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(Amazon)   If you were the type to get emotional when the mars rovers finished their mission, grab the tissues before starting this. If you were not the type, watch this and get back to us when you've dried your eyes and changed your snot covered shirt   (amazon.com) divider line
    More: Cool, Mars Exploration Rover, NASA, Mars, Rover, Opportunity rover, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Human, Space exploration  
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2748 clicks; posted to STEM » and Entertainment » on 29 Nov 2022 at 4:45 AM (8 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



26 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-11-28 8:45:21 PM  
I'm not crying... you're crying! Well done! Hell of a mission.
 
2022-11-28 8:51:35 PM  
I just hope those engineers are exceedingly proud of themselves.
 
2022-11-28 10:42:42 PM  
Well that was emotionally manipulative.

And wonderful
 
2022-11-29 5:45:36 AM  
Just recently I was thinking how much we have learned about Mars and the solar system in my rather ag'ed lifeold (61) l When I was a young kid, people could still theorize about actual Martians. (I do miss that part though). The Sands of Mars was one of the first Sci Fi books I read.
 
2022-11-29 5:51:43 AM  

hegelsghost: Just recently I was thinking how much we have learned about Mars and the solar system in my rather ag'ed lifeold (61) l When I was a young kid, people could still theorize about actual Martians. (I do miss that part though). The Sands of Mars was one of the first Sci Fi books I read.


I have vague memories of watching Ray Bradburry's 'The Martian Chronicles' on television when I was young.
 
2022-11-29 5:56:39 AM  
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2022-11-29 6:00:58 AM  
An hour 44? Fark that shiat.
 
2022-11-29 6:35:08 AM  
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2022-11-29 6:57:07 AM  

ArcadianRefugee: An hour 44? Fark that shiat.


Honestly it's worth it.

Yeah, there are some eye rolling moments for those of us into the science but there's some really cool bits too.  I got a kick out of the 16 year old intern who was in the control room during the landings who got her degree and joined the team for real near the end of opportunity's mission, and seeing Squyers get choked up about the maps used for initial planning showed just how much he cared.
 
2022-11-29 7:18:50 AM  
Ikea "Lamp" Commercial - Hi Res
Youtube dBqhIVyfsRg
 
2022-11-29 7:44:43 AM  
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Gets me everytime.
 
2022-11-29 7:46:09 AM  

hegelsghost: Just recently I was thinking how much we have learned about Mars and the solar system in my rather ag'ed lifeold (61) l When I was a young kid, people could still theorize about actual Martians. (I do miss that part though). The Sands of Mars was one of the first Sci Fi books I read.


It was sixty-six years from when the Wright brothers enjoyed their first free, controlled flight of a power-driven, heavier-than-air plane, to when Neil Armstrong first stepped out onto the Moon's surface.

We completed our first fully successful soft landing on Mars just seven years later, and then, the very next year, launched the first man-made object to eventually leave our solar system. We've gained so much information about not just our solar system, but the Universe, in such a short amount of time, and yet it's such an infinitesimal fraction of what we can learn.

We're so close to completing the childhood promises of all of this - a colony on another planet - in my lifetime.
 
2022-11-29 7:46:57 AM  

espiaboricua: [Fark user image 639x862]

[Fark user image 735x1239]


Came to say something like this... leaving very satisfied.

/it will be returned one day and take a place of honor.
 
2022-11-29 7:50:14 AM  

FormlessOne: We're so close to completing the childhood promises of all of this - a colony on another planet - in my lifetime.


Yeah, but until we stop measuring it solely in monetary terms, we ain't going anywhere.
 
2022-11-29 8:13:14 AM  
I was trying to find the cartoon where Curiosity comes to greet Opportunity that is a little different than  

espiaboricua: [Fark user image 639x862]

[Fark user image 735x1239]

Instead this one was sad
images.squarespace-cdn.comView Full Size
 
2022-11-29 8:37:29 AM  

FormlessOne: hegelsghost: Just recently I was thinking how much we have learned about Mars and the solar system in my rather ag'ed lifeold (61) l When I was a young kid, people could still theorize about actual Martians. (I do miss that part though). The Sands of Mars was one of the first Sci Fi books I read.

It was sixty-six years from when the Wright brothers enjoyed their first free, controlled flight of a power-driven, heavier-than-air plane, to when Neil Armstrong first stepped out onto the Moon's surface.

We completed our first fully successful soft landing on Mars just seven years later, and then, the very next year, launched the first man-made object to eventually leave our solar system. We've gained so much information about not just our solar system, but the Universe, in such a short amount of time, and yet it's such an infinitesimal fraction of what we can learn.

We're so close to completing the childhood promises of all of this - a colony on another planet - in my lifetime.


Unfortunately the person closest to achieving that is more interested in turning a social network into a safe haven for Nazis.
 
2022-11-29 8:45:23 AM  

Tyrone Slothrop: FormlessOne: hegelsghost: Just recently I was thinking how much we have learned about Mars and the solar system in my rather ag'ed lifeold (61) l When I was a young kid, people could still theorize about actual Martians. (I do miss that part though). The Sands of Mars was one of the first Sci Fi books I read.

It was sixty-six years from when the Wright brothers enjoyed their first free, controlled flight of a power-driven, heavier-than-air plane, to when Neil Armstrong first stepped out onto the Moon's surface.

We completed our first fully successful soft landing on Mars just seven years later, and then, the very next year, launched the first man-made object to eventually leave our solar system. We've gained so much information about not just our solar system, but the Universe, in such a short amount of time, and yet it's such an infinitesimal fraction of what we can learn.

We're so close to completing the childhood promises of all of this - a colony on another planet - in my lifetime.

Unfortunately the person closest to achieving that is more interested in turning a social network into a safe haven for Nazis.


naw, he just keeps standing in front of the people who are closest to achieving that.
 
2022-11-29 9:26:32 AM  
We are never going to live in space, or on another planet.

I know some of you have stars in your eyes and hope in your heart and believe that with enough sciencing and smart people, we can do it, but I'm telling you it will never happen. Not in our lifetimes. Probably not in our grandchildrens' lifetimes.

We can't even figure out how to live on Earth without f#cking it all up. And we're going to try to live on a planet that can't sustain us outside of a dome? We're going to make Mars habitable? Give me a break. Even if we somehow made the whole of Mars capable of sustaining human life, and the lives of the various flora and fauna we require to survive, we still wouldn't do it because the cost of it would be ridiculously oppressive. We're in a country where we're still fighting to make sure everyone has a roof over their head, food in their bellies, and access to the medications they need to survive because 1/3 of the population doesn't want to let the rest of us chip in and make things like that accessible and free to those in need... And we're going to send a bunch of people to live on Mars on the public dime? Even if it's on private funds, it's not going to happen unless there's a  really lucrative mining colony and the investors can make more money than they put into it.

We can't even agree to save our own planet from climate change, and we're going to actively terraform another? Yeah, right.

It's a dream. It's not going to happen, even if we could make it happen. Humanity doesn't have its shiat together enough to stop blowing each other up, and we're going to stick some humans on an isolated planet together? They'd split off into tribes in one month, and they'd be at war with each other by the end of the year.

We need to work on ourselves, on our own planet, and our own challenges here on Earth. There are plenty of currently-uninhabitable biomes right here on this planet. Let's conquer those, and our own selfishness as a species, before we take the act to another planet.

The first colonists in space will die as a result of their experiment. We're just not ready-- philosophically, ideologically, or emotionally-- as a species to do anything like this without it becoming a total clusterf#ck.

The day we all live in harmony on Earth, all have health care, food, water, shelter, and protection from the 1/3 of the species who would seek to harm the rest of us..? That's the day we can start thinking about living on other planets, and not a moment before.
 
2022-11-29 9:33:18 AM  

WilderKWight: We are never going to live in space, or on another planet.

I know some of you have stars in your eyes and hope in your heart and believe that with enough sciencing and smart people, we can do it, but I'm telling you it will never happen. Not in our lifetimes. Probably not in our grandchildrens' lifetimes.


You don't know that.
"Fifteen hundred years ago everybody knew the Earth was the center of the universe. Five hundred years ago, everybody knew the Earth was flat, and fifteen minutes ago, you knew that humans were alone on this planet."

Every year we leap to new technologies we never knew we could do.
New discoveries, planets we didn't know could exist.
Take your eyore and go home because it's a big universe and anything could happen at any time.
 
2022-11-29 10:56:42 AM  
Humanity has already doomed itself.

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(The Ray Cat Solution)
 
2022-11-29 1:34:46 PM  

Zombie DJ: WilderKWight: We are never going to live in space, or on another planet.

I know some of you have stars in your eyes and hope in your heart and believe that with enough sciencing and smart people, we can do it, but I'm telling you it will never happen. Not in our lifetimes. Probably not in our grandchildrens' lifetimes.

You don't know that.
"Fifteen hundred years ago everybody knew the Earth was the center of the universe. Five hundred years ago, everybody knew the Earth was flat, and fifteen minutes ago, you knew that humans were alone on this planet."

Every year we leap to new technologies we never knew we could do.
New discoveries, planets we didn't know could exist.
Take your eyore and go home because it's a big universe and anything could happen at any time.


the problem isn't with the technology - the problem is with the user.
 
2022-11-29 1:49:07 PM  

WilderKWight: We are never going to live in space, or on another planet.

I know some of you have stars in your eyes and hope in your heart and believe that with enough sciencing and smart people, we can do it, but I'm telling you it will never happen. Not in our lifetimes. Probably not in our grandchildrens' lifetimes.

We can't even figure out how to live on Earth without f#cking it all up. And we're going to try to live on a planet that can't sustain us outside of a dome? We're going to make Mars habitable? Give me a break. Even if we somehow made the whole of Mars capable of sustaining human life, and the lives of the various flora and fauna we require to survive, we still wouldn't do it because the cost of it would be ridiculously oppressive. We're in a country where we're still fighting to make sure everyone has a roof over their head, food in their bellies, and access to the medications they need to survive because 1/3 of the population doesn't want to let the rest of us chip in and make things like that accessible and free to those in need... And we're going to send a bunch of people to live on Mars on the public dime? Even if it's on private funds, it's not going to happen unless there's a  really lucrative mining colony and the investors can make more money than they put into it.

We can't even agree to save our own planet from climate change, and we're going to actively terraform another? Yeah, right.

It's a dream. It's not going to happen, even if we could make it happen. Humanity doesn't have its shiat together enough to stop blowing each other up, and we're going to stick some humans on an isolated planet together? They'd split off into tribes in one month, and they'd be at war with each other by the end of the year.

We need to work on ourselves, on our own planet, and our own challenges here on Earth. There are plenty of currently-uninhabitable biomes right here on this planet. Let's conquer those, and our own selfishness as a species, before we take the act to ...


"Never" is a big claim. To be sure there are all kinds of engineering issues that are not resolved, and there is also the possibility that we will soon be entering a new dark age (see change, climate) and there is also the lack of political will to do any of this. But given all of this, imagine if NASA was funded continuously at the same level as it was in the 1960s. We would have colonies on Mars by now (underground, as everwhere else is toxic with radiation)
 
2022-11-29 3:44:17 PM  

WilderKWight: We are never going to live in space, or on another planet.

I know some of you have stars in your eyes and hope in your heart and believe that with enough sciencing and smart people, we can do it, but I'm telling you it will never happen. Not in our lifetimes. Probably not in our grandchildrens' lifetimes.

We can't even figure out how to live on Earth without f#cking it all up. And we're going to try to live on a planet that can't sustain us outside of a dome? We're going to make Mars habitable? Give me a break. Even if we somehow made the whole of Mars capable of sustaining human life, and the lives of the various flora and fauna we require to survive, we still wouldn't do it because the cost of it would be ridiculously oppressive. We're in a country where we're still fighting to make sure everyone has a roof over their head, food in their bellies, and access to the medications they need to survive because 1/3 of the population doesn't want to let the rest of us chip in and make things like that accessible and free to those in need... And we're going to send a bunch of people to live on Mars on the public dime? Even if it's on private funds, it's not going to happen unless there's a  really lucrative mining colony and the investors can make more money than they put into it.

We can't even agree to save our own planet from climate change, and we're going to actively terraform another? Yeah, right.

It's a dream. It's not going to happen, even if we could make it happen. Humanity doesn't have its shiat together enough to stop blowing each other up, and we're going to stick some humans on an isolated planet together? They'd split off into tribes in one month, and they'd be at war with each other by the end of the year.

We need to work on ourselves, on our own planet, and our own challenges here on Earth. There are plenty of currently-uninhabitable biomes right here on this planet. Let's conquer those, and our own selfishness as a species, before we take the act to ...


You must be a delight at parties!
 
2022-11-29 7:38:01 PM  
Opportunity is the hero to every overworked data person.

Do your job every day, exceeding expectations and you'll get nothing.

But at least it got to send a snarky message on the day it quit.
 
2022-11-29 8:26:29 PM  
I'm waiting for the sequel
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2022-11-29 10:02:00 PM  
Thanks fark, for turning me on to this. I'm a 1/3 in. This is real life WALL-E.
This is great.
 
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