 AM  

RoyBatty: "Post major maintenance/life extension at EGMJ a YAK 50 loses oil pressure over the Lake District at 1250ft."


If you lose oil pressure, do you keep on flying and see how far you get, or get down now?

[...]

He was initially flying over hills/mountains and city (with possible streets) and beyond the hills were the fields. Seemed interesting to try and climb above the hills on that engine and proceed.

But what do I know, the planes I fly these days have rubber bands.


In a situation like that, altitude = time. If you can get high enough, you can sometimes make it back to the runway. Or choose a better field in which to land.
 
2011-02-13 6:15:03 AM  
nice landing..i have done that many times, but i was on fire, and full of bullet holes.
 
2011-02-13 7:24:48 AM  

some_beer_drinker: nice landing..i have done that many times, but i was on fire, and full of bullet holes.


Was your plane on fire or have any bullet holes? If not then it doesn't really count.
 
2011-02-13 8:25:56 AM  
images.nymag.comView Full Size


I'll be in the Hudson
 
2011-02-13 8:39:13 AM  
@RoyBatty

I think he was trying to find the flattest area he could, so he was flying as long as the engine would hold out, cause if you look closely in the Vid, you can see some hills under him before he gets to the field he finally sets down at, and even then, it rips his undercarrage out on the relatively flat land. Also the golf course he was first thinking about setting down at wasn't wide or long enough I imagine
 
2011-02-13 8:47:11 AM  

gmupps: In a situation like that, altitude = time. If you can get high enough, you can sometimes make it back to the runway. Or choose a better field in which to land.


I'm not qualified to second guess the pilot, but while altitude = time, I'm not sure attempting to prolong the flight to get over hills and mountains when there are perhaps reasonable alternatives below you is the best choice.

And presumably, if when he was flying there were no reasonable alternatives below him given his altitude, then he was perhaps too low to begin with.

Especially after the call that he had oil beginning to stream down the cockpit. I'd hate to land any aircraft with oil on the windscreen.

But hey, here is another forum talking about this landing:

http://www.pprune.org/private-flying/430217-engine-problems-forced-lan​ding-vide o .html
 
2011-02-13 8:52:04 AM  

markie_farkie: If he'd been wearing some shiatty Timex from Wal-Mart, the plane would have augured in at Mach 3.

Expensive watches save lives here, folks! Go out any buy three, just to be safe!


Better yet, install one of these:

bgu.ac.ilView Full Size
 
2011-02-13 8:59:52 AM  
Here he's talks about his landing a bit: http://www.pistonheads.com/gassing/topic.asp?h=0&f=191&t=913746&mid=0 He's YAK50FLY.

"Its wet & boggy and short fields aplenty and I'm from the area so elected to head west. Its certainly not flat.
Large field unfortunately had big holes in it recently made by a JCB. The final field was upslope, left to fallow so better drained.
It was impossible to walk on the big field due to the mud sticking to everything so in hindsight very lucky it was the smaller final field... stone wall was 1.5ft high, fence posts a little higher."

Apparently too, it was a wheel's up landing which is the recommended way to land that and some other taildraggers that could flip over and crush your head. (But I thought it had taken out his gear too.)
 
2011-02-13 9:02:11 AM  
http://www.aaib.gov.uk/cms_resources.cfm?file=/YAK-50,%20G-YAKK%2008-1​0.pdf

On examining the engine, the pilot identified that the
oil pressure adjustment valve was missing from the oil
scavenge pump housing (Figure 1). It was found in the
lower cowling with no evidence of the expected wire
locking. He believed that the valve had worked loose
and fallen out during the accident flight, causing the
oil loss. The aircraft had recently undergone extensive
maintenance which included an overhaul of the oil
scavenge pump assembly. Initial flights following this
work revealed a small oil leak in the area of the pump,
which at the time, was thought to be have been remedied
by an engineer tightening the small vertical bolts adjacent
to the pressure adjustment valve.
 
2011-02-13 10:44:39 AM  
They say you don't want to use engine power unless absolutely necessary. I guess you have to credit the pilot for not risking his life to save the engine. Use the power you have to increase your chances for a safe landing. Those initial areas looked pretty foreboding.
 
2011-02-13 11:44:14 AM  
I;m all down with the height = safety but farking allah! There were roads he could have landed on.

What's up with that?
 
2011-02-13 11:48:57 AM  
I didn't think he was going to get wings level after that last turn. Yeesh.
 
2011-02-13 11:50:33 AM  

chopit: I didn't think he was going to get wings level after that last turn. Yeesh.


I was waiting for the stall.
 
2011-02-13 11:54:13 AM  
I don't get it. That is the lamest "viral" video for a watch company ever.
 
2011-02-13 12:36:06 PM  
I was going to snark about the lack of battery backup for his radio (no transmission after engine cut) until he got out and turned around. I think i've pedaled heavier contraptions than that... Probably didn't have the lifting capacity to fit a battery.
 
2011-02-13 12:47:12 PM  
As a pilot myself with 2 engine failures under my belt I have to say this pilot handled himself with aplomb. A decent landing in a field is one you can walk away from.
 
2011-02-13 12:58:45 PM  

douchebag/hater: There were roads he could have landed on.

What's up with that?


Roads are tricky - not always straight, very hard, not level, very narrow, hedgerows or ditches immediately adjacent, often accompanied by power or voice cabling, bridges, pedestrian and, quite often, traffic - which makes for a very hard landing.
 
2011-02-13 1:18:07 PM  

Bolo Jungle: douchebag/hater: There were roads he could have landed on.

What's up with that?

Roads are tricky - not always straight, very hard, not level, very narrow, hedgerows or ditches immediately adjacent, often accompanied by power or voice cabling, bridges, pedestrian and, quite often, traffic - which makes for a very hard landing.


I think it's a real difficult choice.

In the US, it seems pretty common to hear of aircraft landing on a freeway, and I've passed by at least two after they had landed. Freeways are pretty wide, but there are cars! and overpasses and streetlights and Jersey Barriers -- yuck.

But he would have gotten to land wheels down. A google map of the area (in the post I linked to) shows what seem to be possible decent landing roads pretty close by.

But fields seem dicey too. The pilot of this aircraft writes to say the field he was aiming for, he's glad he flew over it, because it was so muddy he couldn't walk through it, and full of some pretty big holes (maybe it had just been plowed?) But they are so wide and pretty and if he's landing wheels up and the field is mostly grass and dirt it may not cause that much damage.

I landed a glider short of the runway about 20 years ago, and ditched into a field of wheat because I didn't think I could make it over the powerlines. Because of the wheat, because of the glider's skid, there was no damage at all, except for my ego, and the hour it took me to get the wheat out of every nook and cranny in the wing and fuselage. But of course, that was a craft meant to land off a runway.

I'm not sure what to make of this video -- I am curious who pays for the damage to the aircraft.
 
2011-02-13 1:39:42 PM  
'Thanks' to Bolo Jungle and RoyBatty.

I think planes are cooler than shiat - even worked at EAA back in the day - but could never be a pilot.
 
2011-02-13 2:39:35 PM  
I'm not a pilot, but I have all kinds of opinions about how he did it wrong.
 
2011-02-13 2:44:48 PM  

Old enough to know better: Damn talk about nerves of steel. If that'd been me the recording would have been about 30 seconds of audio of me screaming like a girl and shiatting myself before I augured in.


That's kinda what I was thinking. I dont know that I would have remained that calm, I get the impression he's good at what he does.
 
2011-02-13 3:48:55 PM  

Unixfreak: That's kinda what I was thinking. I dont know that I would have remained that calm, I get the impression he's good at what he does.


Maybe this wasn't his first time crashing a plane into a field.
 
2011-02-13 3:54:18 PM  
That was an impressively soft landing. Kudos to the pilot.

/ hates flying
// hates it
 
2011-02-13 4:42:25 PM  
I would hazard a guess that one of the reasons he didn't attempt a road landing was lack of landing gear. Since he lost oil pressure and his engine seized completely, he had no pressure (either hydraulic or compressed air) to lower his gear. In this case, since he's forced to perform a belly-landing, landing in a field is likely a safer alternative to a road.

All in all, a very cool head kept by the pilot in a sticky situation. Hats off.
 
2011-02-13 4:45:55 PM  

Airfoilsguy: I was waiting for the stall.


+1, that looked like anything but a stabilized approach.
 
2011-02-13 5:29:54 PM  
A propeller on a "seized" piston engine will not windmill.
 
2011-02-13 5:39:53 PM  

Farker1138: Airfoilsguy: I was waiting for the stall.

+1, that looked like anything but a stabilized approach.


Of course I would have probably done the same thing. Landing a fully functioning airplane is hard enough, doing it under stress with out an engine he did well.
It looks like he picked a field near a building that in case he really bit it there would be help near by.
 
2011-02-13 5:41:46 PM  

Bruce the Deuce: A propeller on a "seized" piston engine will not windmill.


Did you read the entire video description?

"When the engine seized it caused the reduction gearbox to disintegrate hence a windmillling prop and engine shut down with mags off and fuel cut. On inspection the cylinders completely solid, engine core since scrapped."
 
2011-02-13 5:41:53 PM  

Bruce the Deuce: A propeller on a "seized" piston engine will not windmill.


I was wondering about that myself. Maybe he ran out of gas and just made up the oil problem.

That or he shut the engine down to save it. Though it would still need tore down due to the prop strike when he crashed it.
 
2011-02-13 5:42:11 PM  

RoyBatty:
I landed a glider short of the runway about 20 years ago, and ditched into a field of wheat because I didn't think I could make it over the powerlines. Because of the wheat, because of the glider's skid, there was no damage at all, except for my ego, and the hour it took me to get the wheat out of every nook and cranny in the wing and fuselage. But of course, that was a craft meant to land off a runway.


Did you have to reimburse the farmer for the wheat that the glider took out? Does insurance take care of that?
 
2011-02-13 5:44:43 PM  

douchebag/hater: I;m all down with the height = safety but farking allah! There were roads he could have landed on.

What's up with that?


Roads have cars and usually have power lines one one side. Better to land in a field then to risk a head one with a Toyota or a power pole. Also if there are pedestrians on the road a plane with out an engine makes no noise so they wouldn't here you coming. Many a beach landing when tits up because people got in the way.
 
2011-02-13 5:46:54 PM  

Airfoilsguy: douchebag/hater: I;m all down with the height = safety but farking allah! There were roads he could have landed on.

What's up with that?

Roads have cars and usually have power lines one one side. Better to land in a field then to risk a head one with a Toyota or a power pole. Also if there are pedestrians on the road a plane with out an engine makes no noise so they wouldn't here you coming. Many a beach landing when tits up because people got in the way.


That and roads in the UK are notoriously narrow, and out in farm country there are usually stone fences on either side of the road with little shoulder area. I would not even try that in a simulation.
 
2011-02-13 5:48:56 PM  

ApatheticMonkey: RoyBatty:
I landed a glider short of the runway about 20 years ago, and ditched into a field of wheat because I didn't think I could make it over the powerlines. Because of the wheat, because of the glider's skid, there was no damage at all, except for my ego, and the hour it took me to get the wheat out of every nook and cranny in the wing and fuselage. But of course, that was a craft meant to land off a runway.

Did you have to reimburse the farmer for the wheat that the glider took out? Does insurance take care of that?


I never had to. It's quite possible the glider school gave the guy some amount every year to cover uh, unintentional short landings.

There was a lot of wheat jammed into the craft, but the craft stopped very quickly so it's not like it took out a huge swath of field.
 
2011-02-13 6:54:43 PM  
That thing came to a stop in a hurry!

Last time my uncle flew in a real plane the engine quit on him. There was a road in sight, but he chose a corn field instead for the reasons mentioned above. Turns out the road had just been repaved, but was not yet open to traffic and there are no suspended cables near it. It would have been the perfect place to set down. Instead his plane was beat to shiat by the corn (and yeah, his insurance covered that).

Funny thing, as he walked out of the cornfield there's a guy waiting for him by the road: "Hi, I'm with the FAA. Is there anything I can do to help?" Turns out he had just been driving by when he saw my uncle go down. He wound up being the investigator for the crash.

That was his second crash in a pretty short period of time. If it hadn't been for the passenger (who just happened to be an instructor) corroborating his story of engine failure, he might have lost his license. Not that it really matters since he just flies ultra-lights now.
 
2011-02-13 7:28:17 PM  
I'm a pilot on the Yak Demo Team so I'm getting a kick...
 
2011-02-13 7:50:46 PM  

Gravel Road Cop: I would hazard a guess that one of the reasons he didn't attempt a road landing was lack of landing gear. Since he lost oil pressure and his engine seized completely, he had no pressure (either hydraulic or compressed air) to lower his gear. In this case, since he's forced to perform a belly-landing, landing in a field is likely a safer alternative to a road.

All in all, a very cool head kept by the pilot in a sticky situation. Hats off.


Losing oil pressure has no effect on the air system. Yaks have both a main and a reserve pressure system to operate the gear and the brakes. He absolutely could have lowered the gear had he wanted to, however as others have mentioned, protocol for a rough field landing requires you to go in gear up.
 
2011-02-13 7:59:54 PM  

douchebag/hater: I;m all down with the height = safety but farking allah! There were roads he could have landed on.

What's up with that?


The only exception to "Don't make you problem someone else's." is talking to ATC.

Roads tend to attract telephone poles and other obstacles like trees...and cars. An open field is almost always preferable.
 
2011-02-13 9:13:00 PM  

RoyBatty: http://www.aaib.gov.uk/cms_resources.cfm?file=/YAK-50,%20G-YAKK%2008-​1​0.pdf

On examining the engine, the pilot identified that the
oil pressure adjustment valve was missing from the oil
scavenge pump housing (Figure 1). It was found in the
lower cowling with no evidence of the expected wire
locking. He believed that the valve had worked loose
and fallen out during the accident flight, causing the
oil loss. The aircraft had recently undergone extensive
maintenance which included an overhaul of the oil
scavenge pump assembly. Initial flights following this
work revealed a small oil leak in the area of the pump,
which at the time, was thought to be have been remedied
by an engineer tightening the small vertical bolts adjacent
to the pressure adjustment valve.


That 'engineer' had better lawyer up.
 
2011-02-13 10:38:34 PM  
He landed and walked away, so who should complain?

But if you follow along with the dialog in the clip, and follow it on a map of the UK, you'll see he often was quite lost as to where he was, and he seemed to indicate he was heading first in one direction, then in another, and aim himself towards some pretty far off targets, that he was almost certainly not going to get to.

Which is probably natural in the heat of the moment (but he said he was actually a flyer local to the area.)

But he landed about 14 miles southwest of where he reported he was landing (Bothel, not Orton). It took the other aircraft to correctly report his position.

Around 4 minutes in, you can see a windfarm, that's the Bothel wind farm, you can streetview it with google. (you can see this odd shaped field about 1/2 mile west of the wind farm in the video)

He then lands somewhere near there.
 
2011-02-13 11:56:38 PM  

RoyBatty: He landed and walked away, so who should complain?

But if you follow along with the dialog in the clip, and follow it on a map of the UK, you'll see he often was quite lost as to where he was, and he seemed to indicate he was heading first in one direction, then in another, and aim himself towards some pretty far off targets, that he was almost certainly not going to get to.

Which is probably natural in the heat of the moment (but he said he was actually a flyer local to the area.)

But he landed about 14 miles southwest of where he reported he was landing (Bothel, not Orton). It took the other aircraft to correctly report his position.

Around 4 minutes in, you can see a windfarm, that's the Bothel wind farm, you can streetview it with google. (you can see this odd shaped field about 1/2 mile west of the wind farm in the video)

He then lands somewhere near there.


thank you. I was trying to figure out where all that was, I was looking for that field up around Oulton. The whole Kirkbride/Bridekirk confusion had me looking up north when I couldn't find Orton (did they mean Lorton?)
 
2011-02-14 12:18:16 AM  

Vance Uppercut: thank you. I was trying to figure out where all that was, I was looking for that field up around Oulton. The whole Kirkbride/Bridekirk confusion had me looking up north when I couldn't find Orton (did they mean Lorton?)


There is an Orton, it's about 4 miles sw of Carlisle.
 
2011-02-14 12:20:39 AM  

Vance Uppercut: I was trying to figure out where all that was,


Except for when he was over Keswick, you sort of have to ignore everything else he says... :(

That whole area looks gorgeous -- I'd love to fly over it, drive it, live there.

/stuck in Phoenix
 
2011-02-14 12:44:48 AM  
this smacks of "viral" nonsense. who's with me?
 
2011-02-14 2:01:56 AM  

RoyBatty: Vance Uppercut: thank you. I was trying to figure out where all that was, I was looking for that field up around Oulton. The whole Kirkbride/Bridekirk confusion had me looking up north when I couldn't find Orton (did they mean Lorton?)

There is an Orton, it's about 4 miles sw of Carlisle.


OK, now I see it, even farther away from where he actually was than where I was looking.
 
2011-02-14 2:04:45 AM  

J13P: this smacks of "viral" nonsense. who's with me?


I don't think so, in this case.

/been wrong before tho
 
2011-02-14 8:07:24 AM  
Awesome job! Guy has freaking nerves of steel and ice in his veins. If he didn't get laid that night there's no justice in the world.
 
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