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(NJ.com)   Good neighbor: Operates noisy equipment indoors, with the windows closed. Dead neighbor: It's a portable generator   (nj.com) divider line
    More: Dumbass, police states, Darwin Awards, criminal negligence, asphyxiation, Medical Center, police Chief John Pieczyski  
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7004 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Mar 2010 at 5:19 PM (11 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2010-03-15 3:48:22 PM  
How did this guy make it to 49 years old?
 
2010-03-15 3:50:30 PM  
I have a neighbor across the way from me and when I walk by his house in the morning, I'm pretty sure his mini-van is in the garage, running, with the garage door closed.

I've seen this on more than one occasion, which leads me to believe that he's completely unaware of the dangers of such actions.

Or he's a real failure at suicide attempts.
 
2010-03-15 3:52:55 PM  
Well, that's one way to keep the noise levels down.
 
2010-03-15 4:12:09 PM  

Rev.K: he's completely unaware of the dangers of such actions.


Cars don't make much CO these days. While low oxygen can indeed asphyxiate a a person, that's not what kills people in situations like these. It's the CO.
 
2010-03-15 4:18:13 PM  
Protip: When working indoors, always use an electric generator, rather than a gas-powered one.
 
2010-03-15 5:22:42 PM  
What a Dork!!
 
2010-03-15 5:25:01 PM  

toddalmighty: Protip: When working indoors, always use an electric generator, rather than a gas-powered one.


Protip: yore a moran.

/Or else I just got snagged by a trawl line.
 
2010-03-15 5:25:16 PM  
farm3.static.flickr.comView Full Size

/approves
 
2010-03-15 5:25:38 PM  
The sad part is that he'll never know how combustion works.
 
2010-03-15 5:26:32 PM  

toddalmighty: Protip: When working indoors, always use an electric generator, rather than a gas-powered one.


wut?

Isn't the point of a generator to make electricity?
 
2010-03-15 5:29:05 PM  
a resident of the house called police state that several members of his family were sick


What?
 
2010-03-15 5:30:00 PM  

toddalmighty: Protip: When working indoors, always use an electric generator, rather than a gas-powered one.


Ha! Well done.
 
2010-03-15 5:31:18 PM  

Devil's Playground: a resident of the house called police state that several members of his family were sick


What?


Your read right. We're living in a police state!
 
2010-03-15 5:32:51 PM  

toddalmighty: Protip: When working indoors, always use an electric generator, rather than a gas-powered one.


Will do!
 
2010-03-15 5:34:03 PM  

toddalmighty: Protip: When working indoors, always use an electric generator, rather than a gas-powered one.


This is indeed good advice. You can plug it in to itself too, for perpetual-motion goodness....
 
2010-03-15 5:34:04 PM  
Ok, so next power outage I'll invite the annoying neighbor over, say we'll be watching a movie in the basement in a few minutes, why not go down and get comfortable, never mind the generator going, we'll need it for the movie.

\Flaws?
\\oh yea, no basement.
 
2010-03-15 5:35:29 PM  

thethirdrobotreturns: toddalmighty: Protip: When working indoors, always use an electric generator, rather than a gas-powered one.

wut?

Isn't the point of a generator to make electricity?


Sure, but sometimes you need an electric generator because all the electricity you've got is the wrong kind.

Seriously:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rotary_converter
 
2010-03-15 5:35:36 PM  

TheHighlandHowler: Cars don't make much CO these days.


No, but their engines do.
 
2010-03-15 5:37:59 PM  
 
2010-03-15 5:38:15 PM  

TheHighlandHowler: Cars don't make much CO these days. While low oxygen can indeed asphyxiate a a person, that's not what kills people in situations like these. It's the CO.


Yah, why don't you go test that there book talkin'.
 
2010-03-15 5:38:16 PM  

toddalmighty: Protip: When working indoors, always use an electric generator, rather than a gas-powered one.


I'm going to revisit this thread to see if this one-liner gets any more bites.

/amused
 
2010-03-15 5:38:22 PM  
The local firefighters used the bay next to my workplace to store their firetrucks when they were building a new station. They'd run the damn things every day for some reason, gassing everyone in the building. You'd think of all people, farkin firefighers would know not to do that. We had to yell at them a couple of times to stop being retards.
 
2010-03-15 5:41:52 PM  
Is subby implying that a dead neighbor can't be a good neighbor?
 
2010-03-15 5:42:51 PM  

dextrocardia: Is subby implying that a dead neighbor can't be a good neighbor?


They're usually quiet at least. Unless they die with their TV on loudly. Then they should die again.
 
2010-03-15 5:43:59 PM  
Poor sod. It's amazing how much CO those things will generate, especially the big cheap ones. My son ran his generator in his garage (with the door open). Within a minute or so, it triggered the CO detector in the house.

CO detectors are a good idea, folks. They could save your life.

So are inverters, by the way - a couple of big lead-acid batteries will keep your essential electrics running for a surprising amount of time. No CO hazard, either.
 
2010-03-15 5:44:39 PM  
like a dead neighbor... state farm is there!!
 
2010-03-15 5:48:58 PM  

Barfmaker: How did this guy make it to 49 years old?


Old drafty wooden frame windows.
 
2010-03-15 5:49:18 PM  

TheHighlandHowler: Rev.K: he's completely unaware of the dangers of such actions.

Cars don't make much CO these days. While low oxygen can indeed asphyxiate a a person, that's not what kills people in situations like these. It's the CO.


Sigh.

It's actually the low oxygen, but not in the way you think it is.

CO also binds to hemoglobin -- more preferentially than for oxygen. It's also heavier than air, and thus tends to fill its container, displacing oxygen upwards. In the end, CO poisoning kills you because you don't get enough oxygen in your lungs, and your blood stream is binding to the CO instead, anyway.

But in the end you die of the lack of oxygen, not the extra CO.
 
2010-03-15 5:55:02 PM  

TheHighlandHowler: Cars don't make much CO these days. While low oxygen can indeed asphyxiate a a person, that's not what kills people in situations like these. It's the CO.


While that is true that new cars produce less CO2, that statement is based fuel economy for distance traveled. When it comes to idling, CO2 output is purely a matter of fuel burned to air ratio, which hasn't changed much (typically 9 to 1). Idling RPMS are roughly the same for all 4 stroke motors. The only differing factor for CO2 output is largely based the displacement of the engine (and possibly the compatibility of some newer engines for cylinder deactivation). Since we've standardized on fuel injection, an auto's CO2 output at idle hasn't changed much in 30 years.

In other words, it may now take you 30 minutes in your 2010 model instead of 25 minutes in a 1960's model to suffocate in a closed garage.
 
2010-03-15 5:55:57 PM  
Jeez. If I were cold I'ld use something safe. Like an Hibachi. Duh.
 
2010-03-15 6:03:55 PM  

toddalmighty: Protip: When working indoors, always use an electric generator, rather than a gas-powered one.


Personally, I use a mouse on a wheel.
 
2010-03-15 6:04:53 PM  

MrSteve007: TheHighlandHowler: Cars don't make much CO these days. While low oxygen can indeed asphyxiate a a person, that's not what kills people in situations like these. It's the CO.

While that is true that new cars produce less CO2, that statement is based fuel economy for distance traveled. When it comes to idling, CO2 output is purely a matter of fuel burned to air ratio, which hasn't changed much (typically 9 to 1). Idling RPMS are roughly the same for all 4 stroke motors. The only differing factor for CO2 output is largely based the displacement of the engine (and possibly the compatibility of some newer engines for cylinder deactivation). Since we've standardized on fuel injection, an auto's CO2 output at idle hasn't changed much in 30 years.

In other words, it may now take you 30 minutes in your 2010 model instead of 25 minutes in a 1960's model to suffocate in a closed garage.


1. You're confusing CO with CO2. An engine that's running well should only produce CO2 and H2O, but if the air/fuel ratio isn't right or combustion just isn't happening efficiently, more CO may be formed.
2. The mass of fuel and air pumped through an engine at idle is more a matter of combustion efficiency and friction than displacement or RPM.
 
2010-03-15 6:05:32 PM  

MrSteve007: TheHighlandHowler: Cars don't make much CO these days. While low oxygen can indeed asphyxiate a a person, that's not what kills people in situations like these. It's the CO.

While that is true that new cars produce less CO2, that statement is based fuel economy for distance traveled. When it comes to idling, CO2 output is purely a matter of fuel burned to air ratio, which hasn't changed much (typically 9 to 1). Idling RPMS are roughly the same for all 4 stroke motors. The only differing factor for CO2 output is largely based the displacement of the engine (and possibly the compatibility of some newer engines for cylinder deactivation). Since we've standardized on fuel injection, an auto's CO2 output at idle hasn't changed much in 30 years.

In other words, it may now take you 30 minutes in your 2010 model instead of 25 minutes in a 1960's model to suffocate in a closed garage.


CO not CO2

Link (new window)http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_monoxide_poisoning#Suicide
 
X15
2010-03-15 6:10:25 PM  

chopit: The local firefighters used the bay next to my workplace to store their firetrucks when they were building a new station. They'd run the damn things every day for some reason, gassing everyone in the building. You'd think of all people, farkin firefighers would know not to do that. We had to yell at them a couple of times to stop being retards.


Most firetrucks run on Diesel, which doesn't produce CO. So while still impolite, it's not nearly as unsafe.
 
2010-03-15 6:26:49 PM  
I really wish my neighbors would follow this guy's example.
 
2010-03-15 6:31:14 PM  

toddalmighty: Protip: When working indoors, always use an electric generator, rather than a gas-powered one.


Todd, you made my day!!!!!! too funny , thanks for the laugh!!!!!
 
2010-03-15 6:32:29 PM  
...and Im Tom Dubet, this has been another...
/not obscure if i knew how his name was spelled...
 
2010-03-15 6:42:09 PM  

This text is now purple: CO also binds to hemoglobin -- more preferentially than for oxygen. It's also heavier than air, and thus tends to fill its container, displacing oxygen upwards.


Carbon monoxide is not heavier than air (although carbon dioxide is). The molecular weight of CO is the same as nitrogen (N2) and less than O2.
 
2010-03-15 6:47:14 PM  
farm3.static.flickr.comView Full Size

Just remember, if you hang in there long enough, good things can happen in this world. I mean, look at me.
 
2010-03-15 7:21:38 PM  
I had a tenant do this a few months ago. The dumbaass was shocked, simply SHOCKED, to get an eviction notice.
 
2010-03-15 7:27:54 PM  

MrSteve007: TheHighlandHowler: Cars don't make much CO these days. While low oxygen can indeed asphyxiate a a person, that's not what kills people in situations like these. It's the CO.

While that is true that new cars produce less CO2, that statement is based fuel economy for distance traveled. When it comes to idling, CO2 output is purely a matter of fuel burned to air ratio, which hasn't changed much (typically 9 to 1). Idling RPMS are roughly the same for all 4 stroke motors. The only differing factor for CO2 output is largely based the displacement of the engine (and possibly the compatibility of some newer engines for cylinder deactivation). Since we've standardized on fuel injection, an auto's CO2 output at idle hasn't changed much in 30 years.

In other words, it may now take you 30 minutes in your 2010 model instead of 25 minutes in a 1960's model to suffocate in a closed garage.


You're forgetting the catalytic converter.
 
2010-03-15 7:41:37 PM  
wow this website sucks -- they even have a page hijacking add that's so awesome i bet people cant get enough of this site
 
2010-03-15 8:03:06 PM  
See, now, I'm torn.

On the one hand, this story is an illustration of the importance of decent science education in our country.

OTOH, if ignorance of basic scientific principles and cause and effect and whatnot causes stupid people to remove themselves from the gene pool, well, that can only benefit the rest of us, right?
 
2010-03-15 9:33:50 PM  

Ivo Shandor:
Carbon monoxide is not heavier than air (although carbon dioxide is). The molecular weight of CO is the same as nitrogen (N2) and less than O2.


wtf are you talking about?

CO = 28 g/mol
O2 = 16 g/mol
N2 = 28g/mol

while the total mass of air may be about 29 g/mol CO will pretty muc stay where it's emitted. it will still fill a room if there's a source pumping it in. like a generator.
 
2010-03-15 9:49:58 PM  
Here in the NY 'burbs we're looking at getting our power back late this week or maybe early next week - so the generators are a-humming. One good neighbor has a cheap one that's as loud as a lawnmower. He runs it in his garage with the door open all night long for that extra thrust of sound. It would be wrong if I strolled over and shut his garage door, wouldn't it?
 
2010-03-15 10:06:12 PM  

Pathman: Ivo Shandor:
Carbon monoxide is not heavier than air (although carbon dioxide is). The molecular weight of CO is the same as nitrogen (N2) and less than O2.

wtf are you talking about?

CO = 28 g/mol
O2 = 16 g/mol
N2 = 28g/mol

while the total mass of air may be about 29 g/mol CO will pretty muc stay where it's emitted. it will still fill a room if there's a source pumping it in. like a generator.


Given his initial statement I think the part about O2 is a mistake and he meant to say CO2.
 
2010-03-15 10:07:24 PM  

Pathman: wtf are you talking about?

CO = 28 g/mol
O2 = 16 g/mol
N2 = 28g/mol


You might want to double-check the middle one...
 
2010-03-15 10:10:40 PM  
Thanks to morans as these, generators will have to include
CO detectors and O2 sensors that shut down the engine as applicable.
$150 or more added to the cost of each unit.

The reset should be a 25 character single use downloadable key from
the manufacturer that costs the user $30 each time it is needed.
 
2010-03-15 10:24:44 PM  
JesseL: 1. You're confusing CO with CO2. An engine that's running well should only produce CO2 and H2O, but if the air/fuel ratio isn't right or combustion just isn't happening efficiently, more CO may be formed.
============================================

Um, no. Engines produce all sorts of nasty crap. Catalytic converters do cut down on them (a LOT) but it's not 100%. Nor is it everything.

Engines produce lots of CO2 and CO. Both can suffocate you. CO will just do the job a little quicker.
 
2010-03-15 10:45:02 PM  

chopit: The local firefighters used the bay next to my workplace to store their firetrucks when they were building a new station. They'd run the damn things every day for some reason, gassing everyone in the building. You'd think of all people, farkin firefighers would know not to do that. We had to yell at them a couple of times to stop being retards.


It's called over-maintenance. They over-maintain the vehicles so they break down faster, thus requiring an occasional purchase of the newest spiffy fire equipment with the stretched-to-the-limit tax resources of the jurisdiction.

I'm not kidding about this.
 
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