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(PC Magazine)   Nothing talking to carriers about US smartphone release. No word on who is talking to carriers   (pcmag.com) divider line
    More: Strange, Mobile phone, Smartphone, Windows Mobile, founder Carl Pei, IPhone, Motorola, American carriers, lot of additional technical support  
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659 clicks; posted to Business » on 05 Dec 2022 at 11:48 AM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



21 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-12-05 9:55:05 AM  
Third base.
 
2022-12-05 12:18:49 PM  
"carriers and their unique customizations that they need to make on top of Android"

They /need/ that, as in, a normal Android phone won't just work?

Oddly enough carriers here in Denmark doesn't need to do anything to Android for it to work.
 
2022-12-05 12:22:04 PM  
In related news:

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-12-05 12:27:43 PM  

Ketchuponsteak: "carriers and their unique customizations that they need to make on top of Android"

They /need/ that, as in, a normal Android phone won't just work?

Oddly enough carriers here in Denmark doesn't need to do anything to Android for it to work.


Yeah... the carrier has no reason to be involved. They provide a service, I install their SIM, and I use their data.

It sounds like their target is poor people who buy phones through the carrier and  finance them because they couldn't afford it otherwise.
 
2022-12-05 12:39:03 PM  

Izunbacol: Ketchuponsteak: "carriers and their unique customizations that they need to make on top of Android"

They /need/ that, as in, a normal Android phone won't just work?

Oddly enough carriers here in Denmark doesn't need to do anything to Android for it to work.

Yeah... the carrier has no reason to be involved. They provide a service, I install their SIM, and I use their data.

It sounds like their target is poor people who buy phones through the carrier and  finance them because they couldn't afford it otherwise.


I guess they want their app on the phone, which is fair enough I guess,

Locking it, or installing bloatware, not OK.
 
2022-12-05 12:39:22 PM  

Ketchuponsteak: "carriers and their unique customizations that they need to make on top of Android"

They /need/ that, as in, a normal Android phone won't just work?

Oddly enough carriers here in Denmark doesn't need to do anything to Android for it to work.


Yes, they need to make modifications like APN, SMS, LTE etc configuration and installing their carrier app with root privileges so they can run things like tcpdump.service.
 
2022-12-05 12:49:07 PM  
Nothing is a Chinese phone manufacturer, not quite Huawei/ZTE, but in case you haven't noticed, the big 3 have more or less eschewed chinese equipment...

https://www.politico.eu/article/us-to-ban-chinese-telecom-equipment-national-security-fears-huawei-zte/
 
2022-12-05 12:53:47 PM  
I should go back to making Android roms and poking the Verizon bear. I wish I had a picture of when I saw tcpdump running as a Verizon service on my Note 2. Or when they put that strange "your charger is not compatible with your phone" message on my phone. Or when they eventually upped the screen voltage (I assume ... it became super bright) and burned out the screen on that phone. That was an impressive and effective technique.

Fark user imageView Full Size


It changed my perception of the world.
 
2022-12-05 12:54:36 PM  

Elzar: Nothing is a Chinese phone manufacturer, not quite Huawei/ZTE, but in case you haven't noticed, the big 3 have more or less eschewed chinese equipment...

https://www.politico.eu/article/us-to-ban-chinese-telecom-equipment-national-security-fears-huawei-zte/


Nothing is founded by a Swedish national out of London.
 
2022-12-05 1:02:35 PM  

Elzar: Nothing is a Chinese phone manufacturer, not quite Huawei/ZTE, but in case you haven't noticed, the big 3 have more or less eschewed chinese equipment...

https://www.politico.eu/article/us-to-ban-chinese-telecom-equipment-national-security-fears-huawei-zte/


If it runs snoopware android its still nothing
 
2022-12-05 1:03:50 PM  

Wine Sipping Elitist: I should go back to making Android roms and poking the Verizon bear. I wish I had a picture of when I saw tcpdump running as a Verizon service on my Note 2. Or when they put that strange "your charger is not compatible with your phone" message on my phone. Or when they eventually upped the screen voltage (I assume ... it became super bright) and burned out the screen on that phone. That was an impressive and effective technique.

[Fark user image image 425x235]

It changed my perception of the world.


Android is on the pole
 
2022-12-05 1:08:44 PM  

Ketchuponsteak: Izunbacol: Ketchuponsteak: "carriers and their unique customizations that they need to make on top of Android"

They /need/ that, as in, a normal Android phone won't just work?

Oddly enough carriers here in Denmark doesn't need to do anything to Android for it to work.

Yeah... the carrier has no reason to be involved. They provide a service, I install their SIM, and I use their data.

It sounds like their target is poor people who buy phones through the carrier and  finance them because they couldn't afford it otherwise.

I guess they want their app on the phone, which is fair enough I guess,

Locking it, or installing bloatware, not OK.


Snoopware android comes free of charge
 
2022-12-05 1:09:53 PM  

Izunbacol: Ketchuponsteak: "carriers and their unique customizations that they need to make on top of Android"

They /need/ that, as in, a normal Android phone won't just work?

Oddly enough carriers here in Denmark doesn't need to do anything to Android for it to work.

Yeah... the carrier has no reason to be involved. They provide a service, I install their SIM, and I use their data.

It sounds like their target is poor people who buy phones through the carrier and  finance them because they couldn't afford it otherwise.


Carriers can block any brand phone they want
 
2022-12-05 1:12:22 PM  

Ketchuponsteak: "carriers and their unique customizations that they need to make on top of Android"

They /need/ that, as in, a normal Android phone won't just work?

Oddly enough carriers here in Denmark doesn't need to do anything to Android for it to work.


Cause merica is snoopin
 
2022-12-05 1:27:49 PM  

Linux_Yes: Ketchuponsteak: Izunbacol: Ketchuponsteak: "carriers and their unique customizations that they need to make on top of Android"

They /need/ that, as in, a normal Android phone won't just work?

Oddly enough carriers here in Denmark doesn't need to do anything to Android for it to work.

Yeah... the carrier has no reason to be involved. They provide a service, I install their SIM, and I use their data.

It sounds like their target is poor people who buy phones through the carrier and  finance them because they couldn't afford it otherwise.

I guess they want their app on the phone, which is fair enough I guess,

Locking it, or installing bloatware, not OK.

Snoopware android comes free of charge


Indeed. Its amusing to me when people are worried that Huawei is spying on them. Like, duh, what do they think Android is doing?
 
2022-12-05 1:30:13 PM  

Linux_Yes: Ketchuponsteak: "carriers and their unique customizations that they need to make on top of Android"

They /need/ that, as in, a normal Android phone won't just work?

Oddly enough carriers here in Denmark doesn't need to do anything to Android for it to work.

Cause merica is snoopin


I have a Huawei phone, the P30 pro., damned good phone, keeping it till it breaks. And the number of entities that's supposedly spying on me is quite staggering. ;P
 
2022-12-05 1:32:39 PM  

Ketchuponsteak: "carriers and their unique customizations that they need to make on top of Android"

They /need/ that, as in, a normal Android phone won't just work?

Oddly enough carriers here in Denmark doesn't need to do anything to Android for it to work.


Every carrier in the US installs or replaces some of the OEM software on Android with their own. That's why Verizon customers don't have their contacts synced off their phone by default or why every Sprint phone had a farking NASCAR app on it.

95% of Android users don't know this happens, but it's a huge reason why the Android user experience is so immensely personal to any given device. My Galaxy S20 on TMobile is very different from someone else's on ATT because of carrier activation BS.
 
2022-12-05 1:56:13 PM  

likefunbutnot: Ketchuponsteak: "carriers and their unique customizations that they need to make on top of Android"

They /need/ that, as in, a normal Android phone won't just work?

Oddly enough carriers here in Denmark doesn't need to do anything to Android for it to work.

Every carrier in the US installs or replaces some of the OEM software on Android with their own. That's why Verizon customers don't have their contacts synced off their phone by default or why every Sprint phone had a farking NASCAR app on it.

95% of Android users don't know this happens, but it's a huge reason why the Android user experience is so immensely personal to any given device. My Galaxy S20 on TMobile is very different from someone else's on ATT because of carrier activation BS.


Ok... walk me through this.

You buy your phone. You don't get it as one of those locked bullshiat deals through the carrier, but you walk into the store (is there a Samsung Store?  Motorola Store?  Amazon?) and buy it in a box.

You put the carrier's SIM in there.

Do they force you to wipe it and install the carrier's backup image on the device?  What if you have a Verizon phone and you move over to T-Mobile?  Is it still loaded with Verizon stuff, or does T-Mobile force you to install their version?

/iPhone user, so this all feels very foreign.
 
2022-12-05 1:58:22 PM  

likefunbutnot: Ketchuponsteak: "carriers and their unique customizations that they need to make on top of Android"

They /need/ that, as in, a normal Android phone won't just work?

Oddly enough carriers here in Denmark doesn't need to do anything to Android for it to work.

Every carrier in the US installs or replaces some of the OEM software on Android with their own. That's why Verizon customers don't have their contacts synced off their phone by default or why every Sprint phone had a farking NASCAR app on it.

95% of Android users don't know this happens, but it's a huge reason why the Android user experience is so immensely personal to any given device. My Galaxy S20 on TMobile is very different from someone else's on ATT because of carrier activation BS.


The carrier app that lets you check how much data you have used, gives you access to change plans and similar, wouldn't be so horrible to have installed.

But, its something the consumer can easily install themselves. So for that reason I assume any customisation the carrier does to the phone is detrimental to the experience, since they can't rely on customers doing it out of their own free will.

I guess I am lucky to live in a small country, where the carriers aren't able to exercise that amount of control.
 
2022-12-05 2:03:05 PM  

Ketchuponsteak: Linux_Yes: Ketchuponsteak: Izunbacol: Ketchuponsteak: "carriers and their unique customizations that they need to make on top of Android"

They /need/ that, as in, a normal Android phone won't just work?

Oddly enough carriers here in Denmark doesn't need to do anything to Android for it to work.

Yeah... the carrier has no reason to be involved. They provide a service, I install their SIM, and I use their data.

It sounds like their target is poor people who buy phones through the carrier and  finance them because they couldn't afford it otherwise.

I guess they want their app on the phone, which is fair enough I guess,

Locking it, or installing bloatware, not OK.

Snoopware android comes free of charge

Indeed. Its amusing to me when people are worried that Huawei is spying on them. Like, duh, what do they think Android is doing?


It proves the old saying: ignorance is bliss
 
2022-12-05 2:27:56 PM  

Izunbacol: Do they force you to wipe it and install the carrier's backup image on the device?  What if you have a Verizon phone and you move over to T-Mobile?  Is it still loaded with Verizon stuff, or does T-Mobile force you to install their version?


There is a SIM activation process for any carrier. On Android, this process includes the installation of carrier-mandated applications. These can be third-party applications or replacements for existing software. The software is installed while the SIM is activated. There is no way around this. It's not a wipe. It's just that extra stuff gets installed and defaults can be changed.

Verizon is my poster child for this, because their contacts application is forced on every Android user and by default it does not sync your contacts back to anything else, leading to millions of users who lose their contacts when they switch phones because they didn't know they're using Verizon's stupid contacts app instead of Google's.

Android is actually a bit more confusing than that. There is a standard set of applications that comes from AOSP (Android Open Source Project), which can be replaced by applications from Google (i.e. what most people would call the "standard" versions) or from the device OEM... which can be replaced by the carrier during the SIM activation process. The carrier activation process may also change the phone's home screen and potentially even the standard launcher (the phone's UI). The Carrier, Phone OEM and Google ALL have administrative authority to do this, and they can all mark applications as essential operating system software but the good news is that Android gives users the ability to disable, uninstall or set as default anything they goddamned well please once activation is done. It's just knowing what happens in the first place that's tricky.

The reason it isn't as simple as switch SIMs and go is that carriers in the US have decided to monetize app installs from partnerships with software companies or because they want a standard application for their own support processes, even if that application is in every other way clearly deficient (such as the Verizon Contacts app, which, once again, is criminally bad software). Apple forbids this, but Apple forbids goddamned near everything that isn't the perfect one true Apple way of doing things.
 
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