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(BBC)   How pure is your beer?   (news.bbc.co.uk) divider line
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24678 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 May 2006 at 5:19 AM (14 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



209 Comments     (+0 »)
 
 
2006-05-01 11:34:28 PM  
Not pure enough to erase my memory.
 
2006-05-01 11:35:15 PM  
Last beer I had: Weihenstephaner Dunkelweizen, from the "world's oldest brewery," predating even the Reinheitsgebot beer purity act of 1516. I'd say it's pure enough.
 
2006-05-01 11:36:26 PM  
on the occassions that i do drink, it's generally NewCastle. you tell me how pure it is.
 
2006-05-01 11:38:06 PM  
Very. I don't have any.
 
2006-05-01 11:38:21 PM  
If she's drinking with me, who cares.

[image from newsimg.bbc.co.uk too old to be available]
 
2006-05-01 11:39:07 PM  
How many kilo's do you need, submitter?
 
2006-05-01 11:39:33 PM  
I love when they write an article including the chemical names just in order to scare the uninformed. Dihydrogen monoxide is gonna kill us all!
 
2006-05-01 11:44:56 PM  
Although both are safe food additives, they hardly sound tempting, and beer drinkers would most likely wish to avoid them.

DESPITE THE FACT THAT THE ONLY INFORMATION PROVIDED ABOUT THESE THINGS IS THAT THEY ARE SAFE FOOD ADDITIVES, I FEAR THEM AND WISH TO AVOID THEM!
 
xam
2006-05-01 11:47:13 PM  
TYPICAL BEER ADDITIVES
Betaglucanase
Ammonia caramel
Rhoiso-alpha acids
Sulphur dioxide
Protease
Amyloglucosidase
Propylene glycol alginate
Silicone

/tastes like old frothingslosher
 
2006-05-01 11:51:22 PM  
It's always more pure before rather than after.
 
2006-05-01 11:51:38 PM  
Trying to compare non-German beers to the Reinheitsgebot is ridiculous.

There are a lot of great beers which don't use funky preservatives that would not measure up to the Reinheitsgebot. Think of all of the great Belgian beers, especially the Trappist ales, some of the best beer in the world. The sugar used to make those excellent ales would not be allowed.

German beer is great, I'll grant that. The Germans do what they do very well. But great beer can be more than just water, hops, yeast and malted grain.

I wholly agree that there should be more visibility on what additives and preservatives are used on beer. But don't trot out the Reinheitsgebot as the ultimately benchmark on purity. Let's remember the last time we let the Germans be the arbiters of purity.

/wait, did I just Godwin a beer thread?
 
2006-05-01 11:54:03 PM  
I, for one, only drink the purest, most obscure beers I can find. I don't like them, but when I tell other people I drink them, it impresses them; especially if they've never heard of them.
 
2006-05-01 11:55:35 PM  
shivashakti: wait, did I just Godwin a beer thread?

And impressively.
 
2006-05-01 11:58:31 PM  
godwinned before the liters could get to it
 
Rat
2006-05-01 11:59:39 PM  
Always a good time for this:

[image from shiner.com too old to be available]

©
 
xam
2006-05-02 12:05:01 AM  
beer or ale?
 
2006-05-02 12:05:06 AM  
camelclub: It's always more pure before rather than after.

If you are referring to urine, I'm gonna have to disagree. Urine is actually fairly clean. In a desperate situation you can drink your own urine 2-3 times before it becomes toxic.
 
2006-05-02 12:08:22 AM  
I was in Texas for a while. Shiner is not good.
 
2006-05-02 12:27:16 AM  
I was in Salt Lake City last week and had two of the best beers I've ever tasted...

From the Wasatch Brewing Company in Park City, UT:

Evolutionary Ale and Wasatch Heffeweissen. AWESOME.

Sadly, I couldn't find the Polygamy Porter that they're famous for. :(
 
2006-05-02 1:00:44 AM  
BGates: I was in Texas for a while. Shiner is not good.

BLASPHEMY!
 
2006-05-02 1:15:34 AM  
I don't know about beer, but the Vodka I drink is one step up from industrial solvent.
 
2006-05-02 1:21:55 AM  
PseudoNic: BLASPHEMY!

Come to the Pacific Northwest and yo might agree.
 
2006-05-02 1:37:49 AM  
Nobody around to piss in the bottle so I'm pretty sure it's pure beer.
 
2006-05-02 5:24:05 AM  
Does the phrase "German Purity Law" make anyone else nervous?
 
2006-05-02 5:25:58 AM  
I drank Stella Artois steadily all weekend. I feel rank.
 
2006-05-02 5:27:34 AM  
I live 2 miles from Bell's. Life is wonderful!

Amyloglucosidase

Amy Loglucosidase? Is she hot?
 
2006-05-02 5:30:28 AM  
yeah shiner is pretty weak, but at least it's "local." St. Arnolds is better in my tummy and seems less mass produced. I wasn't aware that ingredient listing wasn't manditory in the EU... I guess here they can just hide all the funky stuff under "natural and artificial flavors" anyways...
 
2006-05-02 5:31:46 AM  
Just to let you in on something:

Coors Light- 550 Ingredients
Miller Lite- 900 Ingredients
Bud Light- 1600 Ingredients

Your body is better off drinking a micro beer or german lager. Heck, 2 wheat beers a day is actually good for you. Hacker Pschorr or Franziskaner Hefeweizen FTW!
 
2006-05-02 5:32:16 AM  
Beer tip: The Scottish "Innis & Gunn"'s oak aged beer is good.

Flowery first impression, smooth beer, oak notes a la whiskey.
 
2006-05-02 5:34:05 AM  
Not pure enough. There's always way too much beer in my alcohol.
 
2006-05-02 5:36:00 AM  
i hope i don't find out newcastle is full of preservatives, i can brew a very close brown ale and i don't use any.
 
2006-05-02 5:41:29 AM  
At this moment, I'm drinking Steel Reserve, so the faux beer-snobs can make fun of me.

But then again, a little over a month ago, I was drinking at the Augustiner brewery in Munich, just in time for Strong Beer Season.

Thus, I too can be both 1) low rent and 2) a braggart.
 
2006-05-02 5:42:13 AM  
I am....
 
2006-05-02 5:42:31 AM  
binnster gets it.
 
2006-05-02 5:44:22 AM  
Does the phrase "German Purity Law" make anyone else nervous?

Brain: But Germany invaded Poland in 1939!

German Tour Guide: We were invited. Punch was served.
 
2006-05-02 5:52:51 AM  
Rant:

Why is a drug that is a pure toxin our only legal intoxicant? And why would anyone choose beer over other liquors for getting drunk? I enjoy a cold beer every once in a while, but there are more efficient ways of obtaining drunkeness. And all the people my age drinking light beer to get drunk disgust me. That sh*t tastes like slimy water going down. Almost like brown water mixed with saliva.

I'd much rather take benzodiazepines to get a GABA stupor. Honestly Id rather take GHB, which also induces a profound euphoria but otherwise feels exactly like alochol without the hangover or brain damage. (Alcohol is the only drug I know of that damages every tissue in the body). Any of these in pill form would be easier to regulate does-wise than alcohol. Personally I would prefer opiates the most in social circumstances but I can't recommend those because of their addictive potential. Anyways my last thing:

"Our national drug is alcohol. We tend to regard the use of any other drug with special horror."
-William S. Burroughs
 
2006-05-02 6:06:39 AM  
Great, another Fark beer thread.
 
2006-05-02 6:11:08 AM  
I'd tap that keg

[image from weeklynewz.com too old to be available]

Did I just really say that?
 
2006-05-02 6:15:12 AM  
[image from tankard.org too old to be available]

/Rock on
 
2006-05-02 6:19:32 AM  
Pyramid Hefe Wiezen!
Guinness!
Hangovers!
 
2006-05-02 6:23:38 AM  
Farking close to water!
 
2006-05-02 6:28:06 AM  
I'd say my beer is fairly pure being as it's homebrew. I have a Scottish Wee Heavy on tap and a batck of Maple Porter right behind it.

What to make for summer...? I'm thinking an IPA or a Hefeweizen.
 
2006-05-02 6:34:31 AM  
There's something unsettlingly Hitlerian about that headline.
 
2006-05-02 6:37:31 AM  
It all comes from the same horse.

/doesn't it?
//That's what my dad told me
 
2006-05-02 6:40:01 AM  
As a homebrewer I've used dried algea to make beer clearer. It doesn't stabalize the head of foam, adding corn sugar does that. Also fish gut rather ground up dried fish swim bladder is used in beer to make it clearer.
 
2006-05-02 7:05:26 AM  
beer beer beer beerbeerbeerbeebbeerbberrbbebeeerbbeerbeerbe

beer


wow i amdrnk\

nnot off of beer, though
 
2006-05-02 7:13:08 AM  
Beer is pre-digested rotten stuff. Talking of "purity" seems a little like a misnomer.

/weisbier is good, someone said? Yay!
 
2006-05-02 7:20:59 AM  
Mass marketed beers are cool only in that they are a product of fancy engineering.

A lot like WONDER BREAD, it is impossible to duplicate at home.

That being said:
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.


! ! ! SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL CRAFT BREWERY ! ! !

.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
..


/that is all
 
2006-05-02 7:21:04 AM  
Brew it yourself. It's not difficult. My home brew is better than any off the shelf beer. ( but some local brew masters have me beat.)

See for yourself:

www.mrbeer.com
 
2006-05-02 7:23:17 AM  
Teutonic_Knight

Just to let you in on something:
Coors Light- 550 Ingredients
Miller Lite- 900 Ingredients
Bud Light- 1600 Ingredients



Where did you get these figures?
 
2006-05-02 7:24:25 AM  
madcharlie: In a desperate situation you can drink your own urine 2-3 times before it becomes toxic.

Much like Miller Lite.
 
2006-05-02 7:26:49 AM  
I don't drink beer. Tastes like piss smells, awful.
 
2006-05-02 7:38:10 AM  
Hmmm ... lets see how good I am.

Off the top of my head:

Betaglucanase ~ sugar conversion (originating from fungi, I think)
Ammonia caramel ~ coloring
Rhoiso-alpha acids ~ hop bitterness
Sulphur dioxide ~ fermentation interruption
Protease ~ protein breakdown
Amyloglucosidase ~ sugar conversion (most likely a bacterial origin)
Propylene glycol alginate ~ hmmm ... for thickness or head retention?
Silicone ~ clarifier

/ chemical biologist, bioorganic chemist, homebrewer, all-around beer geek
 
2006-05-02 7:45:56 AM  
The beer I drink is pretty pure. I make it myself. Lessee... malted barley, hops, yeast, water which has been filtered to remove the chlorine etc. A pinch of Irish moss. That's about it.
 
2006-05-02 7:48:45 AM  
As I homebrewer, I'd be interested in getting my hands on some beta-glucanse (beta-glycosidase; cellulase).

These breakdown the unfermentable cellulose left behind by the grain used for beer.

I'd be interested in how kick-ass I can make a barleywine with all that extra available sugar (though it might taste horrible; bring with it all the extra tannins found in grain husks).
 
2006-05-02 7:52:10 AM  
Most cheap or mass produced US beers give me a massive headache, stomach ache and taste like chemicals to me.
Most decent homebrew, microbrews or german beers I don't have a problem with.

Offering me an MGD, might as well be offering me a bottle of window cleaner - blech.

Knew a couple of home brewers that started adding all sorts of non natural additives to make brewing their beer easier. It ruined their previously good beer recipes and made more than a few people sick.

/Make mead at home. Honey,water,yeast. Easy, no hangover.
 
2006-05-02 7:52:49 AM  
AesopRock_00, good ole flopp

Yeah Newcastle Brown is pretty well known for having plenty of nasty chemicals in it. I'm sure its not just local rumours.

Is it a mass produced beer? Yep.
Have they ever made claims in adverts about purity? Nope. (and even Bud does that.)
Does every bottle/pint have exactly the same sweet taste and Coca-cola-like look? Yep.
Does it give you a shiatty hangover? Definately.

Not that I don't have one myself occasionally, but it's far from a Real Ale.
 
2006-05-02 8:29:20 AM  
How deep is your love?
 
2006-05-02 8:30:42 AM  
HOLY CRAP GRAVITY'S BROKEN

[image from newsimg.bbc.co.uk too old to be available]
 
2006-05-02 8:31:28 AM  
Although both are safe food additives, they hardly sound tempting, and beer drinkers would most likely wish to avoid them.

So, the premise of the article is if something uses a scientific name, you should avoid it. Must have been a slow news day and they were scraping for something to publish.
 
2006-05-02 8:33:32 AM  
[image from dvorak.org too old to be available]
 
2006-05-02 8:36:22 AM  
Right now, I'm in Japan, and I just finished drinking some beer I've never heard of that was about 100 yen a can (way cheap here) with a faux-German name.

I'm guessing it's not particularly pure.
 
2006-05-02 8:39:26 AM  
Seeing as how I live in Stuttgart, and it's Fruhlingsfest time... those three liters of beer were pretty damn pure.

I know, I'm a lightweight. But that was three liters in two-and-a-half hours!! ...and I had to work the next day!
 
2006-05-02 8:43:02 AM  
JohnGaltDiscGolfer: I live 2 miles from Bell's. Life is wonderful!

Bell's Two Hearted Ale......Now that's good beer!
 
2006-05-02 8:43:20 AM  
Fruhlingsfest link, sorry I have no html skilz

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stuttgarter_Fr%C3%BChlingsfest
 
2006-05-02 8:44:31 AM  
I live in Taiwan and I quit drinking any local or chinese beer because the hangovers were really nasty. I think that they hadn't quite figured out what chemicals not to add to beer yet, but in China I think the water that they use has so many chemicals in it, they don't need to add any.
 
2006-05-02 8:45:17 AM  
Teutonic_Knight: Coors Light- 550 Ingredients
Miller Lite- 900 Ingredients
Bud Light- 1600 Ingredients


You know, I may be the biggest hater of bidmillercoors but this is plain BS
 
2006-05-02 8:48:14 AM  
juliaemma: www.mrbeer.com

Mr. Beer is junk

www.beermanmicrobrewery.com
 
2006-05-02 8:49:36 AM  
ImJustaTroll: I don't drink beer. Tastes like piss smells, awful.

Man. You must have had a lot of time on your hands to be able to taste test all the beers in the world

...
 
2006-05-02 8:58:07 AM  
HeartlessLibertarian: Almost like brown water mixed with saliva.

There you go, bringing politics into it.

Sir, pay no attention to the people who say the glass is half empty, because 32% means it's 2/3 empty. There's still some liquid in that glass is my point, but I wouldn't drink it. The last third is usually backwash.
 
2006-05-02 8:58:52 AM  
Dammit people...the real danger in beer production is the use of Dihydrogen Monoxide(pops). That stuff should be banned.
 
2006-05-02 8:59:52 AM  
DAMMIT!! now you've got me thirsty for a beer.....
and it's only 9:00 a.m.

/don't have a drinking problem
//it's got me
 
2006-05-02 9:07:10 AM  
Heineken? Fark that shiate! Pabst Blue Ribbon!

DRTFA
 
2006-05-02 9:07:35 AM  
I'd be interested in how kick-ass I can make a barleywine with all that extra available sugar (though it might taste horrible; bring with it all the extra tannins found in grain husks).

Would be thin, watery, no body. Just add more base malt.
 
2006-05-02 9:11:32 AM  
Article probably written by a Brit with OCD and hypochondriasis. You think this is bad, ask Bud/Miller/Coors what they put in their beers.

Gimme a craft beer anyday over some lite lager crap thats loaded with corn and/or rice syrup and isomerized hop extracts.
 
2006-05-02 9:13:47 AM  
[image from beermonthclub.com too old to be available]
The best german-style wheat beer you'll ever have.
 
2006-05-02 9:33:53 AM  
[image from img147.imageshack.us too old to be available]
best beer in the world
/support your local brewery
 
2006-05-02 9:39:00 AM  
All my fave brews come from the British Isles. I've a favorite from England, Scotland and Ireland, but I'm clueless when it comes to Welsh beers. Can anyone advise?
 
2006-05-02 9:43:42 AM  
rocinante721 and South Carolina BigFish:

I work for a beer dist and we get figures like these all the times. This is why we store beer in different temps. Coors has to be stored in coolers, at under 60 degrees.

Trust me, those macro beers have a ton of stuff in them, so many additives and such.
 
2006-05-02 9:48:33 AM  
For a generally safe, brew I drink all the time (as opposed to the the fancier micro-brews and imports)

[image from yuengling.com too old to be available]

/ Yuengling is German meaning 'Young Man'. It is pronounced "Ying-Ling'.

//those coors and anheiser pissbreaks do nothing but cause headaches, and I'm talking even after 8oz...nasty crap they put in those brews!
 
2006-05-02 10:09:38 AM  
German sportshakes rock!

Bitte ein Bit
 
2006-05-02 10:15:25 AM  
Another vote for the hotty totty toward the bottom of the article. I'd let her drink me under the table anyday.
 
2006-05-02 10:16:40 AM  
quiefNpea- Our dist center is in a working contract to carry Yuengling. I hope it goes through! One of the best beers I have ever had.
 
2006-05-02 10:17:19 AM  
drink more craft beer.
 
2006-05-02 10:18:42 AM  
Teutonic_Knight
"Trust me, those macro beers have a ton of stuff in them, so many additives and such."

Trust me, you don't have a clue.
I have made beer in my home from the day Jimmy Carter legalized it.
I have owned two home brew stores
I have owned two beer stores where I sold beer to the public.
I have brewed beer with 3 different professional brewers here in Charleston SC (Palmetto, T-bones and South end brewery) and the beers consist of malt, barley, hops and yeast. One brewery use Irish moss (seaweed)
Where do you get your data? Working for a dist gives you know insight into whats in it.

As far as the Coors thing goes, Its all marketing. keeping Coors cold is nice, BUT did you ever see it warm on the self in a store(yes its done almost everywhere)without any ill effect to the beer. Besides, if they added so many additives don't you think that would be to make sure the beer had a long shelf life and would NOT go bad. If that where true why would they go to so much trouble to keep it cold? And if it necessary to keep beer cold to keep it from going bad don't you think AB and Miller would do it too? after all, they are 10 times the size of Coors and could do it without blinking if they needed to
(all refers to non keg beer, that's a different ball of wax altogether)
What most people know about beer could fit in a 8 oz nip bottle
 
2006-05-02 10:32:59 AM  
South Carolina Big Fish

Come to www.Brewboard.com. We like your kind there.
 
2006-05-02 10:34:34 AM  
Dihydrogen monoxide is the leading cause of drowning deaths in the U.S. It is very, very scary stuff.
 
2006-05-02 10:36:58 AM  
I live about an hour and a half drive from Belgium, life is definately good.
Only drink witte/weisse beer these days, the fizzy lager efforts make me sick, oh well.
 
2006-05-02 10:39:06 AM  
LaughingGremlin

Dude... no trappist ales?
 
2006-05-02 10:39:07 AM  
I brew my own, and it's pure....
 
2006-05-02 10:40:11 AM  
southcarolinabigfish

sorry to butt in...but it seems like he said "macro" instead of "micro"

but i agree with the rest of your post.
\homebrewer 8+ years
\\likes the irish moss
\\\occasionally uses gypsum b/c of the water
 
2006-05-02 10:42:38 AM  
I like beer. Micro. Macro. Expensive. Cheap. I like it. Sure there are brands I won't touch, but there is no need to be a snob about.

Its beer. I refuse to worry about if its healthy. Its beer. Moderation is the most important thing. That holds true with every food and drink, except for water.
 
2006-05-02 10:43:50 AM  
"Consumers deserve to know what goes into their [alcoholic] drink in the same way as they would any other product," says Camra research and information manager Iain Loe.

"Brewers shouldn't have anything to hide."


I'll drink to that!

Think globally, drink locally. Just picked up a case of Heavy Seas Small Craft Warning last night. Mmmm, Imperial Pilsner... made from water, barley, yeast, and lots and lots of hops.
 
2006-05-02 10:47:16 AM  
By the way, this is the best micro brewed beer in the US;

http://www.dogfish.com/

Their IPA is phenominal.
 
2006-05-02 10:48:16 AM  
quiefNpea, Teutonic_Knight

Yeungling Porter... the best bang for your buck in American dark beers available today.
 
2006-05-02 10:49:25 AM  
Just to remark on the "snob" comments. I wouldn't call myself or anyone else a beer snob because they choose to support the people who take the time and effort to make great beer and strive to give beer a better image, the image AB and other macros have helped destroy. I like the underdog, especially when he is fighting the good fight.
 
2006-05-02 10:50:08 AM  
Although both are safe food additives, they hardly sound tempting, and beer drinkers would most likely wish to avoid them.

And that's where you'd be wrong!


/wait, rhohypnol is all-natural, right?
//I can't remember
 
2006-05-02 10:51:28 AM  
platypusjones: sorry to butt in...but it seems like he said "macro" instead of "micro"

Your right, my bad....But I still can't buy that. As much as I hate AB products, I just can not believe they put tons of crap in what they call beer. AB is so strict in its brewing process and ingredients that its no wonder they are number one (that and marketing) I lived in STL for years and drank enough Bud to float the battleship Missouri. I have been on the tour at AB so many times they knew me by my first name (Not kidding) and the pains they go to to make the best product they can using the best ingredients they can is amazing.
Now if you want to talk about how they use/change/mutate yeast, that's a different matter.
 
2006-05-02 10:54:44 AM  
wyckedsmile: Their IPA is phenominal.

The 60 min IPA rocks. The first time I met my wife she was handing me a 60 min IPA. She smiled and said, "here, try this"
She had me at "here"


good beer!
 
2006-05-02 10:56:14 AM  
Johnnycache's guide to Texas beers

As a Texan, Shiner Bock is fair, Shiner Premium was really good for a cheap session beer but didn't sell well outside of the immediate area surrounding the brewery, albeit it was never marketed like Shiner Bock was, Shiner Blonde is fair, Shiner Hefe is likely my least favorite hefeweissen but drinkable.

For what it's worth, back before they killed the premium, that's what most people that lived around the brewery and or worked there drank. My sister was engaged to one of those people at the time. Bock is so so in colder months and it's hellaciously syrupy on a hot summer day.

Live Oak Brewery does the best job of Texas brewers of any size but it's only available in keg form because they don't care to hassle with bottling. No, I don't work for them but I drink alot of their products when available/convenient.

Saint Arnold Brewing Comany is likely second place in Texas brewers. You can buy bottles at the store.

Great Grains Brewing Company was maybe third place and available in bottles but they went out of business. They made the Balcones Fault and Yellow Rose series of forgettable beers.

Celis was quite good belgian styles but then they sold out to Northern people who A: did detrimental things to the beers, and B: no longer a texas beer. Celis himself moved back to Belgium and is making quite good beers over there again.

Austin Brew Pubs, because that's where I live.....near anyway

Lovejoy's Tap Room in Austin makes some fine beers and has an enormous collection of beers on tap from everywhere, the one commonality is they don't have anything that sucks. Funny thing to watch once: Guy came in to order a miller lite, was told they didn't sell that, then tried for miller, bud light, budweiser. Same response. "What kind of bar doesn't have any of those beers? This place sucks!" "Umm, a bar designed for people that care about beers?" he stormed off. It was very funny.

Coppertank caters to a young moron beer crowd and their beers are reflective of that. Often if you ask for something they brewed the waitresses aren't even aware that it exists because it's mostly a light/lite beer kinda crowd that comes out to be young and drunk not savor beers.

The Draught House truly cares about their beers and crafts many fine beers of their own, some regulars and some seasonal like Lovejoy's. Stuffier more yuppy atmosphere than Lovejoy's however. More medical assistants and lawyers and less free-press writers and musician/theater types. Much lower percentage of hot young hipster girls.

Lone Star and Pearl are what they are, macrobrews that are tolerable if that's all you have/can afford. I tend to go for Modelo Especial in those circumstances. Lawn mowing, busllshiatting with non-beer people kinda beers.

Happy Drinking
 
2006-05-02 10:57:22 AM  
bkennedy
Trappist ales occasionally. Generally too strong for me, I have a dodgy stomach, tragically. Used to drink up a storm until the last year or so.
I like westmalle dubbel, and Duvel and La Chouffe occasionally. i am particularly forn of Leffe blond, for whatever reason, that and Rodenbach.
 
2006-05-02 10:57:50 AM  
Beer is good for you:
http://content.boredmuch.com/babe/06274236.jpg
 
2006-05-02 10:58:59 AM  
wyckedsmile

By the way, this is the best micro brewed beer in the US;

http://www.dogfish.com/

Their IPA is phenominal.


I love their 60 and their 90, but I'm on the fence with the 120; I just picked up six and at first sip I said "Dang! Its too hot! Too much alcohol!" Which is weird, becuase I'm a fan of their World Wide Stout (only 18% abv, while the 120 is 20% abv) and I think they craft enough flavour around it to make the alcohol palatable. Another bottle on another day, and while drinking it very cold, I found it drinkable.

YMMV.


/I hear the 120 when "Randalized" is TEH JAM.
//Last time I went, Randal was "on vacation" (a tube was broken) :(
 
2006-05-02 11:00:50 AM  
bkennedy: Come to www.Brewboard.com. We like your kind there.

That reminds me. I am on a BBQ team and we have been asked to come back to Memphis in May this year. Last year all we had to drink was Bud lite. I had a head ache for all 7 days.
This year I promised to never let that happen again. I have been a brewing fool. I have a cream ale and a honey blond ale that are in the secondary ready to go into the kegs and a pale ale and a red ale ready to go into the secondary. 20 gallons of home brew is going to M in M this year for 4 of us to drink...Life is good
 
2006-05-02 11:05:00 AM  
The main annoying additive in american lagers is rice. Just get a good ipa or other ale, porter that's made with nothing but malted barley & hops. No adjuncts, much better flavor.

Anchor Steam = my favorite beer for the last 15 years. I went to a party where we did a blind taste test of 30-odd ales and lagers and picked it out as my clear favorite. There are a couple close seconds in my book.
 
2006-05-02 11:05:38 AM  
What's interesting is that Canadian beer labelling regulations allow a beer (e.g. Molson's Canadian) to say it is "preservative free", while still containing over 100 additives. Also, it tastes like piss (as does Blue, Export, Bud...)

Fortunately, there are four really great small breweries where I live. One of whom (Phillips Brewing) makes a double-IPA that'll knock yer socks off.
 
2006-05-02 11:06:58 AM  
mekkab: I'm on the fence with the 120


I'm with you on this one. Its just to over the top. To me it was to "sweet" if there is such a thing with an IPA. I'll stick with the 60 and the 90 thankyouverymuch ;-)
 
2006-05-02 11:08:23 AM  
South Carolina BigFish

Sweet... And hoppy I'd imagine.
 
2006-05-02 11:11:51 AM  
South Carolina BigFish

I'm with you on this one. Its just to over the top. To me it was to "sweet" if there is such a thing with an IPA.


Actually, even the 90 is a bit on the "sweet" side, despite having that tangible bitterness that I require(!) with an IPA... but the Dogfish Style is very rich and sweet.
they've kinda ruined my immature palate. I used to enjoy Saranac beer... now I can hardly drink it for lack of flavor!
 
2006-05-02 11:12:26 AM  
South Carolina BigFish - "AB is so strict in its brewing process and ingredients that its no wonder they are number one (that and marketing)"

I agree with this statement but must say it's really only their marketing that keeps them in business. The reason they are so strict in their brew process is because they have to be, brewing such large quantities of beer, if you contaminate it or otherwise mess it up you loose a super large quantity of beer. I think their maticulous brewing process is out of neccessity not really their care and love of the beer.

All this american macro beer is dumbed down so much that it no longer has taste. They obviously do this to appeal to more people. I like IPA's and double IPA's as well as Imperial Stouts, not too many Bud drinkers would be down to drink a Stone IPA or Dogfish 90 minute or a Three Floyds Darklord Stout.

These drinkers have it in their mind that this weird lager/pilsner style beer that AB and the like make is what beer is supposed to be. I disagree completely. It's not how beer was first made and beer was never meant to be so dumbed down.
 
2006-05-02 11:14:45 AM  
Add 1 to the homebrew crew... and if you buy mail-order homebrew kits, then there's a chance that I came up with the recipe of your brew.

So basically, I'm God, and you're drunk becuase of my supreme powers. Bow to me, or send me beer, or money.
 
2006-05-02 11:15:00 AM  
I don't even think I could give a review for the 120 minute. It's not even really like a beer to me. I agree with the too "sweet" thing though. I would imagine it comes from the tremenous malt backbone required to brew this beer with so much hops. The 90 minute tends to be on the sweet side for me as well, I don't ever drink more than 2 of those in an evening b/c it gets a bit sweet.
 
2006-05-02 11:16:11 AM  
Timbits73: containing over 100 additives

Where can I see these additives listed?
Where do you get your data?

Folks, The thing about beer is this. You need 4 things. yeast, hops, barley and water. Some misguided breweries add corn and rice. THATS IT. you don't need to add anything to make a better product, or a more stable product or a cleaner product and on and on. so why would they. It cost MONEY to add things to beer, and if they don't need to why would they. Shelf life you say? NOT SO. with pasteurization shelf life is good, and besides, they self govern on this with a "born on date" AB will walk into a bar, and if they find one beer out of date, they will replace ALL of it on the spot.

If someone can show me a real list of "crap" the big three adds to is beers, I'll shut up and go away. Really.
 
2006-05-02 11:17:15 AM  
Did someone mention German beer?

[image from img481.imageshack.us too old to be available]

All German beers in this thread are now rendered irrelevant.
 
2006-05-02 11:17:25 AM  
Lactose sucks ass.
 
2006-05-02 11:17:51 AM  
Animatronik

Corn is also a major adjunct in American light lagers.

/ever wonder why "adjunct" sounds so much like "add junk"?
 
2006-05-02 11:20:19 AM  
FWIW: my best 5 breweries in the US (in terms of individual products as well as complete lines)

1. dogfishhead
2. rogue
3. stone
4. boulder (try the mojo)
5. southern tier
 
2006-05-02 11:20:37 AM  
South Carolina Bigfish

I am intrigued by your ideas and wish to subscribe to your newsletter.
 
2006-05-02 11:21:18 AM  
zymurgist

"ever wonder why "adjunct" sounds so much like "add junk"?"

I hope you've never had an oatmeal stout, or a Belgian Trappist Ale.

:-P
Hehe
 
2006-05-02 11:21:26 AM  
2006-05-02 11:12:26 AM tattooedtolley

These drinkers have it in their mind that this weird lager/pilsner style beer that AB and the like make is what beer is supposed to be. I disagree completely. It's not how beer was first made and beer was never meant to be so dumbed down.

"I will make it felony to drink small beer"
-Shakespeare, Henry IV
 
2006-05-02 11:23:09 AM  
bkennedy

Not fair!

How about differentiating between adding grains for taste or body, and adding grains because corn is cheaper than barley?
 
2006-05-02 11:23:33 AM  
tattooedtolley: All this american macro beer is dumbed down so much that it no longer has taste.

I always wondered why AB doesn't dig way back in its history and really make the beer they made in 1860 and see if it would sell. Some of the best home brewed beers I have made/drank were classic American Pilsners with a good hop bitterness balanced with sweet corn. Its great beer and all the old times love the stuff.
 
2006-05-02 11:24:10 AM  
awesome quote - zymurgist
 
2006-05-02 11:24:47 AM  
zymurgist: Corn is also a major adjunct in American light lagers.

That would be rice.....
 
2006-05-02 11:25:47 AM  
South Carolina BigFish: I always wondered why AB doesn't dig way back in its history and really make the beer they made in 1860 and see if it would sell. Some of the best home brewed beers I have made/drank were classic American Pilsners with a good hop bitterness balanced with sweet corn. Its great beer and all the old times love the stuff.

Full Sail makes 'Session Premium Lager' which is supposed to be in the pre-prohabition style. It's great, very light flavor, mild hop bitterness, and a sweetness to it that goes great.

It's not the most complex beer out there, but if you're just looking to 'drink beer', it's amazing.
 
2006-05-02 11:26:22 AM  
tattooedtolley: okay, we've got a three-way agreement. The 120 is good only as a conversation piece.

/well, we're talking about it! ;)
 
2006-05-02 11:27:49 AM  
No beer thread would be complete without:
[image from unibroue.com too old to be available]
 
2006-05-02 11:29:37 AM  
AB is working on releasing some "craft" brews as we speak. They have had some tastings and they have come up with an IPA, Iperial Pils, and a Brown Ale.

Here's an article on it from Beer Advocate. http://beeradvocate.com/news/stories_read/f-718480

While interesting, AB could pose a serious threat to the small craft brewers we all love. I have mixed feelings on it.
 
2006-05-02 11:30:21 AM  
South Carolina BigFishiathink Bud light is mostly rice, but I think Miller Lite has a bit of corn in there.
 
2006-05-02 11:30:53 AM  
2006-05-02 11:23:33 AM South Carolina BigFish
I always wondered why AB doesn't dig way back in its history and really make the beer they made in 1860 and see if it would sell.


i might be making this up, but i swear i thoguht i saw a commercial recently from one of the majors (miller, AB, etc.) promoting a limited release of a beer brewed with the original recipe. can anyone confirm this, or should i go back into my dark space?
 
2006-05-02 11:31:38 AM  
adenosine: Full Sail makes 'Session Premium Lager'

Here's a great article about this style of beer

http://www.brewingtechniques.com/library/backissues/issue3.5/renner.ht​ml
 
2006-05-02 11:32:43 AM  
tattooedtolley: AB is working on releasing some "craft" brews as we speak. They have had some tastings and they have come up with an IPA, Iperial Pils, and a Brown Ale.

Here's an article on it from Beer Advocate. http://beeradvocate.com/news/stories_read/f-718480

While interesting, AB could pose a serious threat to the small craft brewers we all love. I have mixed feelings on it.


Honestly, I'll give them a try if they come to my area, but I look at it this way: anybody who loves good beer, will not be happy drinking the same beer over and over again. Even if they start with AB's craft lineup, they will go out to other local and smaller breweries.

Also, it will help you at smaller bars with a poor selection. I was at a scummy bar in the worst part of town this weekend (they had OE 800 advertisements on the wall!), but they had Blue Moon, because it's a Coor's product. Had I actually been drinking there, that would have saved me from an awful fate of tasteless american lagers.
 
2006-05-02 11:33:47 AM  
platypusjones: beer brewed with the original recipe

Its was Miller and its not the same as they brewed in 1860. I saw it and tripped over myself to try it, dud....

read the Brewing Techniques article I posed above. Its good stuff
 
2006-05-02 11:34:04 AM  
mekkab - I agree, it's an interesting beer to try and attempt to decypher but my god its a huge one and very off balanced, of course if you cellar it for a few years it would most likely mellow out a bit and might be very good.

I think if I ever buy it again I will cellar a few bottles, let one go for a year and try it and let the others continue until I open one that tastes better.

Now that I have a temp controller on my beer fridge, I can cellar stuff much easier.
 
2006-05-02 11:39:52 AM  
adenosine - "Honestly, I'll give them a try if they come to my area, but I look at it this way: anybody who loves good beer, will not be happy drinking the same beer over and over again. Even if they start with AB's craft lineup, they will go out to other local and smaller breweries."

I agree, people who will try these beers from AB as their first craft brew experience will undoubtedly go out and try other brews. I just hope that it all turns out like you say, people will be turned onto craft brew b/c of it and broaden their palates and purchases. I don't think AB needs to make this move, but I know they are scared as the american beer industry is suffering on the macro front while craft brew is soaring higher than ever.
 
2006-05-02 11:40:44 AM  
Whoops, messed up my bold tags.
 
2006-05-02 11:43:15 AM  
South Carolina BigFish

Rice, yes, in Budweiser. What about Miller, Coors, etc.?
 
2006-05-02 11:48:15 AM  
2006-05-02 11:25:47 AM adenosine

Full Sail makes 'Session Premium Lager' which is supposed to be in the pre-prohabition style. It's great, very light flavor, mild hop bitterness, and a sweetness to it that goes great.

Sounds very much like Clipper City's
 
2006-05-02 11:50:01 AM  
Try this again, this time with preview...

Sounds very much like Clipper City's McHenry beer.

McHenry

Old Baltimore Style Beer
All malt - Approx. 4.5% ABV
Hersbrucker Hops
Prior to prohibition virtually all American beers were made from 100% malted barley. This gave the beers a richer, fuller taste than you see today when most beers are made using a high percentage of corn or rice. We researched old brewing archives, and patterned this beer after one that was produced in Baltimore in the early 1940's. We named it after one of the great symbols of our area, Fort McHenry, birthplace of our national anthem. Selected Baltimore's Best Local Beer - City Paper, Oct. 2001.
 
2006-05-02 11:51:27 AM  
adenosine

Love those Unibroue beers. La Fin du Monde is always welcome in my glass.
 
2006-05-02 11:56:36 AM  
Good question. I would say rice. and I;ll tell you why. First. That's what they say they have in them if you really dig deep. Second, that's what the leader of the pack, AB uses and its pretty much follow the leader these days. Rice is cheaper. Rice has much less taste than corn and god know there is no taste in budmillercoors. And last but not least. One day I was in my home brew store and a man in a 500 dollar suit walked in. He was WAY out of place, but he came up and tried to sell me advertising on a local radio station. when he stuck his hand out I saw the biggest AB ring on his finger I have ever seen in my life. That's what I wanted to talk about, not the air time he wanted to sell me and once I got that though his head, we talked about AB. Seems he was a million dollar man, retired from AB and was selling radio time because he was board with retirement in SC. Anyhoo. i gave him a beer or 10 and we talked and talked. At that time I was under the impression that Busch beer was made with corn and bud/light was made with rice. He told me that all AB beers and all its competitor were made with rice, and I believed him. great man. knew a ton about the mega beers.
 
2006-05-02 11:58:43 AM  
Reinheitsgebot forever! Chemicals and cheap sugars in my beer, Never!
 
2006-05-02 12:00:55 PM  
Pure enough..... BRILLIANT!!
 
2006-05-02 12:01:25 PM  
I may have to shut up and leave as I stated i would above. Seems my digging has turned up some crap miller may put in its lite beer. Something along the lines of a heading agent. I still can't find anything on AB adding crap to its beer.
 
2006-05-02 12:03:01 PM  
Mmmmm

[image from blog.dortoh.ca too old to be available]
 
2006-05-02 12:12:18 PM  
ZoSo_the_Crowe

Oooh, Love the celebrator.

Beer I haven't seen in the states I really enjoyed while in Germany:
[image from oclasses.com too old to be available]
 
2006-05-02 12:12:57 PM  
[image from image.www.rakuten.co.jp too old to be available]

Suck it
[image from media.gamerfeed.com too old to be available]
 
2006-05-02 12:13:02 PM  
Drink your local craft beers... Shiner Summerstock was probably the best beer of the line, now it's Shiner Kolsch and I can't seem to find it locally anymore? Anyway, they're owned by Gambrinus now. It's my understanding that Shiner Bock is made entirely from extracts - malt extract, liquid hop extract, and a lot of corn sugar extract, which imparts a distinctively 'corny' taste to the beer. It'll do in a pinch as a cheap, drinkin' beer and I prefer it to Bud, Coors, and the rest of the corp megaswill. Shiner Lite is about the only light beer I can stomach.

St. Arnolds is a great local craft brewer you can get throughout Texas... the Amber is good, the Elissa is a great IPA, the Lawnmower and Summer Pils are both good summer drinkin' beers.

Real Ale in Blanco cranks out some good stuff. Live Oak does too - compare their Big Bark to Shiner. I dig on the Fredricksburg Brewery, but think maybe they only sell at the microbrewery?

The TABC keeps too much good beer out of Texas. The Pacific Northwest definitely has the best assortment of craft brews, hell, the whole west coast... then in the East, Dogfish Head, Victory, some good things happening there too...

Damn, why can't I drink at work?
 
2006-05-02 12:15:36 PM  
http://www.halftimebeverage.com/
 
2006-05-02 12:19:14 PM  
For those of us working in the brewing industry, stories like this are such old news. Most of the beer people commonly drink is artificially adapted to the profit generation process with no concern for the product's quality at all. A major brewer that I worked for in Canada recently changed its malt to a cheaper version to save a few cents per bushel and when the beer didn't come out right they just dosed it with chemicals to bring it back in line. I would love to say this was some obscure microbrewery doing this crap, but it wasn't - it was a major, major producer in both the Canadian and international market.

If you do your research, you will want to drink unpasteurized beer from a local brewery - if that option is available to you. Making this choice not only supports local business and workers, it keeps money out of the hands of international greed pigs who just want to play global beer monopoly.

Your local unpasteurized micro-brew is far, far better beer than the crap you are buying from commercials. Research clearly indicates that people buy all alcohol with their eyes rather than their taste buds. I argued against that until I went to a blind whiskey tasting and found out I actually hate the single-malt scotches I thought I had liked and instead became a full-time bourbon drinker.
 
2006-05-02 12:20:36 PM  
That article was bunk
 
2006-05-02 12:21:13 PM  
When I used to run a grad student pub, one of the microbrew beer companies we bought directly from brought in the standard ingredients form the industry made up for its membership to submit to the state. The idea was, have a comprehensive list of all possible ingredients, and the individual brewery just checks off the applicable.

There were some surprising entries on the list. Wood pulp, things like that.

But the most surprising was the inclusion of urea.

I looked at the company rep. "Urea?"
"Yep. Urea. Imagine that."

Before then, I thought "pisswater" was a joke.
 
2006-05-02 12:24:08 PM  
Robobagpiper: But the most surprising was the inclusion of urea.

I looked at the company rep. "Urea?"
"Yep. Urea. Imagine that."

Before then, I thought "pisswater" was a joke.


Not suprising at all. This is actually used as a yeast nutrient. Healthy, happy yeast = tastey beer.
 
2006-05-02 12:27:19 PM  
Add me to the list of homebrewers in the thread...

As far as urea, you can use it to denature proteins, but only at really high concentrations, and there are other agents they use to precipitate suspended proteins out of the beer... maybe it's thrown in to provide a fixed nitrogen source for the yeast? Whack.

Just read on Wikipedia that it can be used as a browning agent on pretzels or as a cig "flavor enhancer" so maybe it affects color or flavor... still whack.
 
2006-05-02 12:28:02 PM  
I was in Texas for a while. Shiner is not good.

Said grad student bar I ran for a year, at one point in the past (or so I'm told) sold the majority of Shiner Bock sold in kegs. Back when Shiner was a microbrew, that is.

There were consistency issues with the batches in those days, but overall, the Shiner was highly regarded.

Something happened when they were bought out a big brewing company, I was told. It just wasn't the same after.

jcache, ever try anything from the Brenham brewery? Good stuff, before they shut down.
 
2006-05-02 12:29:15 PM  
adenosine
[Urea]
Not suprising at all. This is actually used as a yeast nutrient.


Okay, that makes sense.

It's still pretty funny to think about.
 
2006-05-02 12:29:31 PM  
Heh... thanks adenosine... beat me to it :)
 
2006-05-02 12:31:17 PM  
South Carolina BigFish: At that time I was under the impression that Busch beer was made with corn and bud/light was made with rice. He told me that all AB beers and all its competitor were made with rice, and I believed him. great man. knew a ton about the mega beers.

I've seen a billboard within the past year here in Illinois that proclaimed that Busch is proudly brewed from Illinois corn. Damn near drove off the road from the shuddering that caused.

/haven't touched a Busch in years
//still made me shudder
 
2006-05-02 12:37:09 PM  
hargoni it was a major, major producer in both the Canadian and international market.


Kokanee?!?!?!

/jk ;)
//much love for B.C. IPAs
///and that "Backhand of god" stout
 
2006-05-02 12:39:55 PM  
For my fellow southerners lemme hear ya say Hell Yes for Sweetwater Brewing Co.!

Try their new imperial stout: Happy Ending

//Mmmm 420, Sweet Georgia Brown, Blue, IPA, Exodus Porter
///Sweetwater is the best brewery tour ever. EVER. Soooo much free beer.
 
2006-05-02 12:47:01 PM  
rocinante721

As I homebrewer, I'd be interested in getting my hands on some beta-glucanse (beta-glycosidase; cellulase).

These breakdown the unfermentable cellulose left behind by the grain used for beer.


Beta-glucanase doesn't break down cellulose (of which there is little to none in beer). It breaks down (get this) beta-glucans! Beta-glucans are complex carbohydrates found in malt that have a tendency to form a gel in situations of high-sheer and sudden cooling. This can pose a problem for brewers during the lautering stage (separating the wort from the spent grains).

While there are enzymes in malt that can break down beta-glucans, they are very temperature sensitive and easy to inactivate too early. Some brewers use what are called "exogenous enzymes" or enzymes from and outside source, usually fungal, sometimes bacterial, and are usually more insensitive to higher temperatures.


I'd be interested in how kick-ass I can make a barleywine with all that extra available sugar (though it might taste horrible; bring with it all the extra tannins found in grain husks).

Wouldn't taste horrible, as the extraction of tannins from the husk have nothing to do with breaking down the extra carbohydrates (also called beta-limit dextrins). You start extracting too many tannins when you are mashing for too long and at too high of a temperature. In fact, using these enzymes will actually speed up the mashing process (unless you are making a lite beer and want NO leftover carb's).

/master's degree in brewing.
//quality control lab employee at regional craft brewer.
 
2006-05-02 12:47:41 PM  
As much as I tend to disagree with some of the comments in the other threads, it's nice to see that a metric assload (love that phrase in the other headline) of Farkers know their beer.

www.beeradvocate.com

Penn Weizen and Celebrator Dopplebock ftw

Westy 12~game over, man. Game over.
 
2006-05-02 12:51:26 PM  
Oh, and if you're ever near Pittsburgh, do yourself a favor and make a visit to our local John Harvards.

Andy the brewer is a genius, and his fruit beers are beyond compare.

Church is good too, and D's, and Fatheads,

/loves a good craft beer
//lucky enough to live in Pennsylvania, home of some outstanding breweries
 
sp
2006-05-02 12:55:14 PM  
I have a number of factors I use to determine the beer I drink on a particular night. The main factor is how many I plan to drink.

Beer doesn't age well, so by the time most imports reach your lips, they aren't in primo condition.
 
2006-05-02 1:07:45 PM  
ian.m

Beta-glucanase doesn't break down cellulose (of which there is little to none in beer).


I figured an different English-American definition of the enzyme function (I'm a biochemist, enzymologist).

I am talking about using a fungal cellulase to break down the cellulose in the mash (plenty of that!), not what is in the wort already.

As the solid grist breaks down into fermentable sugars, I expect leaching of all the tannins, etc. into the mash, wouldn't I ?


/master's degree in brewing.
//quality control lab employee at regional craft brewer.



You profile says Redhook, so you got A-B for a pimp.

Perhaps you can explain to me why after A-B bought into RH, they were available everywhere in NYC, but now, it is rare to find a RH on tap.

Bait & switch by the A-B distibutors?

Is that New Hampshire brewery still up & running at capacity?
 
2006-05-02 1:16:36 PM  
ProtestWarrior

If you ever get to Harrisburg, you've got to try the Appalachian Brewing Company on Cameron St. They have a smaller location in Gettysburg, too, with all of the same great beers.

/not from Pa. but heartily endorses the ABC
 
2006-05-02 1:20:12 PM  
[image from web.dailycamera.com too old to be available]

/Enjoy.
 
2006-05-02 1:20:33 PM  
I figured an different English-American definition of the enzyme function (I'm a biochemist, enzymologist).

I am talking about using a fungal cellulase to break down the cellulose in the mash (plenty of that!), not what is in the wort already.


Ahh, so you're calling it cellulose because it makes up part of the cell walls, not because its actually "cellulose."


As the solid grist breaks down into fermentable sugars, I expect leaching of all the tannins, etc. into the mash, wouldn't I ?


No more so than any regular brew. Again, its time and temp that govern the amount of tannins that are leeched from the grain. Go too long and/or too hot and you'll start getting that harsh tannin bitterness and astringency.


Bait & switch by the A-B distibutors?

Is that New Hampshire brewery still up & running at capacity?


Dunno about the distribution. I don't think Portsmouth is running at capacity. As I recall they have the same system we do here in Seattle, but they aren't cranking out as much product as we are.
 
2006-05-02 1:21:56 PM  
2006-05-02 11:56:36 AM South Carolina BigFish

Rice has much less taste than corn

I'd rather have a Bud than a Miller if I'm in a place where I can't get anything tastier (think of the Redskins or Ravens games). (That's why I like baseball... local craft brews on tap at Camden Yards!)

I believe that Yeungling uses corn, but their Porter and Black & Tan beers are dark and hearty enough that most people will never notice it.
 
Noc
2006-05-02 1:23:04 PM  
mmmmmmmm propylene glycol alginate...
 
2006-05-02 1:24:47 PM  
saw a good quote the other day.

"Life begins at 60.. 1.060 that is."
 
2006-05-02 1:25:33 PM  
2006-05-02 12:55:14 PM sp

Beer doesn't age well, so by the time most imports reach your lips, they aren't in primo condition.

I agree... that's why when I drink imports, they tend to be bottle conditioned like Lindeman's Framboise.
[image from merchantduvin.com too old to be available]
 
2006-05-02 1:26:38 PM  
If anyone has a picture, I'd love to see the label from Maggie's Dog Slobber... apparently a hit in Washington and Idaho.
 
2006-05-02 1:26:59 PM  
I am a huge fan of Theakston's Old Peculier. I'm probably better off not knowing what's in it (besides "Fuggle" hops), though.

The boy and I make our own beer several times a year. Hooray!
 
2006-05-02 1:29:26 PM  
No love for the Magic Hat around here?
 
2006-05-02 1:33:35 PM  
Robobagpiper: Brenham was tried Not bad at all but gone. Fred beers are OK but I like Live Oak better.

Most of my current beers come from grain kits from Austin Homebrew Supply. Guilty of owning too many carboys. Lagering fridge is the next step. Been bottling so far but a keg/lagering fridge would be a nice addition to the hobby plus lots less bottle washing and capping, depending on how it goes.
 
2006-05-02 1:34:33 PM  
Hotaine

Much love for Magic Hat Number 9.
 
2006-05-02 1:38:26 PM  
the magic hat HIPA is really good.. my current fav is the Dogfish Head 60,90 and 120 minute IPAs. those guys rock
 
2006-05-02 1:40:04 PM  
ian.m Ahh, so you're calling it cellulose because it makes up part of the cell walls, not because its actually "cellulose."

Cellulose, the beta-glucose polymer in plants which give them structural rigity (husks, wood, cotton, etc), as opposed to the alpha-glucose polymers (starch) that the amylases break down.

Bioengineers are looking at making fungal cellulases for breaking down the bulk of biomass (corn stalks, wood) i/o to make ethanol-based fuel viable.

My thought is why not try it to make a uber-rediculous gravity wort.

... or i could just render it down by boiling longer.

Dunno about the distribution. I don't think Portsmouth is running at capacity. As I recall they have the same system we do here in Seattle, but they aren't cranking out as much product as we are.

A-B is notorious for their marketing savvy (read: backstabbing).

My guess (semi-confirmed by friends in-the-know) is that they bought into RH & Pyramid to satisfy the distributors looking for increasing craft beer availability, so they can say "Hey! We got Redhook! Craft brew for you!"

Then, over time, they just stop pushing the product unless someone asks for it.

Spend more time selling the Bud for larger profit, brand awareness.

Make no mistake ... they'd rather sell Bud than RH, even though their part owners.

All in a plan to cover their bases as Macrobrews are continuing to dwindle as Craftbrew sales are skyrocking.

hence the reason for buying into RH & Pyramid and making stuff like BARE KNUCKLE STOUT & ANHEUSER WORLD SELECT (which was god-awful!!!).

Look out! They could purposely under-sell RH i/o to make it financially unstable, offer a buyout of stock for majority ownership as a 'bailout', shut down the Brewery (the ol' Standard Oil maneuver).

Any fears of this?

/ curious
 
2006-05-02 2:02:41 PM  
Any fears of this?

haven't heard any so far...
 
2006-05-02 2:09:02 PM  
Haven't heard of that, but I have heard that Flying Dog (Colorado) is interested in buying Frederick Brewing (Maryland). Fredrick Brewing is in receivership, having overbuilt their physical plant several years ago. I like their ESB and HopFest (seasonal), but who knows whether they will still be around after the Dog takes over. Oh well, I'd rather have them bought out by a craft brewer than by a megabrewer, for the reasons y'all have been discussing here.
 
2006-05-02 2:31:22 PM  
madcharlie:

"If you are referring to urine, I'm gonna have to disagree. Urine is actually fairly clean. In a desperate situation you can drink your own urine 2-3 times before it becomes toxic."

Or I could just drink my Natural Light in the fridge. :/ Same diff.
 
2006-05-02 3:10:31 PM  
2006-05-02 01:16:36 PM zymurgist
If you ever get to Harrisburg, you've got to try the Appalachian Brewing Company on Cameron St. They have a smaller location in Gettysburg, too, with all of the same great beers


I wholeheartdly agree. i travel to harrisburg quite a bit for work, i pop in there occassionally. great beers all around. (the space is very cool, too. they say it is the "largest craft brewery in teh US", but i have heard others make that claim, too.) the food, surprisingly, isn't that good, tho. pulled pork sandwich was like jerky, and the pizza smelled and tasted like drying feet.
 
2006-05-02 3:12:14 PM  
99.44%. It floats on water, too.

/not very good beer, just pure
 
2006-05-02 3:23:25 PM  
Yuengling Lager and Victory HopDevil is all I need.

/Don't care what's in them
//full of tasty goodness
///I sometimes get Golden Monkeys on my back
////PA Beer rocks (must be all the Germans around here...)
 
2006-05-02 3:29:08 PM  
[image from img305.imageshack.us too old to be available]

3 faves

/haven't met too many beers I don't like actually
//except Blue Moon
 
2006-05-02 3:34:55 PM  
Speaking as one who has been there and drunk that, I can testify firsthand that German beers DO NOT cause the hangovers the way American beers do. Coors in particular makes me so sick I want to die, and I am nbot the first person to experience this reaction

The reason is simple: formaldehyde is ruinously deadly to yeast, and even a few drops will kill a huge vat of fermenting wort; I have seen it clarify in a matter of minutes.

You people who beef about pollution of our air and water ought to invest your time in improving something useful.
 
2006-05-02 3:53:31 PM  
Did someone ask about beer from Wales? Two breweries spring to mind.

Brains - the reason that the English think the Welsh are enthusiastic about education lies in the ancient advertising slogan "It's Brains you need".

Felinfoel - Pronounced "Feeling foul" even by those who know it should really be "velinvoil".

/Need a slash afterwards
//Or two
///Do you find that once you've started you've got to keep going?
 
2006-05-02 3:55:10 PM  
Just bottled my first batch of home-brew (a brown ale done the easy way, with LME and steeped grain) last night. Great to see the thread.

/now here's hoping the bottles don't explode
//Augustinerbraeu Muenchner,
///Leffe Blonde
////Smithwick's
//and Sam'l Smith's Oatmeal Stout FTW!
 
2006-05-02 3:55:36 PM  
2006-05-02 03:23:25 PM chenzo


Yuengling Lager and Victory HopDevil is all I need.

/Don't care what's in them
//full of tasty goodness
///I sometimes get Golden Monkeys on my back
////PA Beer rocks (must be all the Germans around here...)


Hopdevil is excellent (for the hop-lover, obviously). Used to live 2 miles from the brewery and fill up my growler there.
 
2006-05-02 3:58:55 PM  
P.S.:

Beer geeks will know that the Reinheitsgebot specifies water, barley and hops as the ONLY allowable ingredients for beer...

...but that won't make beer, because you need yeast as well. But they didn't know that yeast was involved until three hundred years later. All they knew was that they used the sediment from the last batch to make the next batch.

/the more you know
 
2006-05-02 4:22:08 PM  
[image from realbeer.com too old to be available]
 
2006-05-02 4:31:54 PM  
platypusjones

Ever been to Triumph Brewery in Princeton, NJ? I seem to remember having some good beer and good food there. I don't get over to NJ much, so it has been a while.
 
2006-05-02 4:50:31 PM  
"Psycho Therapist," if you are brewing your beer without a hydrometer, you better invest $10 and buy one.

A hydrometer looks like a thermometer, with a ball of lead shot on the bottom; the farther it sinks, the more alcohol you have, the higher it floats, the more sugar.

I pulled a BIG BAD boo-boo, when I was running a Geordie Bitter British (try to say that three times fast when you've killed a cold six-pack)batch, and running the alcohol up to about 9.3%, which is way too stiff anyway.

I forgot to factor in, alcohol is about 750 g/l in weight, and water is 1000; at 9.3%, my beer would have had a specific gravity of 976.75, but when I bottled it, I corked it at around 1020, instead of the 990 I needed.

KERRRRRRRRRRRRR------------BLOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOEY!

Later on, I also gave away five gallons of over-stout beer, at about 11.2%, and god what a mess: I had people passed out up and down the block, people choppin' up furniture with samurai swords in the front yard, and I was the whole damn weekend pulling cars out of ditches!

Ah, the good old days................
 
2006-05-02 4:51:22 PM  
Thanks, Zoilos!
 
2006-05-02 4:55:06 PM  
If any of you home brewers are interested, you can usually pick up an old discarded fridge in good working order at Starvation Army.

You can unplug it and keep it in the garage, then run a VERY SMALL light bulb for a heat source--it doesn't take much--to keep your vat at a perfect 86 F to hasten fermentation. It also keeps out fruit flies, which are the bane of every brewer; one fly can ruin 20 gallons of good beer, turn it all to vinegar.

Once your batch is fermented to the right level, you can plug it in and chill it down to about 29 F, and draw off the sediment that way. You also want to age your beer at 54 F or so, and a cheap fridge is ideal for that.
 
2006-05-02 4:55:43 PM  
[image from i6.photobucket.com too old to be available]
 
2006-05-02 4:56:35 PM  
2006-05-02 12:55:14 PM sp
Beer doesn't age well, so by the time most imports reach your lips, they aren't in primo condition.


I lol'd.
My beer cellar disagrees most heartily with that.

Anyone got a bottle of Vertical Epic 02.02.02 they'd like to sell me?
 
2006-05-02 5:23:13 PM  
[image from abita.com too old to be available]

Abita Turbodog

recently came across this brew... quite good.
 
2006-05-02 5:35:02 PM  
Ahhh... German beer... delicious...

Also, I am wondering if anyone here has ever tried Bell's Oberon? It is kind of limited to the Michigan area but if you ever run across it try it. Absolutely marvelous.
 
2006-05-02 5:48:06 PM  
olddinosaur: You can unplug it and keep it in the garage, then run a VERY SMALL light bulb for a heat source--it doesn't take much--to keep your vat at a perfect 86 F to hasten fermentation.

Holy esters and phenols, batman!

Do you only brew crazy belgian beers or what?
 
2006-05-02 6:13:48 PM  
Tracer Bullet

Bell's is also sold here in the Pittsburgh area, and Larry is one of my favorite brewers.

Cherry Stout, mmmmm
 
2006-05-02 7:14:47 PM  
Home brewer here too (albeit usually kits).

Still, Mmmmmmmmmm, Dogbolter, eh?
 
2006-05-02 7:21:11 PM  
Gay Deceiver

Theakston's is now back in the hands of the family, so it's probably got a decent bunch of ingredients (not sure about during the S&N days).
 
2006-05-02 9:41:30 PM  
[image from secure5.worldaxxs.net too old to be available]
MMmmm... hennepin.
 
2006-05-02 9:52:44 PM  
adenosine - my thoughts exactly.... 86!??!!

Protest Warrior, I actually might have some VE 02... whats it going for these days? :)
 
2006-05-03 4:50:23 AM  
I drink Stone Brewing Co. (http://www.stonebrew.com)

It's about as pure as it gets.

/It also tastes freaking great too.
 
2006-05-03 12:12:39 PM  
I went to bed drinking Budweiser and woke up with a Moosehead.
 
2006-05-03 12:52:26 PM  
biohazard, if it's been stored properly, you could probably name your price.
I got into craft beer a year too late, so my VE series starts with the 03.
This year's batch is set to be released on my birthday woot!
 
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