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(BBC-US)   Amazon workers: "The robots in the Amazon warehouses are treated better than we are"   (bbc.com) divider line
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875 clicks; posted to Business » on 25 Jan 2023 at 6:30 PM (9 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



43 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2023-01-25 4:27:40 PM  
That's  because they don't  biatch and moan all the time. " waa waa, i need to pee! waa waa, I have to have lunch."
 
2023-01-25 4:38:33 PM  
People can be fired and replaced at the drop of a hat. You don't own employees you rent them. Robots are owned, you need to care for things you own.
Think of the way you drive your car vs a rental. Odds are your car gets lovingly maintained while the rental gets driven through the desert at 120mph until the radiator pops and you leave it for dead and catch a ride on another rental.
 
2023-01-25 6:33:32 PM  
I call for a full on strike of amazon warehouse workers.  Let's see if the World Engine can handle even one week of a total shutdown of amazon.

Problem solved.
 
2023-01-25 6:34:18 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size


"400 years ago on the planet Earth, workers who felt their livelihood threatened by automation flung their wooden shoes called sabots into the machines to stop them. Hence the word 'sabotage.'."
 
2023-01-25 6:37:08 PM  
Amazon paid way more for the robots. *shrug*
 
2023-01-25 6:37:50 PM  

AmbassadorBooze: I call for a full on strike of amazon warehouse workers.  Let's see if the World Engine can handle even one week of a total shutdown of amazon.

Problem solved.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2023-01-25 6:41:47 PM  
preview.redd.itView Full Size
 
2023-01-25 6:42:21 PM  
they cost more
 
2023-01-25 6:50:16 PM  

AmbassadorBooze: I call for a full on strike of amazon warehouse workers.  Let's see if the World Engine can handle even one week of a total shutdown of amazon.

Problem solved.


100% agree!
Except for the ones that fulfill my orders. They can stay on and strike in spirit.
 
2023-01-25 6:54:29 PM  
I'm not trying to be a jerk, but isn't that standard practice for all hourly workers?

I've had quite a few jobs, and all my hourly jobs had designated periods of time for breaks/lunch. I couldn't go off and use the restroom whenever I wanted.
 
2023-01-25 7:07:11 PM  
Amazon also doesn't question if the robots need a break.

"Part won't be in for 3 days. Put it in the corner so nothing else gets damaged" vs "Doctor said you needed 2 weeks off your feet to recover from the surgery? You're approved for 48 hours. Anything else will burn your vacation time"
 
2023-01-25 7:23:08 PM  
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2023-01-25 7:40:19 PM  

Fark_Guy_Rob: I'm not trying to be a jerk, but isn't that standard practice for all hourly workers?

I've had quite a few jobs, and all my hourly jobs had designated periods of time for breaks/lunch. I couldn't go off and use the restroom whenever I wanted.


That's generally not legal and opens the company up to lawsuits.  If you gotta go, you gotta go, and it's unhealthy to keep it in.

There are exceptions where an employer can require an employee to hold it in.  For example a crane operator might have to spend 20 minutes climbing down the crane then 20 minutes climbing back up, but for the most part, workers have to be able to use the restroom whenever they need it.

/source, I was management at a factory for years.
//Had 3 workers who were lactose intolerant yet kept drinking milk at one point.
///During the pandemic I threatened workers not wearing their mask properly with sticking them in a room with them and getting them all a glass of milk from the vending machine.
 
2023-01-25 7:40:56 PM  

Fark_Guy_Rob: I'm not trying to be a jerk, but isn't that standard practice for all hourly workers?

I've had quite a few jobs, and all my hourly jobs had designated periods of time for breaks/lunch. I couldn't go off and use the restroom whenever I wanted.


Oh you must be new here.

Someone will be along shortly to explain why cashiers should be making at least $80k a year, fast food workers $110k, and why you should be required to treat waitstaff like people.
 
2023-01-25 7:44:49 PM  

spacechecker: Fark_Guy_Rob: I'm not trying to be a jerk, but isn't that standard practice for all hourly workers?

I've had quite a few jobs, and all my hourly jobs had designated periods of time for breaks/lunch. I couldn't go off and use the restroom whenever I wanted.

Oh you must be new here.

Someone will be along shortly to explain why cashiers should be making at least $80k a year, fast food workers $110k, and why you should be required to treat waitstaff like people.


Wait, why wouldn't you treat waitstaff like people?
 
2023-01-25 7:45:33 PM  
And this surprises people?  Look, robots get medical benefits too and they aren't whiners.

Also, robots don't steal or take bathroom breaks.  They get to go home (charging station) and rest to recharge just like humans.  What they don't get to do is go on vacation.
 
2023-01-25 7:49:30 PM  
Equipment like that costs money.  Don't you slaves....er, 'workers', know anything?

blazing saddles quicksand scene
Youtube DiUdtxe2YnU
 
2023-01-25 7:50:36 PM  

electricjebus: spacechecker: Fark_Guy_Rob: I'm not trying to be a jerk, but isn't that standard practice for all hourly workers?

I've had quite a few jobs, and all my hourly jobs had designated periods of time for breaks/lunch. I couldn't go off and use the restroom whenever I wanted.

Oh you must be new here.

Someone will be along shortly to explain why cashiers should be making at least $80k a year, fast food workers $110k, and why you should be required to treat waitstaff like people.

Wait, why wouldn't you treat waitstaff like people?


My post may not have been intended to be taken seriously.

Also, waitstaff and their ilk are beneath me.
 
2023-01-25 7:51:45 PM  
Regarding the headline for this thread, well, OF COURSE! Robots and other machineries are assets. Workers are liabilities.

If you want to be treated well and earn a good, reasonably long salary, learn everything about those robots and become the fixers, maintenance person, utilizers of them.
 
2023-01-25 7:53:22 PM  

spacechecker: electricjebus: spacechecker: Fark_Guy_Rob: I'm not trying to be a jerk, but isn't that standard practice for all hourly workers?

I've had quite a few jobs, and all my hourly jobs had designated periods of time for breaks/lunch. I couldn't go off and use the restroom whenever I wanted.

Oh you must be new here.

Someone will be along shortly to explain why cashiers should be making at least $80k a year, fast food workers $110k, and why you should be required to treat waitstaff like people.

Wait, why wouldn't you treat waitstaff like people?

My post may not have been intended to be taken seriously.

Also, waitstaff and their ilk are beneath me.


Gotcha.
 
2023-01-25 8:00:35 PM  

spacechecker: Fark_Guy_Rob: I'm not trying to be a jerk, but isn't that standard practice for all hourly workers?

I've had quite a few jobs, and all my hourly jobs had designated periods of time for breaks/lunch. I couldn't go off and use the restroom whenever I wanted.

Oh you must be new here.

Someone will be along shortly to explain why cashiers should be making at least $80k a year, fast food workers $110k, and why you should be required to treat waitstaff like people.


They should work for that amount. That way, it spurs innovation because labor cost is high, so owners will look for alternative means to take money and flip burgers. That in turn creates a new industry, which will require even more people to employ, as well as bolstering secondary existing industries because these newly employed people in the new industry will have money to spend and will be happy to pay $15 for a hamburger (as long as it's made with organic free ranch grass-fed cattle, placed between gluten free buns and smothered in aioli). BTW, here in SF, $15 hamburgers is probably on the low end for any non-chain burger.
 
2023-01-25 8:01:03 PM  

spacechecker: Fark_Guy_Rob: I'm not trying to be a jerk, but isn't that standard practice for all hourly workers?

I've had quite a few jobs, and all my hourly jobs had designated periods of time for breaks/lunch. I couldn't go off and use the restroom whenever I wanted.

Oh you must be new here.

Someone will be along shortly to explain why cashiers should be making at least $80k a year, fast food workers $110k, and why you should be required to treat waitstaff like people.


Me, personally, I've never cared for sputum, urine, ejaculate or pubic hairs in my food - but, you do you, tough guy.
 
2023-01-25 8:03:26 PM  

jso2897: spacechecker: Fark_Guy_Rob: I'm not trying to be a jerk, but isn't that standard practice for all hourly workers?

I've had quite a few jobs, and all my hourly jobs had designated periods of time for breaks/lunch. I couldn't go off and use the restroom whenever I wanted.

Oh you must be new here.

Someone will be along shortly to explain why cashiers should be making at least $80k a year, fast food workers $110k, and why you should be required to treat waitstaff like people.

Me, personally, I've never cared for sputum, urine, ejaculate or pubic hairs in my food - but, you do you, tough guy.


They put the extras in anyways.  Do you think they have a whole extra special kitchen just for the jizz burgers?  So they don't cross contaminate?
 
2023-01-25 8:09:15 PM  
My boss makes a dollar, I make a dime. Therefor I poop on the company's time.
 
2023-01-25 9:01:15 PM  

dericwater: Regarding the headline for this thread, well, OF COURSE! Robots and other machineries are assets. Workers are liabilities.

If you want to be treated well and earn a good, reasonably long salary, learn everything about those robots and become the fixers, maintenance person, utilizers of them.


Mr Westwood said there was a huge range of different nationalities who work at Coventry. "They don't understand this is the UK - we can organise a union, we can protest, we can withdraw our labour," he added.

Okay, so about 5% of the population fixes, maintains and utilizes all the robots who now make up the vast majority of the manual labor

So........who's going to buy their products?  The robots?

Even then, it sounds alot like the trend of outsourcing to India, which ended up costing more because well..... I shouldn't have to explain that.

And even if robots do become that competent, the earth will be on fire anyways.

However Keith Richard's will still be around.
 
2023-01-25 9:08:50 PM  
Two Amazon workers, who are members of the GMB, said the robots in the warehouse "are treated better than us".

Some would call that "foreshadowing."
 
2023-01-25 9:17:31 PM  

links136: dericwater: Regarding the headline for this thread, well, OF COURSE! Robots and other machineries are assets. Workers are liabilities.

If you want to be treated well and earn a good, reasonably long salary, learn everything about those robots and become the fixers, maintenance person, utilizers of them.

Mr Westwood said there was a huge range of different nationalities who work at Coventry. "They don't understand this is the UK - we can organise a union, we can protest, we can withdraw our labour," he added.

Okay, so about 5% of the population fixes, maintains and utilizes all the robots who now make up the vast majority of the manual labor

So........who's going to buy their products?  The robots?

Even then, it sounds alot like the trend of outsourcing to India, which ended up costing more because well..... I shouldn't have to explain that.

And even if robots do become that competent, the earth will be on fire anyways.

However Keith Richard's will still be around.


It has always been the case that when technology is adopted, more jobs get created. This has happened since time immemorial. Sure, the technology kills the jobs that it takes over, but very soon after, new jobs arise that no one ever even thought of. When Gutenberg created the printing press, did it cause a drop in jobs in the long run? No, thousands of jobs that would never have been created, had they kept to having monks manually writing down things, were suddenly (or very soon after) were created. Book sellers, typographers creating the fonts, pressers, paper makers, brokers who sold paper, ink makers... and those are just the people in the immediate industry. They became wealthy and went from poor to middle class and were able to buy better shoes and better clothes, which helped the shoemakers and the clothiers expand. They, in turn, needed to expand to keep up with the demand, and their prosperity snowballed to other industries.

When the automobile came into existence in the late 1800s/early 1900s, did it kill the horse-drawn carriage and wagon industry? For sure. But the auto industry created the largest ever workforce in the United States and the world. Millions upon millions of people are involved in the auto industry, from building cars to building specialized parts to financing, repairing, upgrading, refurbishing, training, entertainment (race cars), and so many more. And again, that's just in the immediate industry of the auto industry. Those people working in Michigan saw their incomes rose and their wealth allowed them to buy better shoes and clothes (much like in any other previous generation) and eat at finer restaurants.

This always happens. So when these robots replace human workers, yeah, the burger flipping job will be gone, but there will be hundreds of secondary jobs popping up. I can't tell you what they are, but they will pop up.

Before the automobile, no one would have predicted that motels would be a thing (first one was in 1925 in San Luis Obispo, and it wasn't the Madonna Inn). No one would have predicted Disneyland style theme parks. Those would never exist in its size and grandeur while people had horses for transportation.
 
2023-01-25 9:56:19 PM  
I like Kurt Vonnegut's solution.

Private corporation can not own robots that replace Union Workers.
They have to 'rent' the robot from the Union. And pay union wages which are distributed to the displaced workers or others can buy 'shares' of the robot worker. Maintenance and upkeep are negotiated under the Union "health care" plan.
 
2023-01-25 10:55:08 PM  
It looks like Amazon workers in Coventry are striking over their "derisory" 5% pay rise and "severe" working conditions. The workers claim that even their toilet breaks are timed, and if they take too long, they get questioned by managers. I can't help but imagine Amazon's warehouse as a giant game of "Where's Waldo", but instead of looking for a bespectacled man in a red and white striped shirt, managers are on the lookout for employees taking too long in the bathroom. "Sorry, I can't help you with your order right now, I'm busy counting how many squares of toilet paper an employee used."
 
2023-01-25 11:38:07 PM  

Fark_Guy_Rob: I'm not trying to be a jerk, but isn't that standard practice for all hourly workers?

I've had quite a few jobs, and all my hourly jobs had designated periods of time for breaks/lunch. I couldn't go off and use the restroom whenever I wanted.


I have ulcerative colitis. Any boss that didn't allow me to use the restroom when I needed to would have very much regretted it, often within minutes.
 
2023-01-26 12:19:39 AM  

sithon: That's  because they don't  biatch and moan all the time. " waa waa, i need to pee! waa waa, I have to have lunch."


"Low battery"
"Null pointer exception"
"Get Windows 10"
 
2023-01-26 12:51:13 AM  

Fark_Guy_Rob: I'm not trying to be a jerk, but isn't that standard practice for all hourly workers?

I've had quite a few jobs, and all my hourly jobs had designated periods of time for breaks/lunch. I couldn't go off and use the restroom whenever I wanted.


Not in my experience. When I worked those jobs on my own, I went to use the toilet at the first quiet moment when I needed it. When I was working with someone else, I went after letting my cow orker know that I would be away for a couple of minutes.

It seems that I was fortunate to not have employers so untrusting as to feel the need to micromanage every minute of my working day. Others are not so lucky.
 
2023-01-26 2:13:59 AM  
if you are worried about a robot taking your job get a STEM education and go into robot maintenance. I am sure cartwrights and blacksmiths were just as whiney when cars came out.
 
2023-01-26 2:49:51 AM  

chucknasty: if you are worried about a robot taking your job get a STEM education and go into robot maintenance. I am sure cartwrights and blacksmiths were just as whiney when cars came out.


"I don't care if society collapses, as long as I have job."
 
2023-01-26 3:28:50 AM  

dericwater: links136: dericwater: Regarding the headline for this thread, well, OF COURSE! Robots and other machineries are assets. Workers are liabilities.

If you want to be treated well and earn a good, reasonably long salary, learn everything about those robots and become the fixers, maintenance person, utilizers of them.

Mr Westwood said there was a huge range of different nationalities who work at Coventry. "They don't understand this is the UK - we can organise a union, we can protest, we can withdraw our labour," he added.

Okay, so about 5% of the population fixes, maintains and utilizes all the robots who now make up the vast majority of the manual labor

So........who's going to buy their products?  The robots?

Even then, it sounds alot like the trend of outsourcing to India, which ended up costing more because well..... I shouldn't have to explain that.

And even if robots do become that competent, the earth will be on fire anyways.

However Keith Richard's will still be around.

It has always been the case that when technology is adopted, more jobs get created. This has happened since time immemorial. Sure, the technology kills the jobs that it takes over, but very soon after, new jobs arise that no one ever even thought of. When Gutenberg created the printing press, did it cause a drop in jobs in the long run? No, thousands of jobs that would never have been created, had they kept to having monks manually writing down things, were suddenly (or very soon after) were created. Book sellers, typographers creating the fonts, pressers, paper makers, brokers who sold paper, ink makers... and those are just the people in the immediate industry. They became wealthy and went from poor to middle class and were able to buy better shoes and better clothes, which helped the shoemakers and the clothiers expand. They, in turn, needed to expand to keep up with the demand, and their prosperity snowballed to other industries.

When the automobile came into existence in the late 1800s/early 1900s, did it kill the horse-drawn carriage and wagon industry? For sure. But the auto industry created the largest ever workforce in the United States and the world. Millions upon millions of people are involved in the auto industry, from building cars to building specialized parts to financing, repairing, upgrading, refurbishing, training, entertainment (race cars), and so many more. And again, that's just in the immediate industry of the auto industry. Those people working in Michigan saw their incomes rose and their wealth allowed them to buy better shoes and clothes (much like in any other previous generation) and eat at finer restaurants.

This always happens. So when these robots replace human workers, yeah, the burger flipping job will be gone, but there will be hundreds of secondary jobs popping up. I can't tell you what they are, but they will pop up.

Before the automobile, no one would have predicted that motels would be a thing (first one was in 1925 in San Luis Obispo, and it wasn't the Madonna Inn). No one would have predicted Disneyland style theme parks. Those would never exist in its size and grandeur while people had horses for transportation.


This is both a Pollyanna and backwards thinking mindset and not the apples to apples comparison you think it is.

One - proportionally, no more jobs haven't been created.

Two - new industries arise because the machines can't think yet.   When that happens we are well on our way to a post scarcity society (and already in the beginning) and we need to rethink capitalism and compensation.  I have no doubt the elites will create a happy utopia/s
 
2023-01-26 3:40:24 AM  

DaMannimal: This is both a Pollyanna and backwards thinking mindset and not the apples to apples comparison you think it is.

One - proportionally, no more jobs haven't been created.

Two - new industries arise because the machines can't think yet.   When that happens we are well on our way to a post scarcity society (and already in the beginning) and we need to rethink capitalism and compensation.  I have no doubt the elites will create a happy utopia/s


It's you who is thinking backwards. Thinking doesn't give you anything more useful than a jack hammer that isn't used. When people figure out how to use thinking tools, it means, tautologically, that there will be a market for their utility. When there is a market, then there is money to be made. And when there is money to be made, people will have jobs to do to take advantage of that money made. It has always been the case and will always be the case.
 
2023-01-26 4:20:18 AM  
Not giving specific instruction, but just a reminder that robots don't have a habit of running to HR when they are sexually harassed.
 
2023-01-26 6:46:44 AM  
I feel like the best thing for amazon is to pay for a day's wages for 2-3 hours worth of work. How much money are they spending on these lawsuits and mistakes due to employees being exhausted? Don't have to worry about lunch breaks or anything like that.
 
2023-01-26 7:30:35 AM  
Amazon workers: "The robots in the Amazon warehouses are treated better than we are"

So to maximize worker welfare there should be fewer humans and more robots.
 
2023-01-26 7:39:53 AM  

optikeye: I like Kurt Vonnegut's solution.

Private corporation can not own robots that replace Union Workers.
They have to 'rent' the robot from the Union. And pay union wages which are distributed to the displaced workers or others can buy 'shares' of the robot worker. Maintenance and upkeep are negotiated under the Union "health care" plan.


That's a new one (to me), and interesting. There'd have to be some way of preventing the unions from furnishing the shiattiest robots possible so that the company would have to have more than it would otherwise need to get the output it requires.
 
2023-01-26 1:27:52 PM  

optikeye: I like Kurt Vonnegut's solution.

Private corporation can not own robots that replace Union Workers.
They have to 'rent' the robot from the Union. And pay union wages which are distributed to the displaced workers or others can buy 'shares' of the robot worker. Maintenance and upkeep are negotiated under the Union "health care" plan.


If Unions were smart, they would take on a significant stake in any technology that they use. When John Henry was being obsoleted by the steam-powered hammer, he shouldn't fight it by going head-to-head against it. Yes, he won that day. But he died doing so. He should have understood how the device worked and then pitched himself as the main salesperson for that device: "I'm John Henry and this here is going to be my new 12 lb hammer! Get one now from HammerCo. You heard it first from John Henry!" And then ask for a stake in the company. Every Union should do that.
 
2023-01-26 4:21:12 PM  

dericwater: optikeye: I like Kurt Vonnegut's solution.

Private corporation can not own robots that replace Union Workers.
They have to 'rent' the robot from the Union. And pay union wages which are distributed to the displaced workers or others can buy 'shares' of the robot worker. Maintenance and upkeep are negotiated under the Union "health care" plan.

If Unions were smart, they would take on a significant stake in any technology that they use. When John Henry was being obsoleted by the steam-powered hammer, he shouldn't fight it by going head-to-head against it. Yes, he won that day. But he died doing so. He should have understood how the device worked and then pitched himself as the main salesperson for that device: "I'm John Henry and this here is going to be my new 12 lb hammer! Get one now from HammerCo. You heard it first from John Henry!" And then ask for a stake in the company. Every Union should do that.


Like Capital would let the workers do that
 
2023-01-26 6:52:10 PM  

guinsu: dericwater: optikeye: I like Kurt Vonnegut's solution.

Private corporation can not own robots that replace Union Workers.
They have to 'rent' the robot from the Union. And pay union wages which are distributed to the displaced workers or others can buy 'shares' of the robot worker. Maintenance and upkeep are negotiated under the Union "health care" plan.

If Unions were smart, they would take on a significant stake in any technology that they use. When John Henry was being obsoleted by the steam-powered hammer, he shouldn't fight it by going head-to-head against it. Yes, he won that day. But he died doing so. He should have understood how the device worked and then pitched himself as the main salesperson for that device: "I'm John Henry and this here is going to be my new 12 lb hammer! Get one now from HammerCo. You heard it first from John Henry!" And then ask for a stake in the company. Every Union should do that.

Like Capital would let the workers do that


To add to that, they definitely wouldn't have hired a black guy to be a salesman at that time.

/John Wick fears me
 
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