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(Abc.net.au)   The ecological effects of the 5,600 km Australian dingo fence can be seen from space   (abc.net.au) divider line
    More: Interesting, Australia, Dingo, Animal, Ecosystem, Great Australian Bight, South Australia, Government, Mammal  
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1040 clicks; posted to STEM » on 09 Feb 2023 at 1:41 AM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



13 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2023-02-08 10:30:54 PM  
Jesus, the dingo eats one baby...
 
2023-02-08 10:47:11 PM  
i.pinimg.comView Full Size
 
2023-02-09 2:21:39 AM  
Nature works best when balanced.  predators are part of that
 
2023-02-09 2:47:16 AM  
The fence is useful tho

And why only the NSW perspective? Oh that's right, ABC...
 
2023-02-09 2:53:51 AM  
Finally, an article that lets me truly let loose on the scroll wheel!
 
2023-02-09 4:28:45 AM  
We're still trying to get Mexico to pay for it.
 
2023-02-09 8:02:54 AM  
My license plate can be read from space
 
2023-02-09 8:12:35 AM  
If you know what to look for, you can see its effects from space. Here's a single cherry-picked aerial shot, where the slight difference in ground vegetation could be explained by any number of things.

I'm certainly willing to believe the article's premise - the need for apex predators (although it seems suboptimal to argue for what is essentially a feral dog introduced by humans) - but as usual, it's a clickbaity headline that discredits the actual science of the article.
 
2023-02-09 11:28:27 AM  

Boomstickz: The fence is useful tho

And why only the NSW perspective? Oh that's right, ABC...



Umm.. Probably because you didn't read the whole article?
 
2023-02-09 1:30:24 PM  
In the unfenced area the apex predators are people with guns, roads, and dingoes.

Inside the fence the environment is managed and there is not a typical predator:prey pyramid. The undomesticated wildlife generally go about their business. The Roos have lost a predator, but they are generally being managed by humans anyway. Smaller predators that don't harm the sheep have replaced the dingoes inside the fence. The tighter relationship has allowed denser and more woody vegetation to thrive which helps with topsoil conservation inside the fence.
 
2023-02-09 3:53:20 PM  

robv83: Boomstickz: The fence is useful tho

And why only the NSW perspective? Oh that's right, ABC...


Umm.. Probably because you didn't read the whole article?


No view on SA?

There is a bit less 1080 used south of the fence.

They are rather cruel creatures tho (cats are the same/worse)

It's a wierd place, with its own unique environment. The geographical change from one end of the fence to the other is rather interesting when your out there.

I guess what's the other view? Hey rid of the fence or breed better (different) livestock out there?
 
2023-02-09 5:13:06 PM  
Way more babies inside the fence, though.
 
2023-02-09 8:34:03 PM  

dyhchong: Way more babies inside the fence, though.


Well when I took my daughter out that far for the first time, I did mention that we have Dingo bait with us.

It didn't go down well.
 
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