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(Big Think)   Someday, the Universe will lose the ability to form stars any longer. But it won't be because it ran out of hydrogen   (bigthink.com) divider line
    More: Weird, Galaxy, Hydrogen, Universe, Dark matter, Big Bang, Deuterium, Atom, Star  
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936 clicks; posted to STEM » on 09 Dec 2022 at 1:10 PM (8 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



17 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-12-09 1:00:21 PM  
Universal cooling
 
2022-12-09 1:13:44 PM  
I pronounce it like "hydrojen" but you guys do whatever.
 
2022-12-09 1:22:17 PM  
entropy is a biatch
 
2022-12-09 1:36:12 PM  
filmdaily.coView Full Size
 
2022-12-09 1:44:45 PM  
Big thunked
 
2022-12-09 1:48:55 PM  
If the universe didn't know how to make stars no more, what would you axe it?

/words of wisdom from the ODB
 
2022-12-09 2:11:38 PM  
I was wondering how often hydrogen gets created... and it's not often. Proton decay is rare. The closest is alpha decay, but that's the emission of helium rather than hydrogen.
 
2022-12-09 2:26:54 PM  

WelldeadLink: I was wondering how often hydrogen gets created... and it's not often. Proton decay is rare. The closest is alpha decay, but that's the emission of helium rather than hydrogen.


Free neutrons will decay into hydrogen after a few minutes.
 
2022-12-09 3:48:16 PM  

Ivo Shandor: WelldeadLink: I was wondering how often hydrogen gets created... and it's not often. Proton decay is rare. The closest is alpha decay, but that's the emission of helium rather than hydrogen.

Free neutrons will decay into hydrogen after a few minutes.


Okay, that must be happening pretty often at a planetary scale, but I don't know how it compares to a cosmological scale.
 
2022-12-09 4:07:08 PM  

WelldeadLink: Ivo Shandor: WelldeadLink: I was wondering how often hydrogen gets created... and it's not often. Proton decay is rare. The closest is alpha decay, but that's the emission of helium rather than hydrogen.

Free neutrons will decay into hydrogen after a few minutes.

Okay, that must be happening pretty often at a planetary scale, but I don't know how it compares to a cosmological scale.


Smaller.
 
2022-12-09 4:13:20 PM  
So that fart I smelled in the elevator earlier will no longer be part of the circle of life, let alone anything useful, billions of years from now, after it has broken down into air, liquid, gas, crops, craps, soil and the like for eons?
 
2022-12-09 4:16:13 PM  
How long are the stars it is currently forming?
 
2022-12-09 4:51:38 PM  

Tom Marvolo Bombadil: How long are the stars it is currently forming?


About this long.
 
2022-12-09 5:14:58 PM  
From an Isaac Asimov story:

And then there was light.

/I wouldn't worry too much about it
 
2022-12-09 5:23:54 PM  
Republicans are not worried. THere will always be oil and coal.
 
2022-12-09 6:19:57 PM  

Practical_Draconian: So that fart I smelled in the elevator earlier will no longer be part of the circle of life, let alone anything useful, billions of years from now, after it has broken down into air, liquid, gas, crops, craps, soil and the like for eons?


Anything on Earth is pretty tightly gravitationally bound to the planet and outside of that to the Sun, but some atmosphere gets blown off into space over time.  And as the Sun enters its red giant phase, pretty much the entire planet will be turned into a plasma and the solar wind might blow most of it out to the heliopause.  Once there, it's possible it will end up part of a new star-forming gas cloud and ultimately end up part of another planet.
 
DVD
2022-12-09 9:38:33 PM  
Of course, all of the timeline in the article are assuming that we haven't created these massive gravity mining mechanisms and drawn all of that hydrogen back into our localized galaxy for future use.

Or created swarms of Von Neumann machines that hunt down ALL matter and construct galactic entities for our use.

In that case, only proton decay might be a problem later on?
 
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