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(MSN)   Every employee is now a free agent, playing employers off against each other to boost their salaries   (msn.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Employment, current employer, best companies, new job, get-go, normal job market, free agency, past year  
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1036 clicks; posted to Business » on 29 Nov 2022 at 5:35 AM (8 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



26 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-11-29 3:56:07 AM  
Don't whine at me boss. If you wanted to keep us, you'd have preserved pensions instead of forcing us onto the 401(k) thing.
 
2022-11-29 5:45:23 AM  
F*ck you, pay me
 
2022-11-29 6:23:31 AM  
Offer only valid for those who can stand up and fight for themselves. A lot of people just don't know how or are too scared. And that's who they are. They still should not get screwed over.
 
2022-11-29 6:42:54 AM  
The only way to get a decent raise at some companies is to leave and then come back. Raises are handed out from a bucket, there's a cap, and giving you more takes from someone else. Raises are like 3% to 5%, barely keep up with inflation, so eventually you're making LESS money than when you started. If you haven't received a 10% raise in the past 2 years, you're making less money each year.

We call them boomerangs. They leave for 6 months to work somewhere for a higher salary then come back to the company for an even higher salary, or at least higher than they used to make. It seems risky, but worth it.
 
2022-11-29 6:45:09 AM  
Gogo bar protocol:
You pay me money, I will do things for you. If you want me to pretend I'm emotionally invested, it will cost you extra.

Me love you long time.
 
2022-11-29 6:57:14 AM  

edmo: Don't whine at me boss. If you wanted to keep us, you'd have preserved pensions instead of forcing us onto the 401(k) thing.


Now imagine where we'd be if we decoupled healthcare from the job market.
 
2022-11-29 7:06:53 AM  
I've never worked at a place where I would have trusted the leadership to keep me employed after indicating I could leave, and that's having worked with direct managers that were good people.

If you're going to start looking for a job to use as leverage for more money, negotiate with the new employer and be ready to leave. Don't be attached to your workplace.
 
2022-11-29 7:08:48 AM  

Wine Sipping Elitist: The only way to get a decent raise at some companies is to leave and then come back. Raises are handed out from a bucket, there's a cap, and giving you more takes from someone else. Raises are like 3% to 5%, barely keep up with inflation, so eventually you're making LESS money than when you started. If you haven't received a 10% raise in the past 2 years, you're making less money each year.

We call them boomerangs. They leave for 6 months to work somewhere for a higher salary then come back to the company for an even higher salary, or at least higher than they used to make. It seems risky, but worth it.


And that works out long-term?

Because I had this pattern a few times: I quit, tell the boss I have a new job that pays better, box asks how much, I tell him (maybe he'll pay me a little more and I can stay?), and the boss shrugs and lets me leave.

When I biatched about this to friends, I was pointed to studies saying that employees that are offered more money for staying are often gone six months later.
Either because they themselves realise that more money didn't solve their problems in that company, or because someone in the chain of command grows resentful of having been "blackmailed" into paying more than this employee was worth, and finds ways of dropping them.

So, do the boomerangs actually stay longer than six months when they return?
 
2022-11-29 7:09:20 AM  
At our place, they had to raise the starting hourly pay a good bit to get new employees. This led to some of the current employees pitching a huge fit. Probably helps there is a union back there. As a result, they went through the entire roster and doled out 7-20% raises based on time with company and value etc. Called it decompressing wages. Works for me. Best boost I've ever gotten.
 
2022-11-29 7:18:41 AM  
Employers, not surprisingly, hate that people are using job offers as bargaining chips. If you weren't serious, hiring managers are complaining, you shouldn't have wasted our time. And the bosses scrambling to put together counteroffers are grumbling: Where's the loyalty?

2011 called, you ignorant farkstains. Remember when you turned me down for a $9 an hour bookkeeping job because you wanted someone on the CPA path? I do. I've changed jobs twice in 2 years and gotten a raise each time AND got hired within a week of sending out resumes.
 
2022-11-29 7:27:40 AM  
This is only presented as a problem because it's benefitting workers and not companies.

Now that workers have some power (not enough) everything is negative, from them leaving a company and not having "loyalty" to demanding work/life balance and crazy things like working from home to working against companies to get higher wages.

The horror!
 
2022-11-29 7:29:04 AM  
MPOW - Didn't/couldn't give everyone across the board raises.  So they figured out which third of the employees they really needed and went on a title inflation spree.  "You're an Architect! And you're and Architect! And you're a Senior Staff Engineer!"  This backfired because while these newly title-inflated folks got a raise out of the deal... the new title meant they could play for even more in the market.
 
2022-11-29 7:34:35 AM  
I'm sorry boss, I have stakeholders to answer to and I am obliged to maximise my returns to them. As such you need to make sacrifices or I walk.

/Loyalty is a double edged sword
//You show me none and I will show you none
 
2022-11-29 7:40:15 AM  
Capitalsim's version of "but not like that."
 
2022-11-29 7:43:29 AM  

Creidiki: Gogo bar protocol:
You pay me money, I will do things for you. If you want me to pretend I'm emotionally invested, it will cost you extra.

Me love you long time.


Gogol Bordello - Wonderlust King (Official Video)
Youtube K3SUPPeuRdU

Gogol Bordello protocol: be a wunderlust king
 
2022-11-29 7:50:06 AM  
Hasn't it always been this way, at least for people with some sort of skills?
 
2022-11-29 7:53:03 AM  
bosses scrambling to put together counteroffers are grumbling: Where's the loyalty?


Fark user imageView Full Size


I think you'll find the "loyalty" in the same place you put the pensions.
 
2022-11-29 7:56:36 AM  
I'm here for the bennies and 6 weeks of vacation time.
 
2022-11-29 8:00:13 AM  
That's not so much "free agency" like what Uber likes to call employees and more of standard negotiations.

Go on tell your boss you want to be a free agent. Do it. Do it farker.
 
2022-11-29 8:17:50 AM  
And the bosses scrambling to put together counteroffers are grumbling: Where's the loyalty?


Hahaha, fark you.
 
2022-11-29 9:15:31 AM  

danny_kay: Wine Sipping Elitist: The only way to get a decent raise at some companies is to leave and then come back. Raises are handed out from a bucket, there's a cap, and giving you more takes from someone else. Raises are like 3% to 5%, barely keep up with inflation, so eventually you're making LESS money than when you started. If you haven't received a 10% raise in the past 2 years, you're making less money each year.

We call them boomerangs. They leave for 6 months to work somewhere for a higher salary then come back to the company for an even higher salary, or at least higher than they used to make. It seems risky, but worth it.

And that works out long-term?

Because I had this pattern a few times: I quit, tell the boss I have a new job that pays better, box asks how much, I tell him (maybe he'll pay me a little more and I can stay?), and the boss shrugs and lets me leave.

When I biatched about this to friends, I was pointed to studies saying that employees that are offered more money for staying are often gone six months later.
Either because they themselves realise that more money didn't solve their problems in that company, or because someone in the chain of command grows resentful of having been "blackmailed" into paying more than this employee was worth, and finds ways of dropping them.

So, do the boomerangs actually stay longer than six months when they return?


I gave my notice in June of last year and was offered an additional $12k (matching what my new employer had offered) to stay. I did, got another $6k raise and larger bonus this summer, and I'm still here so far, so there's one anecdote for you.

I think they realized they were undervaluing me and adjusted appropriately. They're playing a pretty long game if they're still planning on dropping me for my antics 17 months ago.
 
2022-11-29 9:28:38 AM  
The ONLY way to get a raise in America is to switch companies.  Unless you're an executive, of course, in which case you get the raises that the workers would normally have gotten.
 
2022-11-29 9:47:42 AM  
I left my job in July of last year. Did some work as a contractor and came back to the same company in a different role a year later. I ended up in a less stressful, more impactful position making ~$10k more a year than what I had when I quit. A lot of the issues I had with the company are minimized in this role and I still work with a great group of people.

The same philosophy was true at my previous company too, they loved hiring engineers fresh out of school, underpaying them, and just seeing what happened in three years. For the most part, they either promoted up (and got paid) or they moved on. I definitely saw boomerangs there, particularly in the more rural plants, where the labor pool was pretty shallow.
 
2022-11-29 10:10:14 AM  
I just ask for bonuses to compensate for the unsatisfactory salary increase. It's worked so far. My manager has more room to work with on bonuses than for salaries.

I'm privileged to have my manager though.
 
2022-11-29 10:19:20 AM  

Glorious Golden Ass: Capitalsim's version of "but not like that."


It's no different price gouging. Demanding the maximum compensation for the exact labor because supply is constrained.

And that's fine. That's good actually - it allocated resources in the best way, and creates new supply (e.g. people get training and credentials, and pursue employment within industries that are in short supply. Eventually it levels out.

If you have a short supply commodity, whether it's labor, housing, goods, or services, you should charge as much as you can for it. To charge anything less is lowering the reward for creating new supply, and screwing over the entire competitive market by creating and sustaining shortages.
 
2022-11-29 3:43:24 PM  
Management has spent over a century thoroughly establishing the fact that if they wake up one morning and think "I bet I can make an extra penny this quarter if I fire someone", that someone won't even get to finish that day's shift.

Then they act all surprised when there's no loyalty as they spend all day every day soaking the bridge in gasoline so they can blame others when it burns.
 
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