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(APM Marketplace)   Why Gen Z is the most pro-union generation. It's almost like they don't want a future with few jobs, low pay, endless hours, and lots of debt   (marketplace.org) divider line
    More: Cool, Trade union, Collective bargaining, Generation Y, Employment, labor unions, young people, Strike action, most pro-union generation  
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507 clicks; posted to Business » on 06 Jan 2023 at 7:05 AM (10 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



41 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2023-01-06 5:58:49 AM  
Hey, I did my best to raise my girl with some of the values I grew up with. And in this case, I'm glad that she and her generation are at least listening.

There's a bunch of other stuff that I grew up with, that I want to keep her from experiencing. And she has been listening that that too.
 
2023-01-06 8:35:00 AM  
The Reagan revolution is finally trickling down to serfs versus billionaires & their cronies.

Remember class warfare is NOT rich against poor. It's the rich convincing the poor to fight each other.
 
2023-01-06 8:35:32 AM  
What until they here about things called "pensions"
 
2023-01-06 8:40:53 AM  
Unions work great when the membership has their thumbs on the union bosses to do the right thing.

It's great to be a member of a great union.

/A bad union is worse than no union
//My grandparents worked for a bad union
///Worked alongside another union that shot the golden goose in the head
 
2023-01-06 8:48:27 AM  

Hyjamon: What until they here about things called "pensions"


You know what, pensions kind of suck.  Well hear me out here, pensions are usually setup to be most beneficial for someone who's spent their entire working life at the one place which is exceptionally rare these days.  They do not benefit someone who only puts a few years into a place and then moves on, and they aren't attractive to someone who's been working for a decade or two and wants to now settle into an org that's pension based as their biggest benefit.

Plus there's pensions that are not as bullet proof as you'd hope, with corporate raiders looting the funds years later and literally robbing you of that promised benefit.  See what happened to Sears for instance.  Fark many years ago the sitting Conservative government of Canada literally raided the public sector pension fund to balance their budget.

Pensions can be amazing, but I think they need a re-work to be more protected and some how rebalanced so that it doesn't take 30+ freakin' years to get anything meaningful out of them.

/peace out
//public sector union member with a pension coming when he eventually retires
 
2023-01-06 8:48:42 AM  
Be careful who you hire to help when management sends in goons to crack your skulls.
 
2023-01-06 8:48:55 AM  
I can appreciate the generalization that unions got a bit ridiculous in their demands at times having worked along side, but never for a union. But I'd rather have those kinds of people working for me than allowing businesses to set the terms like is the norm now.
 
2023-01-06 9:16:31 AM  

BumpInTheNight: Hyjamon: What until they here about things called "pensions"

You know what, pensions kind of suck.  Well hear me out here, pensions are usually setup to be most beneficial for someone who's spent their entire working life at the one place which is exceptionally rare these days.  They do not benefit someone who only puts a few years into a place and then moves on, and they aren't attractive to someone who's been working for a decade or two and wants to now settle into an org that's pension based as their biggest benefit.

Plus there's pensions that are not as bullet proof as you'd hope, with corporate raiders looting the funds years later and literally robbing you of that promised benefit.  See what happened to Sears for instance.  Fark many years ago the sitting Conservative government of Canada literally raided the public sector pension fund to balance their budget.

Pensions can be amazing, but I think they need a re-work to be more protected and some how rebalanced so that it doesn't take 30+ freakin' years to get anything meaningful out of them.

/peace out
//public sector union member with a pension coming when he eventually retires


In my union, the pension (and healthcare!) is tied to the industry, not the specific workplace. You can work at any job anywhere that's a part of the union, and your pension/healthcare remains the same.

It was set up this way decades ago because jobs don't last a long time in my industry (it wasn't unusual to see turnover every year), but I think it's kind of prescient now. I wish more industries offered similar deals -- it really helps people learn new skills from different roles and not stress out too much when they're inevitably let go.
 
2023-01-06 9:20:53 AM  
(Upon reflection: it's probably this way in most unions I'm guessing? Haha, sorry if what I posted is the whole point of unions; I only have experience with my own, and I just woke up.)
 
2023-01-06 9:42:02 AM  

Sairobi: (Upon reflection: it's probably this way in most unions I'm guessing? Haha, sorry if what I posted is the whole point of unions; I only have experience with my own, and I just woke up.)


For a wide-reaching union which is backing the pension I think that's par for the course, but not all pensions are tied to such unions.  Like in my Sears example that was specific to working for that one company.

In my case I work for the Canadian Federal government, so similar to your setup I could hop between appendages of the government and my pension would follow me, but in my field (IT) the competition is not within the government its vs private opportunities, where my pension would not follow.  Our government's lead on compensation has always been out of touch on this and because of that we're under paid compared to private opportunities, justifying it by the end-game defined pension benefit which makes it a pair of golden handcuffs.

So for someone like me who's topped out pay wise as a worker drone but and has no interest in the management career track I'm stalled and frustrated.  My choices are continue to work within the government and get that sweet pension, or throw away all that time sunk into that benefit and head back out into the private industry.  Sure if I stayed private and retired then one day the pension would kick in but it would be a tiny percentage of its value since the whole thing is slanted to reward sticking beyond 25+ years of public service vs the first 25 years of it.
 
2023-01-06 9:46:18 AM  
A generation that got to see their parents get laid off so corp A could increase the share price by a few tenths of a penny and older siblings struggle to find any job at all supporting the stability implied by a union? Who'da thunk it.
 
2023-01-06 9:53:39 AM  
The question is, why were previous generations not as pro-union? It's baffling

I mean I actually know why, I have a relative who benefited greatly from unions and doesn't like them. He thinks they protect "lazy" workers. A lot of Americans would rather turn down a free $10,000 if you told them a lazy person would also get $1000 as a part of the deal. But it's still baffling
 
2023-01-06 10:04:09 AM  
And they wonder why there are no jobs in America, and the few American made products cost an arm and a leg.

Youth does not convey intelligence.
 
2023-01-06 10:10:53 AM  

born_yesterday: Be careful who you hire to help when management sends in goons to crack your skulls.


User name does not check out. Born_1890 would be closer.
 
2023-01-06 10:15:03 AM  
Good I hope union membership grows and we start new tax laws to get rid of the modern day robber barrons.
 
2023-01-06 10:26:21 AM  

TheGreatGazoo: Unions work great when the membership has their thumbs on the union bosses to do the right thing.

It's great to be a member of a great union.

/A bad union is worse than no union
//My grandparents worked for a bad union
///Worked alongside another union that shot the golden goose in the head


My former union used to tell us they had to figure out how to help management. Quite the "Partnership" they had there.
 
2023-01-06 10:34:46 AM  

Hyjamon: What until they here about things called "pensions"


Where?
 
2023-01-06 10:39:57 AM  

BumpInTheNight: Hyjamon: What until they here about things called "pensions"

You know what, pensions kind of suck.  Well hear me out here, pensions are usually setup to be most beneficial for someone who's spent their entire working life at the one place which is exceptionally rare these days.  They do not benefit someone who only puts a few years into a place and then moves on, and they aren't attractive to someone who's been working for a decade or two and wants to now settle into an org that's pension based as their biggest benefit.

Plus there's pensions that are not as bullet proof as you'd hope, with corporate raiders looting the funds years later and literally robbing you of that promised benefit.  See what happened to Sears for instance.  Fark many years ago the sitting Conservative government of Canada literally raided the public sector pension fund to balance their budget.

Pensions can be amazing, but I think they need a re-work to be more protected and some how rebalanced so that it doesn't take 30+ freakin' years to get anything meaningful out of them.

/peace out
//public sector union member with a pension coming when he eventually retires


This.

Pensions, unions and similar barriers to entry kill mobility.

If you want to be in the top 5% of software engineers in terms of salary, you can get a book and learn all there is to know, ace some leet code challenges or whatever, get ace a technical interview and just be amazing. Luck, networking whatever else can be a factor but nothing is preventing it and I know at least one guy who dropped out of college, worked at a comic book store then worked at Google and now makes vastly more than I do.

If you want to be in the 5% of high school teachers or union painters you need to get in as young as possible, build up tenure for however long it takes based on whatever the pay schedule is. You need 20+ years of playing the system, at the same place, at which point they know, and you know, that you are making far more than someone with five years of experience who is able to do your job just as well and then they start doing everything to force you out early, if they can.

My Father-in-law made serious bank working for an electric company in a tiny town in the middle of nowhere...he just started at 18 and never left, until the forced him to take early retirement. He could never move to another town and he could never change jobs without committing financial suicide.
 
2023-01-06 10:43:32 AM  

BumpInTheNight: Hyjamon: What until they here about things called "pensions"

You know what, pensions kind of suck.  Well hear me out here, pensions are usually setup to be most beneficial for someone who's spent their entire working life at the one place which is exceptionally rare these days.  They do not benefit someone who only puts a few years into a place and then moves on, and they aren't attractive to someone who's been working for a decade or two and wants to now settle into an org that's pension based as their biggest benefit.

Plus there's pensions that are not as bullet proof as you'd hope, with corporate raiders looting the funds years later and literally robbing you of that promised benefit.  See what happened to Sears for instance.  Fark many years ago the sitting Conservative government of Canada literally raided the public sector pension fund to balance their budget.

Pensions can be amazing, but I think they need a re-work to be more protected and some how rebalanced so that it doesn't take 30+ freakin' years to get anything meaningful out of them.

/peace out
//public sector union member with a pension coming when he eventually retires


But you're talking about the tail wagging the dog, there.  Why don't people stay at a job like it's a career anymore?  The corporations and corporo-media will tell you that millennials and Zers just love to bounce around.  Same way they just love renting instead of buying a house.

I think no one stays at a job because the benefits suck now. When you have a nice pension and generous vacation time, and paid sick time built up, and nice health insurance, you don't quit for an extra 25¢ an hour. But why wouldn't you take that job when take home pay is the only meaningful benefit? - when you have a self-guided retirement account, and "unlimited PTO" that you're not really supposed to take, and you're paying 50% of the "employer sponsored" health insurance premium (that's not a fringe benefit, by the way - that's your boss telling you what insurance to buy).
 
2023-01-06 10:57:53 AM  

BumpInTheNight: Hyjamon: What until they here about things called "pensions"

You know what, pensions kind of suck.  Well hear me out here, pensions are usually setup to be most beneficial for someone who's spent their entire working life at the one place which is exceptionally rare these days.  They do not benefit someone who only puts a few years into a place and then moves on, and they aren't attractive to someone who's been working for a decade or two and wants to now settle into an org that's pension based as their biggest benefit.

Plus there's pensions that are not as bullet proof as you'd hope, with corporate raiders looting the funds years later and literally robbing you of that promised benefit.  See what happened to Sears for instance.  Fark many years ago the sitting Conservative government of Canada literally raided the public sector pension fund to balance their budget.

Pensions can be amazing, but I think they need a re-work to be more protected and some how rebalanced so that it doesn't take 30+ freakin' years to get anything meaningful out of them.

/peace out
//public sector union member with a pension coming when he eventually retires


Pensions, like healthcare, shouldn't be linked to individual jobs. Instead, they should basically be Social Security: managed by the government, and linked to a person and not a company.
 
2023-01-06 11:05:38 AM  
I find subby gives people way too much credit for a rational thought process here.

"Why Gen Z is the most pro-union generation. It's almost like they don't want a future with few jobs, low pay, endless hours, and lots of debt"


I think the simpler truth of us all is, the pendulum just swings as people just react.

If the 80s-00 were the era of greed is good to no time for work only party, and so it just seems simplistically predictable that the swing to prove you are your own generation doing your own thing, would inevitably wind up moving in this direction next after what we just came though to get here.


Would be nice if it were a more considered contentious process, but i kind of doubt it.
 
2023-01-06 11:16:37 AM  

PvtStash: I find subby gives people way too much credit for a rational thought process here.

"Why Gen Z is the most pro-union generation. It's almost like they don't want a future with few jobs, low pay, endless hours, and lots of debt"


I think the simpler truth of us all is, the pendulum just swings as people just react.

If the 80s-00 were the era of greed is good to no time for work only party, and so it just seems simplistically predictable that the swing to prove you are your own generation doing your own thing, would inevitably wind up moving in this direction next after what we just came though to get here.


Would be nice if it were a more considered contentious process, but i kind of doubt it.


I think that's vastly oversimplifying things, and counting on too-obvious trends continuing far into the future in ways you have zero evidence to support. As a counterpoint to your hypothesis, remember in the late 90's and early 00's when everyone was convinced that thanks to demographics, Republicans would be a complete non-entity by this time? That didn't happen, because predicting these big demographic social trends is never as simple as "pendulum moves back and forth."
 
2023-01-06 11:36:15 AM  

Lusiphur: remember in the late 90's and early 00's when everyone was convinced that thanks to demographics, Republicans would be a complete non-entity by this time?


The GOP would have become a non-entity if they had not fixed elections through gerrymandering, strict "voter fraud" laws, and other shenanigans.

Why do you think they do those things?
 
2023-01-06 12:21:00 PM  

Lusiphur: BumpInTheNight: Hyjamon: What until they here about things called "pensions"

You know what, pensions kind of suck.  Well hear me out here, pensions are usually setup to be most beneficial for someone who's spent their entire working life at the one place which is exceptionally rare these days.  They do not benefit someone who only puts a few years into a place and then moves on, and they aren't attractive to someone who's been working for a decade or two and wants to now settle into an org that's pension based as their biggest benefit.

Plus there's pensions that are not as bullet proof as you'd hope, with corporate raiders looting the funds years later and literally robbing you of that promised benefit.  See what happened to Sears for instance.  Fark many years ago the sitting Conservative government of Canada literally raided the public sector pension fund to balance their budget.

Pensions can be amazing, but I think they need a re-work to be more protected and some how rebalanced so that it doesn't take 30+ freakin' years to get anything meaningful out of them.

/peace out
//public sector union member with a pension coming when he eventually retires

Pensions, like healthcare, shouldn't be linked to individual jobs. Instead, they should basically be Social Security: managed by the government, and linked to a person and not a company.


Yeah, the government has done such a great job with SS, we should give them more
 
2023-01-06 12:21:04 PM  

Lusiphur: PvtStash: I find subby gives people way too much credit for a rational thought process here.

"Why Gen Z is the most pro-union generation. It's almost like they don't want a future with few jobs, low pay, endless hours, and lots of debt"


I think the simpler truth of us all is, the pendulum just swings as people just react.

If the 80s-00 were the era of greed is good to no time for work only party, and so it just seems simplistically predictable that the swing to prove you are your own generation doing your own thing, would inevitably wind up moving in this direction next after what we just came though to get here.


Would be nice if it were a more considered contentious process, but i kind of doubt it.

I think that's vastly oversimplifying things, and counting on too-obvious trends continuing far into the future in ways you have zero evidence to support. As a counterpoint to your hypothesis, remember in the late 90's and early 00's when everyone was convinced that thanks to demographics, Republicans would be a complete non-entity by this time? That didn't happen, because predicting these big demographic social trends is never as simple as "pendulum moves back and forth."



No i don't recall that being a prediction,i was likely too young at that time to have absorbed that.

However my POV is to not imagine predicting anything so exactly specific like that.
The "other side of the pendulum swing" has unknowable specificity in it as far as exact outcomes.
BUT they would by my prediction still be categorically swinging in an opposite direction of where things had been, at some point. how far it will swing is also not exactly knowable, only that it does eventually beginning to swing back at some point.


The overly specific POV is what goes off the rails/don't make for particularly accurate predictions.
Keeping to a generalized understanding lets us be ready for changes rather than surprised by them, even if we can't say exactly what those will be.  The POV that things won't change any more is the POV that is ever surprised by the endless changes as well as the one POV that images to know to specifically what those changes would be.
 
2023-01-06 12:44:29 PM  
The motivations are different.   Back in the early union days they were fighting against barbaric working conditions, zero safety measures, child labor, no health benefits etc...

Gen Z:
https://youtu.be/oJ0SCBOQD48
 
2023-01-06 1:22:42 PM  

Marshmallow Jones: The motivations are different.   Back in the early union days they were fighting against barbaric working conditions, zero safety measures, child labor, no health benefits etc...

Gen Z:
https://youtu.be/oJ0SCBOQD48


"Things are better now than at the worst time in our history, certainly unions aren't needed anymore!"

Smrt you are
 
2023-01-06 2:11:07 PM  
Yes Gen Z workers, famous for hating rules, structure, and hierarchy, are going to really love working in union shops that rigidly enforce, via contract, rules, structure, and hierarchy.
 
2023-01-06 2:15:36 PM  

bostonguy: Lusiphur: remember in the late 90's and early 00's when everyone was convinced that thanks to demographics, Republicans would be a complete non-entity by this time?

The GOP would have become a non-entity if they had not fixed elections through gerrymandering, strict "voter fraud" laws, and other shenanigans.

Why do you think they do those things?


To whoever funnied that comment, I will add:

The GOP has not won the nationwide presidential popular vote since 2004 -- and that was during a war. The last time they won such a vote in peacetime was in 1988.
 
2023-01-06 3:03:14 PM  

Hyjamon: What until they here about things called "pensions"


Which were great unless you had a bad union pension.  For instance, my grandparent's pension that paid them about $100 or so a month in the 70s for the 90+ years in between the two of them.

Fano: TheGreatGazoo: Unions work great when the membership has their thumbs on the union bosses to do the right thing.

My former union used to tell us they had to figure out how to help management. Quite the "Partnership" they had there.


Ideally the unions and management work together, at least to some extent, and share in the profits.  If they are too much of a PITA, they can ruin a good thing.  I worked for a place in the 90s where the union guys started at $25/hr and went over $40/hr.  The union had negotiated everything down to include when sleeping on the job was acceptable (if you slumped over a desk it was accidental, if you were leaning back in your chair it was on purpose).  Many of them made over $100,000/year with overtime.  Today it's closed and those jobs are long gone.
 
2023-01-06 3:26:10 PM  

zgrizz: And they wonder why there are no jobs in America, and the few American made products cost an arm and a leg.

Youth does not convey intelligence.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2023-01-06 5:01:45 PM  

JK47: Yes Gen Z workers, famous for hating rules, structure, and hierarchy, are going to really love working in union shops that rigidly enforce, via contract, rules, structure, and hierarchy.


It's always nice when I get reminded of why my Farkies are what they are.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2023-01-06 5:54:21 PM  

TheGreatGazoo: Hyjamon: What until they here about things called "pensions"

Which were great unless you had a bad union pension.  For instance, my grandparent's pension that paid them about $100 or so a month in the 70s for the 90+ years in between the two of them.

Fano: TheGreatGazoo: Unions work great when the membership has their thumbs on the union bosses to do the right thing.

My former union used to tell us they had to figure out how to help management. Quite the "Partnership" they had there.

Ideally the unions and management work together, at least to some extent, and share in the profits.  If they are too much of a PITA, they can ruin a good thing.  I worked for a place in the 90s where the union guys started at $25/hr and went over $40/hr.  The union had negotiated everything down to include when sleeping on the job was acceptable (if you slumped over a desk it was accidental, if you were leaning back in your chair it was on purpose).  Many of them made over $100,000/year with overtime.  Today it's closed and those jobs are long gone.


I'm intrigued by the idea of the union having a required level of ownership in the company: Make it 20, 25% of voting stock, with a corresponding mandatory share of board seats.  If the union is unreasonable in demands and punishes the company, they are attacking their own financial interests.  Meanwhile, the company's service to the shareholders will be definition help the union.

One caveat would be to ban such ownership if the union is part of the one of the giant hydra-like organizations.  Don't want AFL-CIO owning a quarter of the farking economy.
 
2023-01-06 11:15:14 PM  
Unions wouldn't exsist if management was fair and decent. In a world where corporatism and late stage capitalism stack the deck against the workers, unions are the best defense.

Bumpinthenight, I had a similar background and called it a mink- lined leg-hold trap. I maxed out my pay, but couldn't find anything locally that paid better or had all the good stuff like great health care, deferred compensation, the pension, and annual cost of living bumps. Lucky for me, I loved my career and felt fully actualized in it the whole time, so when I retired it was a joyful experience. My pension is not ridiculously big but I can actually live in it.

My kids know about my career, but also, about my dad's. Dad was a great engineer, but all thru the eighties, he would work his ass off until just before he could get vested, and then that company would lay him off to cut costs, and he repeated that cycle, comany after company, falling farther behind on each lap, and losing health care each time, getting sicker each cycle, until one Saturday the security guard at the office found him slumped over his desk, trying to make a little more overtime.

Kids today don't want that to be their future.
 
2023-01-07 12:19:43 AM  

TDWCom29: The question is, why were previous generations not as pro-union? It's baffling


Two key factors. One: very aggressive anti-union propaganda.

Union Busting: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)
Youtube Gk8dUXRpoy8


Two: political leaders who were, at best, apathetic to the interests of the working class.

"The Democratic Party - and the progressive forces within it - have so much going for them. The GOP's economic vision has never been less popular with ordinary Americans, or more irrelevant to their material needs. The U.S. electorate is becoming less white, less racist, and less conservative with each passing year. Social conservatism has never had less appeal for American voters than it does today. The garish spectacle of the Trump-era Republican Party is turning the American suburbs - once a core part of the GOP coalition - purple and blue.

If the Democratic Party wasn't bleeding support from white working-class voters in its old labor strongholds, it would dominate our national politics. Understandably, Democratic partisans often blame their powerlessness on such voters - and the regressive racial views that led them out of Team Blue's tent. But as unions have declined across the Midwest, Democrats haven't just been losing white, working-class voters to revanchist Republicans - they've also been losing them to quiet evenings at home. The NBER study cited by McElwee found that right-to-work laws reduce voter turnout in presidential elections by 2 to 3 percent.

Further, the notion that grassroots organizing cannot make a non-woke white man prioritize his class interests over his racial resentments - and thus, that the Democratic Party's refusal to bolster union organizing was irrelevant to its failure to fend off Trump - is unsupportable. In 2008, labor invested a quarter-billion dollars into Barack Obama's election, allocating the bulk of those funds into burnishing the candidate's support among union voters in the Midwest. That year, unionized white men backed Obama by an 18 percent margin; while nonunionized ones went for John McCain by 16."

If right-to-work laws alone cost Democrats roughly 3.5 percent of a given state's vote share, how many votes has the party lost since 1978 by refusing to prioritize progressive labor reforms?

What kind of country would we live in today, if they hadn't?"

https://nymag.com/intelligencer/2018/01/democrats-paid-a-huge-price-for-letting-unions-die.html
 
2023-01-07 6:03:50 AM  
Just heard this song for the first time today.

Strawbs - Part Of The Union
Youtube qJYbFFFZwdE
 
2023-01-07 10:16:07 AM  

BumpInTheNight: Hyjamon: What until they here about things called "pensions"

You know what, pensions kind of suck.  Well hear me out here, pensions are usually setup to be most beneficial for someone who's spent their entire working life at the one place which is exceptionally rare these days. They do not benefit someone who only puts a few years into a place and then moves on, and they aren't attractive to someone who's been working for a decade or two and wants to now settle into an org that's pension based as their biggest benefit.

Plus there's pensions that are not as bullet proof as you'd hope, with corporate raiders looting the funds years later and literally robbing you of that promised benefit.  See what happened to Sears for instance.  Fark many years ago the sitting Conservative government of Canada literally raided the public sector pension fund to balance their budget.

Pensions can be amazing, but I think they need a re-work to be more protected and some how rebalanced so that it doesn't take 30+ freakin' years to get anything meaningful out of them.

/peace out
//public sector union member with a pension coming when he eventually retires


It's exceptionally rare these days BECAUSE there's no incentive to stay in one place for your entire career.  Bring back pensions and watch how fast that will change.   Why would a business offer to keep paying you for the rest of your life if you only work there for 5 or 10 years?  I only need 25 years at my job to get my full pension + union medical.
 
2023-01-07 11:50:08 AM  
I don't know if it was parenting, education, or peer influence, but someone somewhere did something very right when these kids were coming up. They give me real hope.
 
2023-01-07 12:13:38 PM  

Marshmallow Jones: The motivations are different.   Back in the early union days they were fighting against barbaric working conditions, zero safety measures, child labor, no health benefits etc...

Gen Z:
https://youtu.be/oJ0SCBOQD48


You didn't even watch the entire video did you? This young person, who is obviously not old enough to drink legally, does NOT merely work eight hours per day. He goes to school full-time. He looks very young and is ONLY scheduled on weekends. A college student would likely be scheduled on other days that he does not have classes. So, a college student might work Tuesdays and Thursdays also. In other words, he almost certainly is still in high school, that is, he is literally child labor. A high school student is in school five days a week for more than six hours per day. He has five classes with about an hour of homework per class per day. He has exams to study for - lots of them.

Every Starbucks is inexplicably packed during all open hours for some reason, but they are far worse on weekends. We've all witnessed how abusive some people are to retail employees when their non-fat, vegan, five shots caramel, three shots vanilla, iced mocha latte doesn't come out in under three minutes. As if that weren't enough, the teenager relates that the MANAGER of the g.d. establishment can't be bothered to come in during the busiest work hours and help keep the workers from being overwhelmed by a crush of customers.

Yet, you imagine that this teen, being driven to a breaking point, with classes, exams, abusive customers, and an (at best) apathetic employer is somehow grounds for mocking and belittling the teenager. Guess how I know that you are piece of sh_t?
 
2023-01-07 6:13:03 PM  

Metaluna Mutant: The Reagan revolution is finally trickling down to serfs versus billionaires & their cronies.

Remember class warfare is NOT rich against poor. It's the rich convincing the poor to fight each other.


Class warfare is the liquidation of the capital class, bourgeoisie, and lumpen-proletariat, leaving only the peasants and class conscious proles. The revolutionary vanguard must then lead the proles and peasants, as they lack sufficient revolutionary consciousness and are constantly in danger of falling to reaction. Realistically it requires the liquidation of 40-60% of the population. This is an ethical necessity.

/Reading the works of Romanian communists is a lot
 
2023-01-07 6:18:49 PM  

bostonguy: Lusiphur: remember in the late 90's and early 00's when everyone was convinced that thanks to demographics, Republicans would be a complete non-entity by this time?

The GOP would have become a non-entity if they had not fixed elections through gerrymandering, strict "voter fraud" laws, and other shenanigans.

Why do you think they do those things?


The senate gives lie to this idea.
 
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