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(Futurity)   Cats have owned humans since the days of early farming   (futurity.org) divider line
    More: Interesting, Genetics, Genetic disorder, Mesopotamia, Cat genes, Fertile Crescent, Cat, DNA, Polycystic kidney disease  
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1353 clicks; posted to D'awww » and STEM » on 06 Dec 2022 at 7:19 AM (9 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



23 Comments     (+0 »)
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2022-12-06 5:32:05 AM  
Leslie A. Lyons, a feline geneticist

//giggle
 
2022-12-06 7:34:04 AM  
I thought this was common knowledge - kitties provided pest control, humans provided protection, each enjoyed the other's company, and that was that.
 
2022-12-06 7:52:38 AM  
> The researchers' new study finds this lifestyle transition [agriculture]  for humans was the catalyst that sparked the world's first domestication of cats

The study doesn't show that. People were  gathering wild grains and storing them for winter food before agriculture. They probably had rodent problems. Food storage was the catalyst .

> In a 2021 study, Lyons and colleagues found that the cat's genomic structure is more similar to humans than nearly any other non-primate mammal.

Maybe she should talk to real geneticists.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euarchontoglires
includes primates, rodents, rabbits, and some minor groups
 
2022-12-06 7:57:54 AM  
Tell yourself whatever you want. You're really just their host organism.
 
2022-12-06 8:13:53 AM  
The First Guy To Ever Own A Cat
Youtube H6leGvf6BeM
 
2022-12-06 8:19:28 AM  

Moooooo K: Tell yourself whatever you want. You're really just their host organism.


Toxoplasma gondii is laughing.
 
2022-12-06 8:36:20 AM  
IIRC, dogs were domesticated in several places around Eurasia by widely-separated groups of humans roughly contemporaneous with each other, and humans continued the practice with local canid populations everywhere they went. TFA suggests humans domesticated cats in just one location, then brought their pets with them as they migrated. Since all domestic cats are apparently descended from the African wildcat (and not from European or Asian wildcats), this does seem to be the case, but why that particular species?

Mesopotamia was not the first location where humans developed farming, and most of the other locations also had indigenous small felines. If this study is accurate, it seems the local felines were only domesticated (as far as any cats can be called 'domesticated') from a population group in Mesopotamia. Why just that region, and not the Indus Valley or Yangtse river civilizations which were contemporaries of (or predated) the Mesopotamian civilizations? Other farming cultures would have also benefited from the presence of cats, but they don't appear to have domesticated their local small felines.
 
2022-12-06 8:36:51 AM  

Moooooo K: Tell yourself whatever you want. You're really just their host organism.


Mando and Sophie agree

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2022-12-06 8:53:36 AM  
Cats domesticated themselves.

Warehouse full of grain attracts lots of mice and other rodents.
Lots of mice attracts cats, as cats eat rodents and not grain so humans are cool with this.
In the winter cats discover fireplaces.
 
2022-12-06 9:21:51 AM  

Wenchmaster: IIRC, dogs were domesticated in several places around Eurasia by widely-separated groups of humans roughly contemporaneous with each other, and humans continued the practice with local canid populations everywhere they went. TFA suggests humans domesticated cats in just one location, then brought their pets with them as they migrated. Since all domestic cats are apparently descended from the African wildcat (and not from European or Asian wildcats), this does seem to be the case, but why that particular species?

Mesopotamia was not the first location where humans developed farming, and most of the other locations also had indigenous small felines. If this study is accurate, it seems the local felines were only domesticated (as far as any cats can be called 'domesticated') from a population group in Mesopotamia. Why just that region, and not the Indus Valley or Yangtse river civilizations which were contemporaries of (or predated) the Mesopotamian civilizations? Other farming cultures would have also benefited from the presence of cats, but they don't appear to have domesticated their local small felines.


well maybe the others decided they were better for eating
 
2022-12-06 9:43:28 AM  
Dogs: Humans give me food and water, they must be gods.
Cats: Humans give me food and water, I must be a god.
 
2022-12-06 10:19:27 AM  
And thus we know what happened to the first house plant.
 
2022-12-06 10:36:05 AM  
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2022-12-06 10:39:13 AM  

Wenchmaster: If this study is accurate, it seems the local felines were only domesticated (as far as any cats can be called 'domesticated') from a population group in Mesopotamia. Why just that region, and not the Indus Valley or Yangtse river civilizations which were contemporaries of (or predated) the Mesopotamian civilizations?


Maybe other regions got cats from there, through trade or migration, before they thought to domesticate their own populations.
 
2022-12-06 10:49:53 AM  
Yes, science has found that humans began to domesticate the cat about 10,000 years ago.  Scientists have not given any estimates as to when the process will be complete.
 
2022-12-06 11:59:04 AM  
> In a 2021 study, Lyons and colleagues found that the cat's genomic structure is more similar to humans than nearly any other non-primate mammal.


OK, who's been farking the cats?

/you're either brave or stupid, but either way I'm impressed you were able to continue with a shredded groin
 
2022-12-06 1:12:53 PM  
They have it backwards. Cats domesticated humans, not the other way around. When gatherers stored wild grain, it attracted rodents aka cat food. The cats trained the humans to grow their own cat food-attracting human food.
 
2022-12-06 2:32:52 PM  
There are domesticated cats, but most are not.  Domestication implies a level of human control over which cats breed with each other, in order to select for the traits humans want most in the next generation.

For the most part, wild and/or outdoor cats select their own mates based on their own criteria.  It just so happens that the cats that find themselves most appealing to humans are the most likely to be provided food and shelter by said humans, and thus most likely to live to pass on genes to their offspring, ensuring that even the wild ones are not "that" wild.

This is very different from dogs, that don't really have wild breeding populations of significant size anymore, and the overwhelming majority of dogs that exist today were domesticated and selectively bred to be good at a specific set of tasks.
 
2022-12-06 2:42:49 PM  
The cat from tfa looks like my Cleo
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/your authority really isn't recognized in Fort Kickass.
 
2022-12-06 4:17:23 PM  

houginator: This is very different from dogs, that don't really have wild breeding populations of significant size anymore, and the overwhelming majority of dogs that exist today were domesticated and selectively bred to be good at a specific set of tasks.


That's a very Western-centric perspective.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free-ranging_dog
The global dog population is estimated to be 900 million,[3][4] of which around 20% are regarded as owned pets and therefore restrained.[5]

Most street or village dogs tend to be "yellow dogs"  looking like dingoes.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pye-dog
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// I knew a woman from Madagascar who thought it crazy that Americans allowed dogs in their homes because dogs are dirty street scavengers.
 
2022-12-06 6:49:51 PM  
images.fineartamerica.comView Full Size
 
2022-12-06 6:54:53 PM  

Ambitwistor: [Fark user image 359x473]



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2022-12-06 10:59:26 PM  
How long before somebody put lipstick on a cat's butt?
 
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