Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(BBC)   How pure is your beer?   (news.bbc.co.uk) divider line
    More: Interesting  
•       •       •

24678 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 May 2006 at 5:19 AM (14 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



209 Comments     (+0 »)
 


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2006-05-02 12:20:36 PM  
That article was bunk
 
2006-05-02 12:21:13 PM  
When I used to run a grad student pub, one of the microbrew beer companies we bought directly from brought in the standard ingredients form the industry made up for its membership to submit to the state. The idea was, have a comprehensive list of all possible ingredients, and the individual brewery just checks off the applicable.

There were some surprising entries on the list. Wood pulp, things like that.

But the most surprising was the inclusion of urea.

I looked at the company rep. "Urea?"
"Yep. Urea. Imagine that."

Before then, I thought "pisswater" was a joke.
 
2006-05-02 12:24:08 PM  
Robobagpiper: But the most surprising was the inclusion of urea.

I looked at the company rep. "Urea?"
"Yep. Urea. Imagine that."

Before then, I thought "pisswater" was a joke.


Not suprising at all. This is actually used as a yeast nutrient. Healthy, happy yeast = tastey beer.
 
2006-05-02 12:27:19 PM  
Add me to the list of homebrewers in the thread...

As far as urea, you can use it to denature proteins, but only at really high concentrations, and there are other agents they use to precipitate suspended proteins out of the beer... maybe it's thrown in to provide a fixed nitrogen source for the yeast? Whack.

Just read on Wikipedia that it can be used as a browning agent on pretzels or as a cig "flavor enhancer" so maybe it affects color or flavor... still whack.
 
2006-05-02 12:28:02 PM  
I was in Texas for a while. Shiner is not good.

Said grad student bar I ran for a year, at one point in the past (or so I'm told) sold the majority of Shiner Bock sold in kegs. Back when Shiner was a microbrew, that is.

There were consistency issues with the batches in those days, but overall, the Shiner was highly regarded.

Something happened when they were bought out a big brewing company, I was told. It just wasn't the same after.

jcache, ever try anything from the Brenham brewery? Good stuff, before they shut down.
 
2006-05-02 12:29:15 PM  
adenosine
[Urea]
Not suprising at all. This is actually used as a yeast nutrient.


Okay, that makes sense.

It's still pretty funny to think about.
 
2006-05-02 12:29:31 PM  
Heh... thanks adenosine... beat me to it :)
 
2006-05-02 12:31:17 PM  
South Carolina BigFish: At that time I was under the impression that Busch beer was made with corn and bud/light was made with rice. He told me that all AB beers and all its competitor were made with rice, and I believed him. great man. knew a ton about the mega beers.

I've seen a billboard within the past year here in Illinois that proclaimed that Busch is proudly brewed from Illinois corn. Damn near drove off the road from the shuddering that caused.

/haven't touched a Busch in years
//still made me shudder
 
2006-05-02 12:37:09 PM  
hargoni it was a major, major producer in both the Canadian and international market.


Kokanee?!?!?!

/jk ;)
//much love for B.C. IPAs
///and that "Backhand of god" stout
 
2006-05-02 12:39:55 PM  
For my fellow southerners lemme hear ya say Hell Yes for Sweetwater Brewing Co.!

Try their new imperial stout: Happy Ending

//Mmmm 420, Sweet Georgia Brown, Blue, IPA, Exodus Porter
///Sweetwater is the best brewery tour ever. EVER. Soooo much free beer.
 
2006-05-02 12:47:01 PM  
rocinante721

As I homebrewer, I'd be interested in getting my hands on some beta-glucanse (beta-glycosidase; cellulase).

These breakdown the unfermentable cellulose left behind by the grain used for beer.


Beta-glucanase doesn't break down cellulose (of which there is little to none in beer). It breaks down (get this) beta-glucans! Beta-glucans are complex carbohydrates found in malt that have a tendency to form a gel in situations of high-sheer and sudden cooling. This can pose a problem for brewers during the lautering stage (separating the wort from the spent grains).

While there are enzymes in malt that can break down beta-glucans, they are very temperature sensitive and easy to inactivate too early. Some brewers use what are called "exogenous enzymes" or enzymes from and outside source, usually fungal, sometimes bacterial, and are usually more insensitive to higher temperatures.


I'd be interested in how kick-ass I can make a barleywine with all that extra available sugar (though it might taste horrible; bring with it all the extra tannins found in grain husks).

Wouldn't taste horrible, as the extraction of tannins from the husk have nothing to do with breaking down the extra carbohydrates (also called beta-limit dextrins). You start extracting too many tannins when you are mashing for too long and at too high of a temperature. In fact, using these enzymes will actually speed up the mashing process (unless you are making a lite beer and want NO leftover carb's).

/master's degree in brewing.
//quality control lab employee at regional craft brewer.
 
2006-05-02 12:47:41 PM  
As much as I tend to disagree with some of the comments in the other threads, it's nice to see that a metric assload (love that phrase in the other headline) of Farkers know their beer.

www.beeradvocate.com

Penn Weizen and Celebrator Dopplebock ftw

Westy 12~game over, man. Game over.
 
2006-05-02 12:51:26 PM  
Oh, and if you're ever near Pittsburgh, do yourself a favor and make a visit to our local John Harvards.

Andy the brewer is a genius, and his fruit beers are beyond compare.

Church is good too, and D's, and Fatheads,

/loves a good craft beer
//lucky enough to live in Pennsylvania, home of some outstanding breweries
 
sp
2006-05-02 12:55:14 PM  
I have a number of factors I use to determine the beer I drink on a particular night. The main factor is how many I plan to drink.

Beer doesn't age well, so by the time most imports reach your lips, they aren't in primo condition.
 
2006-05-02 1:07:45 PM  
ian.m

Beta-glucanase doesn't break down cellulose (of which there is little to none in beer).


I figured an different English-American definition of the enzyme function (I'm a biochemist, enzymologist).

I am talking about using a fungal cellulase to break down the cellulose in the mash (plenty of that!), not what is in the wort already.

As the solid grist breaks down into fermentable sugars, I expect leaching of all the tannins, etc. into the mash, wouldn't I ?


/master's degree in brewing.
//quality control lab employee at regional craft brewer.



You profile says Redhook, so you got A-B for a pimp.

Perhaps you can explain to me why after A-B bought into RH, they were available everywhere in NYC, but now, it is rare to find a RH on tap.

Bait & switch by the A-B distibutors?

Is that New Hampshire brewery still up & running at capacity?
 
2006-05-02 1:16:36 PM  
ProtestWarrior

If you ever get to Harrisburg, you've got to try the Appalachian Brewing Company on Cameron St. They have a smaller location in Gettysburg, too, with all of the same great beers.

/not from Pa. but heartily endorses the ABC
 
2006-05-02 1:20:12 PM  
[image from web.dailycamera.com too old to be available]

/Enjoy.
 
2006-05-02 1:20:33 PM  
I figured an different English-American definition of the enzyme function (I'm a biochemist, enzymologist).

I am talking about using a fungal cellulase to break down the cellulose in the mash (plenty of that!), not what is in the wort already.


Ahh, so you're calling it cellulose because it makes up part of the cell walls, not because its actually "cellulose."


As the solid grist breaks down into fermentable sugars, I expect leaching of all the tannins, etc. into the mash, wouldn't I ?


No more so than any regular brew. Again, its time and temp that govern the amount of tannins that are leeched from the grain. Go too long and/or too hot and you'll start getting that harsh tannin bitterness and astringency.


Bait & switch by the A-B distibutors?

Is that New Hampshire brewery still up & running at capacity?


Dunno about the distribution. I don't think Portsmouth is running at capacity. As I recall they have the same system we do here in Seattle, but they aren't cranking out as much product as we are.
 
2006-05-02 1:21:56 PM  
2006-05-02 11:56:36 AM South Carolina BigFish

Rice has much less taste than corn

I'd rather have a Bud than a Miller if I'm in a place where I can't get anything tastier (think of the Redskins or Ravens games). (That's why I like baseball... local craft brews on tap at Camden Yards!)

I believe that Yeungling uses corn, but their Porter and Black & Tan beers are dark and hearty enough that most people will never notice it.
 
Noc
2006-05-02 1:23:04 PM  
mmmmmmmm propylene glycol alginate...
 
2006-05-02 1:24:47 PM  
saw a good quote the other day.

"Life begins at 60.. 1.060 that is."
 
2006-05-02 1:25:33 PM  
2006-05-02 12:55:14 PM sp

Beer doesn't age well, so by the time most imports reach your lips, they aren't in primo condition.

I agree... that's why when I drink imports, they tend to be bottle conditioned like Lindeman's Framboise.
[image from merchantduvin.com too old to be available]
 
2006-05-02 1:26:38 PM  
If anyone has a picture, I'd love to see the label from Maggie's Dog Slobber... apparently a hit in Washington and Idaho.
 
2006-05-02 1:26:59 PM  
I am a huge fan of Theakston's Old Peculier. I'm probably better off not knowing what's in it (besides "Fuggle" hops), though.

The boy and I make our own beer several times a year. Hooray!
 
2006-05-02 1:29:26 PM  
No love for the Magic Hat around here?
 
2006-05-02 1:33:35 PM  
Robobagpiper: Brenham was tried Not bad at all but gone. Fred beers are OK but I like Live Oak better.

Most of my current beers come from grain kits from Austin Homebrew Supply. Guilty of owning too many carboys. Lagering fridge is the next step. Been bottling so far but a keg/lagering fridge would be a nice addition to the hobby plus lots less bottle washing and capping, depending on how it goes.
 
2006-05-02 1:34:33 PM  
Hotaine

Much love for Magic Hat Number 9.
 
2006-05-02 1:38:26 PM  
the magic hat HIPA is really good.. my current fav is the Dogfish Head 60,90 and 120 minute IPAs. those guys rock
 
2006-05-02 1:40:04 PM  
ian.m Ahh, so you're calling it cellulose because it makes up part of the cell walls, not because its actually "cellulose."

Cellulose, the beta-glucose polymer in plants which give them structural rigity (husks, wood, cotton, etc), as opposed to the alpha-glucose polymers (starch) that the amylases break down.

Bioengineers are looking at making fungal cellulases for breaking down the bulk of biomass (corn stalks, wood) i/o to make ethanol-based fuel viable.

My thought is why not try it to make a uber-rediculous gravity wort.

... or i could just render it down by boiling longer.

Dunno about the distribution. I don't think Portsmouth is running at capacity. As I recall they have the same system we do here in Seattle, but they aren't cranking out as much product as we are.

A-B is notorious for their marketing savvy (read: backstabbing).

My guess (semi-confirmed by friends in-the-know) is that they bought into RH & Pyramid to satisfy the distributors looking for increasing craft beer availability, so they can say "Hey! We got Redhook! Craft brew for you!"

Then, over time, they just stop pushing the product unless someone asks for it.

Spend more time selling the Bud for larger profit, brand awareness.

Make no mistake ... they'd rather sell Bud than RH, even though their part owners.

All in a plan to cover their bases as Macrobrews are continuing to dwindle as Craftbrew sales are skyrocking.

hence the reason for buying into RH & Pyramid and making stuff like BARE KNUCKLE STOUT & ANHEUSER WORLD SELECT (which was god-awful!!!).

Look out! They could purposely under-sell RH i/o to make it financially unstable, offer a buyout of stock for majority ownership as a 'bailout', shut down the Brewery (the ol' Standard Oil maneuver).

Any fears of this?

/ curious
 
2006-05-02 2:02:41 PM  
Any fears of this?

haven't heard any so far...
 
2006-05-02 2:09:02 PM  
Haven't heard of that, but I have heard that Flying Dog (Colorado) is interested in buying Frederick Brewing (Maryland). Fredrick Brewing is in receivership, having overbuilt their physical plant several years ago. I like their ESB and HopFest (seasonal), but who knows whether they will still be around after the Dog takes over. Oh well, I'd rather have them bought out by a craft brewer than by a megabrewer, for the reasons y'all have been discussing here.
 
2006-05-02 2:31:22 PM  
madcharlie:

"If you are referring to urine, I'm gonna have to disagree. Urine is actually fairly clean. In a desperate situation you can drink your own urine 2-3 times before it becomes toxic."

Or I could just drink my Natural Light in the fridge. :/ Same diff.
 
2006-05-02 3:10:31 PM  
2006-05-02 01:16:36 PM zymurgist
If you ever get to Harrisburg, you've got to try the Appalachian Brewing Company on Cameron St. They have a smaller location in Gettysburg, too, with all of the same great beers


I wholeheartdly agree. i travel to harrisburg quite a bit for work, i pop in there occassionally. great beers all around. (the space is very cool, too. they say it is the "largest craft brewery in teh US", but i have heard others make that claim, too.) the food, surprisingly, isn't that good, tho. pulled pork sandwich was like jerky, and the pizza smelled and tasted like drying feet.
 
2006-05-02 3:12:14 PM  
99.44%. It floats on water, too.

/not very good beer, just pure
 
2006-05-02 3:23:25 PM  
Yuengling Lager and Victory HopDevil is all I need.

/Don't care what's in them
//full of tasty goodness
///I sometimes get Golden Monkeys on my back
////PA Beer rocks (must be all the Germans around here...)
 
2006-05-02 3:29:08 PM  
[image from img305.imageshack.us too old to be available]

3 faves

/haven't met too many beers I don't like actually
//except Blue Moon
 
2006-05-02 3:34:55 PM  
Speaking as one who has been there and drunk that, I can testify firsthand that German beers DO NOT cause the hangovers the way American beers do. Coors in particular makes me so sick I want to die, and I am nbot the first person to experience this reaction

The reason is simple: formaldehyde is ruinously deadly to yeast, and even a few drops will kill a huge vat of fermenting wort; I have seen it clarify in a matter of minutes.

You people who beef about pollution of our air and water ought to invest your time in improving something useful.
 
2006-05-02 3:53:31 PM  
Did someone ask about beer from Wales? Two breweries spring to mind.

Brains - the reason that the English think the Welsh are enthusiastic about education lies in the ancient advertising slogan "It's Brains you need".

Felinfoel - Pronounced "Feeling foul" even by those who know it should really be "velinvoil".

/Need a slash afterwards
//Or two
///Do you find that once you've started you've got to keep going?
 
2006-05-02 3:55:10 PM  
Just bottled my first batch of home-brew (a brown ale done the easy way, with LME and steeped grain) last night. Great to see the thread.

/now here's hoping the bottles don't explode
//Augustinerbraeu Muenchner,
///Leffe Blonde
////Smithwick's
//and Sam'l Smith's Oatmeal Stout FTW!
 
2006-05-02 3:55:36 PM  
2006-05-02 03:23:25 PM chenzo


Yuengling Lager and Victory HopDevil is all I need.

/Don't care what's in them
//full of tasty goodness
///I sometimes get Golden Monkeys on my back
////PA Beer rocks (must be all the Germans around here...)


Hopdevil is excellent (for the hop-lover, obviously). Used to live 2 miles from the brewery and fill up my growler there.
 
2006-05-02 3:58:55 PM  
P.S.:

Beer geeks will know that the Reinheitsgebot specifies water, barley and hops as the ONLY allowable ingredients for beer...

...but that won't make beer, because you need yeast as well. But they didn't know that yeast was involved until three hundred years later. All they knew was that they used the sediment from the last batch to make the next batch.

/the more you know
 
2006-05-02 4:22:08 PM  
[image from realbeer.com too old to be available]
 
2006-05-02 4:31:54 PM  
platypusjones

Ever been to Triumph Brewery in Princeton, NJ? I seem to remember having some good beer and good food there. I don't get over to NJ much, so it has been a while.
 
2006-05-02 4:50:31 PM  
"Psycho Therapist," if you are brewing your beer without a hydrometer, you better invest $10 and buy one.

A hydrometer looks like a thermometer, with a ball of lead shot on the bottom; the farther it sinks, the more alcohol you have, the higher it floats, the more sugar.

I pulled a BIG BAD boo-boo, when I was running a Geordie Bitter British (try to say that three times fast when you've killed a cold six-pack)batch, and running the alcohol up to about 9.3%, which is way too stiff anyway.

I forgot to factor in, alcohol is about 750 g/l in weight, and water is 1000; at 9.3%, my beer would have had a specific gravity of 976.75, but when I bottled it, I corked it at around 1020, instead of the 990 I needed.

KERRRRRRRRRRRRR------------BLOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOEY!

Later on, I also gave away five gallons of over-stout beer, at about 11.2%, and god what a mess: I had people passed out up and down the block, people choppin' up furniture with samurai swords in the front yard, and I was the whole damn weekend pulling cars out of ditches!

Ah, the good old days................
 
2006-05-02 4:51:22 PM  
Thanks, Zoilos!
 
2006-05-02 4:55:06 PM  
If any of you home brewers are interested, you can usually pick up an old discarded fridge in good working order at Starvation Army.

You can unplug it and keep it in the garage, then run a VERY SMALL light bulb for a heat source--it doesn't take much--to keep your vat at a perfect 86 F to hasten fermentation. It also keeps out fruit flies, which are the bane of every brewer; one fly can ruin 20 gallons of good beer, turn it all to vinegar.

Once your batch is fermented to the right level, you can plug it in and chill it down to about 29 F, and draw off the sediment that way. You also want to age your beer at 54 F or so, and a cheap fridge is ideal for that.
 
2006-05-02 4:55:43 PM  
[image from i6.photobucket.com too old to be available]
 
2006-05-02 4:56:35 PM  
2006-05-02 12:55:14 PM sp
Beer doesn't age well, so by the time most imports reach your lips, they aren't in primo condition.


I lol'd.
My beer cellar disagrees most heartily with that.

Anyone got a bottle of Vertical Epic 02.02.02 they'd like to sell me?
 
2006-05-02 5:23:13 PM  
[image from abita.com too old to be available]

Abita Turbodog

recently came across this brew... quite good.
 
2006-05-02 5:35:02 PM  
Ahhh... German beer... delicious...

Also, I am wondering if anyone here has ever tried Bell's Oberon? It is kind of limited to the Michigan area but if you ever run across it try it. Absolutely marvelous.
 
Displayed 50 of 209 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | » | Newest | Show all



This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking





On Twitter




In Other Media
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.