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(Daily Record (UK))   Fifteen Scottish place names that are difficult to pronounce. Come for Ecclefechan, stay for Ae   (dailyrecord.co.uk) divider line
    More: Interesting, Town, Village, Scottish Borders, small village, Scotland, first glance, place names, easier names  
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1276 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Dec 2022 at 1:05 AM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



40 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-12-09 8:24:56 PM  
Article misses Strachan (pronounced as strawn), Finzean (pronounced as fing-in) and I'm pretty sure there are two Ruthvens, one of which is pronounced as riven, the other as ruth-ven.

Regarding Finzean, that's an incidence of the yogh character being turned into a "z" by the printing press. See also: Dalziel and Menzies.
 
2022-12-10 12:58:06 AM  
I would have gotten about seven of those right, and I used to study Scots Gaelic.  Some of those are on the order of "Featherstonehaugh" being pronounced "Fanshaw"...basically local slang.
 
2022-12-10 1:09:29 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-12-10 1:09:40 AM  
The only ones I need to know are Bunnahabhain, Bruichladdich, Laphroaig...
 
2022-12-10 1:11:26 AM  
stay for Ae

encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.comView Full Size
 
2022-12-10 1:31:21 AM  
Boring picture.

Was hoping to see some tatties & neeps.
 
2022-12-10 1:41:34 AM  

Madman drummers bummers: The only ones I need to know are Bunnahabhain, Bruichladdich, Laphroaig...


Ardbeg. Lagavulin. Did you know they're reopening Port Ellen?
 
2022-12-10 1:43:11 AM  
NINEv2: Did you know they're reopening Port Ellen?

Didn't know she'd closed up.
 
2022-12-10 1:46:05 AM  

The Third Man: I would have gotten about seven of those right, and I used to study Scots Gaelic.  Some of those are on the order of "Featherstonehaugh" being pronounced "Fanshaw"...basically local slang.


So their language is like my signature? Just ignore the annoying bits?
 
2022-12-10 1:50:48 AM  
I spent a week in Kilconquhar as a base while touristing around Scotland with family after graduating college. Wonderful little village, but I quite remember the pub people telling us it was "Kill-conk-err."
 
2022-12-10 2:01:20 AM  

NINEv2: Madman drummers bummers: The only ones I need to know are Bunnahabhain, Bruichladdich, Laphroaig...

Ardbeg. Lagavulin. Did you know they're reopening Port Ellen?


In 2019, I made plans with a friend to go to the Islay Festival the following year.

...that worked out great.
 
2022-12-10 2:01:53 AM  

puffy999: The Third Man: I would have gotten about seven of those right, and I used to study Scots Gaelic.  Some of those are on the order of "Featherstonehaugh" being pronounced "Fanshaw"...basically local slang.

So their language is like my signature? Just ignore the annoying bits?


Mine is so indecipherable when I try to use one of those electronic pads that I've taken to attempting to scribble 'wank' on them instead of writing my name. No one can tell the difference.
 
2022-12-10 2:20:42 AM  
I spent a few days in Embra back in 1993. I had a great time there, even if I did get the dates wrong for the Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo and missed it by a week!
 
2022-12-10 2:21:02 AM  
My time to shine!
 
2022-12-10 2:27:12 AM  
I am still (jokingly) convinced that there is no rhyme or reason to the pronunciation of Scottish and Irish names, that the locals were just f*cking around with the British. But their plan backfired because the British just accepted it and the Scottish and Irish are now stuck with all these weird pronunciations. It is the world's longest running joke.

;-)
 
2022-12-10 2:27:24 AM  
I stayed once in a Scottish village named "Raymond Luxury Yacht", but it was pronounced "Throat-warbler Mangrove".

The people there had extraordinarily large noses as well
 
2022-12-10 2:54:05 AM  
List fails without Penicuik, which is believe is pronounced "pennycook", and not "penis sick", which was my first attempt.
 
2022-12-10 2:59:22 AM  

Madman drummers bummers: The only ones I need to know are Bunnahabhain, Bruichladdich, Laphroaig...


I stayed in a hotel in Stirling which named  all its rooms after whiskies, so I asked them to tell me how to pronounce them all.

I've also been to those 3 distilleries.... Bowmore remains my favourite.
 
2022-12-10 3:09:05 AM  

focusthis: Was hoping to see some tatties


Would post some, but drew doesn't allow it anymore.
 
2022-12-10 3:17:40 AM  

Excelsior: stay for Ae


Ä?
 
2022-12-10 3:20:27 AM  
But where are the Firths of First through Third?
 
2022-12-10 3:21:47 AM  

Pert: List fails without Penicuik, which is believe is pronounced "pennycook", and not "penis sick", which was my first attempt.


Penis-wick
 
2022-12-10 3:58:48 AM  
Laphroaig is a tough one for American tongues.
 
2022-12-10 4:01:41 AM  

We Ate the Necco Wafers: Laphroaig is a tough one for American tongues.


I'm sure one of the locals will help you wrap your tongue around the hard bits.
 
2022-12-10 4:24:27 AM  

We Ate the Necco Wafers: Laphroaig is a tough one for American tongues.


I dunno, my tongue loves it.

Fark user imageView Full Size


/sober 5+ yrs
//but not sober enough to tour Scotland
 
2022-12-10 6:20:20 AM  
The Corries-The Portree Kid-live-Lyrics
Youtube pUaqkp2xMzY
 
2022-12-10 6:40:22 AM  
Fox hat
Youtube kb0kiiB3O-o
 
2022-12-10 7:15:32 AM  
How to Pronounce Scotch Whisky #1
Youtube jcQglJyNL0w
 
2022-12-10 7:29:40 AM  

iron de havilland: Article misses Strachan (pronounced as strawn), Finzean (pronounced as fing-in) and I'm pretty sure there are two Ruthvens, one of which is pronounced as riven, the other as ruth-ven.

Regarding Finzean, that's an incidence of the yogh character being turned into a "z" by the printing press. See also: Dalziel and Menzies.



The Caledonia Bank
Youtube m1832rkuNis
 
2022-12-10 7:30:17 AM  

Mock26: I am still (jokingly) convinced that there is no rhyme or reason to the pronunciation of Scottish and Irish names, that the locals were just f*cking around with the British. But their plan backfired because the British just accepted it and the Scottish and Irish are now stuck with all these weird pronunciations. It is the world's longest running joke.

;-)


1. The Scottish are British

2. Place names throughout Britain and Ireland come from many different languages, with Scottish place names being either rooted in Pictish, Gaelic or English/Scots (with the eastern parts a smatering of Norse). Each of those languages have their own pronunciation rules so that is why you get such odd place names. The same is true in England, where the difference in place name pronunciation comes predominantly from different language base.

3. Gaelic is just as foreign a language in Scotland as English, it was brought over during the Irish colonisation starting in the 5th century.
 
2022-12-10 8:17:28 AM  
I was told Edinburgh was pronounced "Auld Reekie."

The Gaidhlig (pronounced gah lik) names (for people, places, or words) are quite different from the Scots names, and then in Gaidhlig speaking regions, like the islands and highlands, every town has a different pronunciation or word for common things like food.

Pronunciation is very much a local thing.  Like your parents, if they don't want you to understand what they're saying, they can make that happen.  It's a power.  Strange a tourism writer wouldn't mention that.
 
2022-12-10 8:18:40 AM  
I worked with a guy who when he came to the US, spelled his last name "A". He changed it to "Ae", because he got tired of explaining that "A" WAS his last name, the whole thing.
 
2022-12-10 11:49:19 AM  
I remember when I was young my father (who was born in Scotland) would tell me the names of the towns he had visited that had the Gaelic 'CH' sound - Ecclefechan, Stralachland and my favourite, Auchtermuchty.
 
2022-12-10 12:06:30 PM  
They forgot about Tighnabruaich.
 
2022-12-10 4:23:23 PM  
Military brat, lived in Scotland in early 1960s: Edzell, Forfarshire (Now in Angus Dist.). Had a great time. Learned later that accents tend to "Stick" at about age 8-9. When we next transferred to HI, I had to go to speech therapy because no one could understand me. Sometimes, when I am excited or angry, the accent still comes back. It was a small base, so we had no school on Base at the time because reasons and Congress. and I went to a local "dame school" (uniform included a kilt, jacket, knee stockings, shirt and tie) "on the economy" in town. Every morning we sang "God Save the Queen." Mother never could understand the money, "Old Pence." ("How can a dollar have 240 pennies?" "Oh, for the love of God, Mary. It's not a dollar!") I don't remember much trouble pronouncing place names, though. Our street was called Turnagain Lane because when you entered it, you turned left and then almost immediately turned right. Very pragmatic.
 
2022-12-10 5:17:45 PM  

Norfolking Chance: Mock26: I am still (jokingly) convinced that there is no rhyme or reason to the pronunciation of Scottish and Irish names, that the locals were just f*cking around with the British. But their plan backfired because the British just accepted it and the Scottish and Irish are now stuck with all these weird pronunciations. It is the world's longest running joke.

;-)

1. The Scottish are British

2. Place names throughout Britain and Ireland come from many different languages, with Scottish place names being either rooted in Pictish, Gaelic or English/Scots (with the eastern parts a smatering of Norse). Each of those languages have their own pronunciation rules so that is why you get such odd place names. The same is true in England, where the difference in place name pronunciation comes predominantly from different language base.

3. Gaelic is just as foreign a language in Scotland as English, it was brought over during the Irish colonisation starting in the 5th century.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-12-10 7:37:59 PM  
List obviously fails without Edinburgh and Glasgow.
 
2022-12-10 7:46:27 PM  
The place that must not be named:  Scoonthorpe.

Other favs:

Bellend
shiatterton aka Shillington since Queen Vicky was invited to visit.
Dunwich (since Thatcher became Dame Thatcher, Dull witch)
places with Pic in the name
The Isle of Skye
The Scilly Islands (once spelled without the "c"
Slough
Pilkington
The Tridings of York
 
2022-12-11 3:13:50 AM  
I do know that over in Ireland their capital city's name is pronounced "FookenDoob-Lan"
 
2022-12-11 3:51:04 AM  

Gordon Bennett: puffy999: The Third Man: I would have gotten about seven of those right, and I used to study Scots Gaelic.  Some of those are on the order of "Featherstonehaugh" being pronounced "Fanshaw"...basically local slang.

So their language is like my signature? Just ignore the annoying bits?

Mine is so indecipherable when I try to use one of those electronic pads that I've taken to attempting to scribble 'wank' on them instead of writing my name. No one can tell the difference.


/I've literally drawn smiley faces, or in one case I just drew an approximately half inch horizontal line.  Worked fine.  System don't GAF
 
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