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(iFixIt.com)   Repairing a fridge costs more than buying one new   (ifixit.com) divider line
    More: Murica, Federal Trade Commission, Refrigerator, Ice, Error code, repair instructions, Motor Vehicle Owners' Right to Repair Act, proprietary manufacturer software, repair community  
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1443 clicks; posted to Business » on 29 Nov 2022 at 12:50 AM (8 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-11-28 7:24:34 PM  
The Nerds: Broken Fridge - SNL
Youtube SSe6yxKy4r8
 
2022-11-28 8:51:16 PM  
Either make the information more readily available or suck up the cost of disposal.
 
2022-11-28 8:57:30 PM  
Check YouTube before you start troubleshooting or buying parts. Sometimes that one of a kind part that isn't made anymore can be replaced with a commodity part and a lil bit of sweat equity. Also once you have part numbers for the bits you need check Amazon as they usually ship faster for a much lower cost than dedicated appliance repair sites.
 
2022-11-28 8:59:07 PM  
Refrigerators don't need microchips.
 
2022-11-28 9:05:42 PM  
I have replaced our kitchen fridge two times, three if you count replacing the kitchen fridge we inherited, in the last 20 some odd years. Our garage refrigerator from the late 1960s will outlive us all.
 
2022-11-28 9:39:50 PM  
media0.giphy.comView Full Size
 
2022-11-28 10:21:36 PM  

fragMasterFlash: Check YouTube before you start troubleshooting or buying parts. Sometimes that one of a kind part that isn't made anymore can be replaced with a commodity part and a lil bit of sweat equity.


My 3 year old fridge's in-door ice make stopped working. I was prepared to replace the ice maker or even the whole door. A moderately deep dive on youtube revealed that the trouble was the wire harness that ran from the fridge to the door; the wires inside would fatigue and break. A light, the control panel, the ice maker, anything that ran off the door was subject to failure. The problem was that you couldn't just get a wire harness replacement and quick-disconnect the line in place.  So I found the broken wires and jump-spliced them using a crimp connector.  A $3 repair with a 7-hour learning curve solution.
 
2022-11-29 12:07:56 AM  

fragMasterFlash: Check YouTube before you start troubleshooting or buying parts. Sometimes that one of a kind part that isn't made anymore can be replaced with a commodity part and a lil bit of sweat equity. Also once you have part numbers for the bits you need check Amazon as they usually ship faster for a much lower cost than dedicated appliance repair sites.


This.

I've repaired a few in my lifetime. Often in the defroster part of the freezer, either the thermostat, heater element, or fan.
 
2022-11-29 12:29:35 AM  
I'm not handy like you guys but I get by. When the compressor went out on my LG fridge, the angry Japanese guy at LG support said I needed to call three different repair shops, get estimates, and expect it would take a couple months to get a repair scheduled, and they would only reimburse part of the cost.

I had bought the fridge at Home Despot and opted for the service warranty, so I called them and said basically the same thing. I hung up, called back, and spent about an hour trying different options in their phone system until I reached a support group that was responsive. They basically told me the same thing as the angry Japanese guy, but they also told me that they weren't part of Home Despot, they were the third party that handled warranty claims for Home Despot. I took down the name of their company.

Then I spent another hour researching their company until I found the contact info for several of their execs. I sent them emails explaining the situation, all the time I had already put in, what my normal hourly rate was, and that I would follow up with them personally if they didn't respond to my email. I included their personal addresses and suggested I could stop by if that was easier for them.

About an hour later I got a call from a "Premier Support Group" who was full of apologies. The soonest they could get a repair guy over would be three weeks, but they would send over a mini fridge to tide me over (which I could keep) and also sent a check for $300 for the food that had spoiled. Took me about 5 hours all told.

(I would never recommend buying an appliance from Home Despot BTW. A company that sells a service warranty and then tries to blow you off when you have a problem is a shiat company.)
 
2022-11-29 12:45:20 AM  

leviosaurus: I'm not handy like you guys but I get by. When the compressor went out on my LG fridge, the angry Japanese guy at LG support said I needed to call three different repair shops, get estimates, and expect it would take a couple months to get a repair scheduled, and they would only reimburse part of the cost.

I had bought the fridge at Home Despot and opted for the service warranty, so I called them and said basically the same thing. I hung up, called back, and spent about an hour trying different options in their phone system until I reached a support group that was responsive. They basically told me the same thing as the angry Japanese guy, but they also told me that they weren't part of Home Despot, they were the third party that handled warranty claims for Home Despot. I took down the name of their company.

Then I spent another hour researching their company until I found the contact info for several of their execs. I sent them emails explaining the situation, all the time I had already put in, what my normal hourly rate was, and that I would follow up with them personally if they didn't respond to my email. I included their personal addresses and suggested I could stop by if that was easier for them.

About an hour later I got a call from a "Premier Support Group" who was full of apologies. The soonest they could get a repair guy over would be three weeks, but they would send over a mini fridge to tide me over (which I could keep) and also sent a check for $300 for the food that had spoiled. Took me about 5 hours all told.

(I would never recommend buying an appliance from Home Despot BTW. A company that sells a service warranty and then tries to blow you off when you have a problem is a shiat company.)


FWIW I've only repaired past-warranty appliances.

You're right. That's what the f*cking warranty is for and it should be honored.
 
2022-11-29 12:57:29 AM  
I'm just glad I still have one of those dryers that can be repaired. Even my 3-year-old washing machine is pretty serviceable (I just learned from tearing it apart and cleaning the mold from the big door seal).

I did replace my fridge's ice maker. The aftermarket replacement has a... personality of its own when it comes to dispensing.
 
2022-11-29 1:42:05 AM  
I just had to repair my washing machine. Straightforward process, but I had to buy the entire control panel instead of the circuit board that was the actual source of the problem. Would probably only have cost me $50 instead of $200.
 
2022-11-29 1:44:54 AM  
I fixed our old washing machine 3 or 4 times (the same part each time - a plastic/rubber drive coupler that was apparently famous for cracking), before something bigger broke on it and it was time to replace it. Did the same with our old dryer until it stopped working completely, then when the new one broke after a year-and-a-half, figured out it was the ignition coil and ordered a new one. The newer washer has a drip problem, which is apparently the solenoids, and I'm just procrastinating on replacing it.

As others have said, YouTube has videos for most every make and model of appliance, and cover the vast majority of common problems, and there are so many websites (not just Amazon) to buy parts from nowadays, that unless it's something extremely complicated, it's usually worth the time to at least *try*.

Now, the old fridge, OTOH, was a disaster waiting to happen. I happened to get a large Visa gift card from a promotion for changing our health insurance coverage, so that went to getting a new fridge (with more space, better cooling, more power efficiency, and a built in ice maker and water dispenser) before the old one decided to cause a fire or something. There are exceptions to every rule/guideline, and this was one of them.
 
2022-11-29 1:53:28 AM  

Joe_diGriz: There are exceptions to every rule/guideline


Well, MOST of the time...
 
2022-11-29 2:09:18 AM  
A very modern problem.

One thing that I have learned from going through a lot of youtube videos for different things is that manufacturers often KNOW what the problem is. The points of failure are pretty uniform among customers. Doing a recall is so expensive that they just count on a certain percentage of customers complaining and needing some kind of compensation. The rest? Who cares? They don't care. It is all money. With air conditioners, it is very often the capacitors. VERY often. Manufacturers will buy them cheap and let the chips fall where they may. With refrigerators, ice makers are notoriously faulty, with moving parts, water spraying around, with jams and obstructions happening all the time. Washer/dryer combos have to provide two environments in a single space, making things really wet, and then really dry.

I do three things to make my life easy. First, I expect them to fail eventually. The warranty is the expected useful life. If it breaks after that, maybe I can fix it and maybe I can't. I don't get worked up about it. Second, I buy quality. Some manufacturers know what they are doing and don't cut corners. Cheap is cheap. Don't buy cheap. Nothing is worth the aggravation of dealing with clowns. Third, just avoid the whizzbangs altogether. Avoid getting involved with a Swiss Army knife when you know you are skinning a deer, or picking your teeth, or whatever.
 
2022-11-29 2:14:56 AM  
Manufacturers don't want you to be able to jailbreak / root your phone either, but there is a huge community of people trading information on how to do exactly that. Ditto for tweaking the tuning on your car.

Unlike $250,000 John Deere combines, common consumer products tend to develop hacker communities.

/ Misses when appliance manuals had complete exploded parts lists.
 
2022-11-29 2:38:50 AM  

damageddude: I have replaced our kitchen fridge two times, three if you count replacing the kitchen fridge we inherited, in the last 20 some odd years. Our garage refrigerator from the late 1960s will outlive us all.


I am pretty sure a lot of people have similar experiences. The iconic product that lasts forever. A GE coffee maker from the early 70s. A VW Beetle or Studebaker truck. An indestructible buck knife. And then come the imitators.  I am pretty sure that every device moves through different stages of market competition based on features, pricing, quality, etc. Eventually, throw-away devices get so cheap that they compete against high-quality, feature-packed, high-priced devices. They get ahead in the market by a halo effect... people will assume that the cheap knock off will do pretty much what the long established product will do. It leads to disappointment and "They don't make em like they used to."

The pitfall of a lot of older devices is that they don't have newer safety or energy-conservation features. My mom has a freezer, probably a Kenmore?, that she has had for at least 40 years. Works great! But whatever she has saved by freezing food in it, she has certainly more than lost by the constant electrical load, which is horrendous in summer.

I was amazed recently... I suppose it was last year already... when we had to get a refrigerator for a family member. The newer bigger ones were expensive. But they used so much LESS electricity than the smaller, cheaper, older ones that it was a no brainer. The difference would be made up in a year and a half. It might be a Japanese law that you have to display the expected annual electrical cost for a device, so the data are right there.

It is an important benefit of obsolescence. The world is changing and modern needs are met by modern devices designed for the way we live. If nothing broke down or got swept aside, nobody could move forward and find better lives.

Maybe I am amazed entirely too much. It does not appear to be obvious to everyone around me, but maybe it is.
 
2022-11-29 2:39:37 AM  

2fardownthread: With air conditioners, it is very often the capacitors. VERY often.


Is there really any better technology than the big, electrolytic capacitors that are used now?
 
2022-11-29 2:50:22 AM  

2fardownthread: A very modern problem.

One thing that I have learned from going through a lot of youtube videos for different things is that manufacturers often KNOW what the problem is. The points of failure are pretty uniform among customers. Doing a recall is so expensive that they just count on a certain percentage of customers complaining and needing some kind of compensation. The rest? Who cares? They don't care. It is all money. With air conditioners, it is very often the capacitors. VERY often. Manufacturers will buy them cheap and let the chips fall where they may. With refrigerators, ice makers are notoriously faulty, with moving parts, water spraying around, with jams and obstructions happening all the time. Washer/dryer combos have to provide two environments in a single space, making things really wet, and then really dry.

I do three things to make my life easy. First, I expect them to fail eventually. The warranty is the expected useful life. If it breaks after that, maybe I can fix it and maybe I can't. I don't get worked up about it. Second, I buy quality. Some manufacturers know what they are doing and don't cut corners. Cheap is cheap. Don't buy cheap. Nothing is worth the aggravation of dealing with clowns. Third, just avoid the whizzbangs altogether. Avoid getting involved with a Swiss Army knife when you know you are skinning a deer, or picking your teeth, or whatever.


Even worse many of the major 'manufacturers' don't even make their own products anymore and just slap their branding on them, like microwave ovens for example:

We found evidence that most countertop microwaves sold in the US are manufactured by just one company, Midea. We confirmed with Midea that it makes and sells Toshiba, Comfee, and Black+Decker ovens. We're also confident that GE, Whirlpool, Sharp, Breville, Insignia, Magic Chef, Hamilton Beach, and others also sell microwaves that were originally built and probably designed in large part by Midea

https://www.nytimes.com/wirecutter/reviews/best-microwave/
 
2022-11-29 2:51:28 AM  
You can use YouTube and Amazon, but Repair Clinic has all the stuff right there.
 
2022-11-29 2:53:57 AM  
After buying a Maytag washer with an electronic controller, I am certainly biased towards getting appliances with classic  cam based controllers for future purchases
 
2022-11-29 3:04:08 AM  

maxheck: Manufacturers don't want you to be able to jailbreak / root your phone either, but there is a huge community of people trading information on how to do exactly that. Ditto for tweaking the tuning on your car.

Unlike $250,000 John Deere combines, common consumer products tend to develop hacker communities.

/ Misses when appliance manuals had complete exploded parts lists.


The true promise of AR. Being able to look through the glasses at a machine and see a fully labeled exploded parts list. Will never happen for reasons listed in TFA. All of the software would be behind a large enough pay wall that I'll never see it.
 
2022-11-29 3:36:21 AM  
The beauty of renting my apartment is that when the fridge goes out, I contact my landlord and they fix it.

Same with the communal washer dryers. I'm out about $6 every three weeks when I do my wash. So about $100 a year for wash and dry (not counting the laundry detergent). What's the current retail rate for a good washer/dryer combo?
 
2022-11-29 3:51:49 AM  
I can vouch on this a little bit, they keypad board thingie and lights on my dishwasher have gone out. It's newer-ish, maybe 5 or under years old. Replacement part USED on eBay is like $400, there's also like 10 very slightly different button configurations under the same model name. Yeahhh. In my case the dishwasher still works, I just mash the damn buttons blindly till the thing comes on. New dishwashers run about $400-700 it seems.

Weird intersection of capitalism and first world problems. Just gonna keep banging the existing dishwasher 'till it blows up lol.
 
2022-11-29 4:10:45 AM  
I had a front end washer need repair a fews ago. It cost $695 and the repair three years alter would be $625. Easy decision.  What a waste.
 
2022-11-29 4:13:57 AM  

dericwater: r a good washer/dryer combo?


Depends if you want something to last. I dropped 2,300 on speed queen set. Mechanical, no fancy computer chip. Should last at last thirty years.
 
2022-11-29 4:22:13 AM  

RaceDTruck: Either make the information more readily available or suck up the cost of disposal.


I actually quite like that, hadn't thought of it before.

We have an act in NZ called the "Consumer Guarantees Act" and it applies to goods and services ordinarily sold for "domestic" use. (AKA a commercial fridge isn't covered, but a domestic fridge used in a commercial setting may be). And you hoof off to court if there's a dispute.

Anyway, an inclusion in this act and global equivalents where manufacturers must offer a service to collect and dispose of goods sold under their brand (including grey market goods) over a certain value and or weight at no cost to the consumer would be pretty cool and solve a lot of problems like this.

"I can't buy spare parts for this machine? Alright, please come and collect it and I'll buy another"

Or alternatively, "The repair will be what? That's more than X brand is selling theirs for, I won't go ahead with the repair, please come and collect it."

Suddenly brand repairs for large/expensive items will either become cost effective, or spare parts will be easy to find.
 
2022-11-29 4:23:03 AM  
They'll be motivated to keep it in your hands for as long as possible.
 
2022-11-29 4:30:26 AM  
In early 2020 my clothes washer failed after 15 years and would no longer pump water out. Replacement pump and manifold module was about $330 for a tech to install with a 12 week wait for the part.  Not a solution with 4 filth magnet kids. What to do? Watched a few youtube vids and ordered a $27 knockoff pump that came the next day.  Unscrew 2 screws to remove the old pump from the perfectly fine manifold and screw in the new pump. Voila new washer.
 
2022-11-29 7:16:37 AM  
I buy all my appliances from the guy who gets the returns from Home Depot. My fridge was half of a pair where the stove fell off the truck (literally) so the customer refused the entire order. The fridge had a scratch on the side... $900 for a $2500 fridge. The stove had a broken glass top so I got it from the guy for the cost of repairs and his time.. $750 for a $2000 stove.

He has good repair rates so if anything goes wrong, he will look at it. I got such a good deal on the initial cost that I don't care about paying $40/hour plus parts.
 
2022-11-29 7:30:38 AM  
Don't buy any Samsung appliances unless you have a desire to become your own repair technician.

Ice maker failure on a weekly basis. It has been removed to deice and free the mechanism so often that the mounting points are wore out. The mechanism has been replaced 5 times in 6 years. Each time with a new "revision" Samsung created to fix the issue. None have worked. I have had it apart at least 100 times. Nothing is broken, just designed wrong. The defrost cycle isn't long enough.

The microwave had to have a switch on the power outlet added, because it will spontaneously activate.  It's 3 years old. Again, nothing is broken, it is a design issue.

The washing machine is 5 now, and quits running half way through the cycle because it detects that it is not draining in the correct amount of time. Every other load. There is nothing wrong with the pump or drain, it just can't tell time.

The dryer worked two years and quit altogether. Brain failure.

My wife is fed up and is starting to replace them all. More waste for the landfill. Thanks Samsung!

(And yes, we had professional technicians try repairs first.... nope. They couldn't fix them either, so it's not me causing the problem.)
 
2022-11-29 7:35:04 AM  

leviosaurus: (I would never recommend buying an appliance from Home Despot BTW. A company that sells a service warranty and then tries to blow you off when you have a problem is a shiat company.)


Well hell, you just described most of the corporations up in this biatch!

/I have never once had a company respond to an issue with anything other than multiple attempts to get out of doing anything about it.
 
2022-11-29 7:40:42 AM  

dericwater: I'm out about $6 every three weeks when I do my wash.


Gods, if I were to wait that long to do laundry, my laundry bill would be low too.

/remind me never to visit without some VIcks VaporRub...
 
2022-11-29 7:45:30 AM  

payattention: dericwater: I'm out about $6 every three weeks when I do my wash.

Gods, if I were to wait that long to do laundry, my laundry bill would be low too.

/remind me never to visit without some VIcks VaporRub...


I also was like how the hell is that possible. That has to be the most generous laundromat in the US.
 
2022-11-29 7:57:56 AM  
Every Farker
media.tenor.comView Full Size


also later when family comes over
Fark user imageView Full Size


/why yes I did just binge watch Friends during Thanksgiving week, why do you ask?
 
2022-11-29 7:59:30 AM  
in June, our 3 year old fridge needed a part. there were no parts available anywhere in the world.

so we had to get a new fridge.
 
2022-11-29 8:03:14 AM  

amigafin: Don't buy any Samsung appliances unless you have a desire to become your own repair technician.

Ice maker failure on a weekly basis. It has been removed to deice and free the mechanism so often that the mounting points are wore out. The mechanism has been replaced 5 times in 6 years. Each time with a new "revision" Samsung created to fix the issue. None have worked. I have had it apart at least 100 times. Nothing is broken, just designed wrong. The defrost cycle isn't long enough.

The microwave had to have a switch on the power outlet added, because it will spontaneously activate.  It's 3 years old. Again, nothing is broken, it is a design issue.

The washing machine is 5 now, and quits running half way through the cycle because it detects that it is not draining in the correct amount of time. Every other load. There is nothing wrong with the pump or drain, it just can't tell time.

The dryer worked two years and quit altogether. Brain failure.

My wife is fed up and is starting to replace them all. More waste for the landfill. Thanks Samsung!

(And yes, we had professional technicians try repairs first.... nope. They couldn't fix them either, so it's not me causing the problem.)


we had a Samsung washer with one of those little washing tubs on top for delicates. but that top washer would always overflow and then the whole unit would shut down until it dried out. would take days. so we gave it away.

and i hate our Samsung TV. it wants desperately to control our entire entertainment world with its underpowered computer and buggy software. and i just want it to be a television.
 
2022-11-29 8:11:03 AM  
Can we talk about the link the article dropped in the middle for ice cube cereal?
 
2022-11-29 8:30:08 AM  

leviosaurus: I'm not handy like you guys but I get by. When the compressor went out on my LG fridge, the angry Japanese guy at LG support said I needed to call three different repair shops, get estimates, and expect it would take a couple months to get a repair scheduled, and they would only reimburse part of the cost.

I had bought the fridge at Home Despot and opted for the service warranty, so I called them and said basically the same thing. I hung up, called back, and spent about an hour trying different options in their phone system until I reached a support group that was responsive. They basically told me the same thing as the angry Japanese guy, but they also told me that they weren't part of Home Despot, they were the third party that handled warranty claims for Home Despot. I took down the name of their company.

Then I spent another hour researching their company until I found the contact info for several of their execs. I sent them emails explaining the situation, all the time I had already put in, what my normal hourly rate was, and that I would follow up with them personally if they didn't respond to my email. I included their personal addresses and suggested I could stop by if that was easier for them.

About an hour later I got a call from a "Premier Support Group" who was full of apologies. The soonest they could get a repair guy over would be three weeks, but they would send over a mini fridge to tide me over (which I could keep) and also sent a check for $300 for the food that had spoiled. Took me about 5 hours all told.

(I would never recommend buying an appliance from Home Despot BTW. A company that sells a service warranty and then tries to blow you off when you have a problem is a shiat company.)


LG and Samsung had a hard time with service when they entered the US market.

They didn't work with the parts distributors and wouldn't allow service shops to hold parts inventory.  On top of it they only wanted to pay mileage for one trip.  The rates were lower than all other brands, I mean Haier paid better.  They also wanted to ship the part directly to the customer and cause a week time for delivery.  Imagine an irate customer calling your shop and screaming because they have to wait a week for the refrigerator timer board.

They figured out their mistakes and play ball now with distributors, but they left a bad taste in the mouth of many shops who will not work with them now.

Also, get a fridge with a mechanical timer, no fancy crap.  Timer goes, thermostat goes, defrost element goes, fast easy fix, shop will most likely have the part on hand. Or the distribution center will get it in next day or two.  All compressors suck nowadays, except maybe commercial.  But you won't get commercial at a lumber yard or hardware store.  And it sure as hell won't say Whirlpool or Frigidaire.
 
2022-11-29 8:46:23 AM  
I'm currently playing this game in my head, try to fix it myself, I see a number of solutions to the problem I'm having online, call a technician to take a look at it or just buy a new fridge.  I'm leaning towards trying to fix it myself then buying a new fridge if that doesn't work.  It's probably the cheapest metal plated fridge the people who renovated my house could get.

In the early 80's my dad and all the people he shared an office with chipped in and bought a mini fridge.  They all retired before my dad did and eventually they moved him to a different office that already had a fridge so he brought it home and used it as his beer fridge... I'm currently using that 40 year old fridge until I decide what to do about my less that 5 year old one that already crapped the bed.
 
2022-11-29 8:50:11 AM  
Had a KitchenAid French door fridge that had a bad compressor from day one. It worked fine, but made a metallic buzzing sound like a fan blade was rubbing on something. We tried living with it, tried sound abatement around it, then tried getting the authorized repair place to come look at it. Or any repair place. But we live in rural Best Dakota. Nobody was willing to come out here, as they have more than enough business in town (can't really blame them).

Lesson learned. Bought a much cheaper Whirlpool side by side at Menards, and hauled the $3k, 16 month old KA to the landfill.

No point in buying a warranty IMHO. They are a HUGE profit-maker for big box stores, and essentially worthless unless you're in a decent sized city.

Appliances are not durable goods anymore, just like HD and bLowe's don't hire knowledgeable employees anymore. These things changed years ago, but these companies make fortunes perpetuating the myth that it is still the 1990s.

They don't think it be like it is, but it do.
 
2022-11-29 8:50:45 AM  
I can confirm I would never buy a Samsung appliance. Our fridge doesn't even have a full amount of replacement parts.

Also our LG washer sucks.

In general I have been completely unimpressed with anything labelling itself a 'smart' appliance.
 
2022-11-29 8:53:56 AM  
I have a 23-yo Subzero, cabinet-deep commercial fridge. It would cost over $12,000 to replace it. Any cabinet-deep fridge would set me back three or four grand, so as long as I can get parts and service, I'll repair it.

Not planning on replacing the ice maker, though. Two trays of cubes are plenty and when there's a party, I'll just buy a bagful.
 
2022-11-29 9:07:19 AM  

amigafin: Don't buy any Samsung appliances unless you have a desire to become your own repair technician.


Years ago, we were at my in-laws' place for Thanksgiving dinner with my wife's extended family. Her aunt was proudly showing off the new Samsung super-deluxe computerized-everything stove/oven that had been installed just a week or two before.

In the middle of cooking things, the oven just.... shut itself off. Completely. The whole control panel just suddenly  stopped working and lost power. Thankfully, the turkey was being deep fried, and so wasn't affected, but a lot of the side dishes had to be finished over a camp stove.

Turns out (much later, when they where able to get in a repair person) the logic board apparently overheated and some wires got loose from bad solder joints. That in itself has pretty much kept me away from anything involving Samsung and appliances.
 
2022-11-29 9:14:16 AM  

Joe_diGriz: amigafin: Don't buy any Samsung appliances unless you have a desire to become your own repair technician.

Years ago, we were at my in-laws' place for Thanksgiving dinner with my wife's extended family. Her aunt was proudly showing off the new Samsung super-deluxe computerized-everything stove/oven that had been installed just a week or two before.

In the middle of cooking things, the oven just.... shut itself off. Completely. The whole control panel just suddenly  stopped working and lost power. Thankfully, the turkey was being deep fried, and so wasn't affected, but a lot of the side dishes had to be finished over a camp stove.

Turns out (much later, when they where able to get in a repair person) the logic board apparently overheated and some wires got loose from bad solder joints. That in itself has pretty much kept me away from anything involving Samsung and appliances.


I've got a Samsung Washer and Dryer set, when the delivery guy was dropping it off in my basement he said "There's a good chance I'll be picking this back up in a couple weeks".  5 years on and they're still going, but yeah... the delivery guys would know.

It's just crazy because you'd think that'd be a company very interested in protecting their brand name.
 
2022-11-29 9:19:22 AM  

cleek: amigafin: Don't buy any Samsung appliances unless you have a desire to become your own repair technician.

Ice maker failure on a weekly basis. It has been removed to deice and free the mechanism so often that the mounting points are wore out. The mechanism has been replaced 5 times in 6 years. Each time with a new "revision" Samsung created to fix the issue. None have worked. I have had it apart at least 100 times. Nothing is broken, just designed wrong. The defrost cycle isn't long enough.

The microwave had to have a switch on the power outlet added, because it will spontaneously activate.  It's 3 years old. Again, nothing is broken, it is a design issue.

The washing machine is 5 now, and quits running half way through the cycle because it detects that it is not draining in the correct amount of time. Every other load. There is nothing wrong with the pump or drain, it just can't tell time.

The dryer worked two years and quit altogether. Brain failure.

My wife is fed up and is starting to replace them all. More waste for the landfill. Thanks Samsung!

(And yes, we had professional technicians try repairs first.... nope. They couldn't fix them either, so it's not me causing the problem.)

we had a Samsung washer with one of those little washing tubs on top for delicates. but that top washer would always overflow and then the whole unit would shut down until it dried out. would take days. so we gave it away.

and i hate our Samsung TV. it wants desperately to control our entire entertainment world with its underpowered computer and buggy software. and i just want it to be a television.


Let me add to the Samsung-hate.  Microwave, fridge and washing machine were all doo-doo.  When the freezer part of the fridge quit, e tried to find a service person to look at it.  Every one they called laughed and said they'd never work on a Samsung product.  Calling the company was no help, as the closest authorized service person was over 300 miles away from our home (in Buffalo).

We have a Samsung washing machine in our Scottsdale condo...it's about 6 years old and has a defect (potential to explode during spin cycle) that requires a technician to fix it.  It also likes to randomly restart its cycle over and over again.  On five different occasions we've made arrangements to have the tech come to our condo to fix it and every time, they show up at our Buffalo address.  This year we will be getting an new non-Samsung product to replace it.
 
2022-11-29 9:20:40 AM  
My wall oven died. Dual-unit convection oven. It's old, but was top of the line when installed before we bought the house. Top and bottom ovens would no longer reach temperature. A double wall oven starts at $5k. That's the entry point. I pulled the oven out, opened it up, it had 4 circuit boards--large boards, with through-hole components, not SMD. I found two relays, on two different boards, that had legs with no solder. Typically, even a 'dead' leg would still be anchored to the board with solder. I could tell it had solder at one point. I cleaned up the pad and resoldered the joint on both boards. Turned power back on, preheated the ovens, both worked perfectly. Saved myself $5,000. Proudest DIY-fix ever. I'd never have a chance with a modern unit with more integrated circuits and multi-layer boards.

Don't even get me started with refrigerators. We have a built-in unit, part of the cabinets. Entry point for a built-in fridge is $10,000. Fark me if that ever dies.
 
2022-11-29 9:24:34 AM  
As for the article, the big boys in appliances, GE, LG, Samsung, Whirlpool etc... will get to continue to charge a ridiculous amount of money for access to the software needed to make repairs, the smaller companies will eventually have to make it free if they don't already, otherwise service shops will drop their brands and nobody will want a disposable fridge... you can get those made out of Styrofoam and a bag of ice for a fraction of the coins you probably have sitting somewhere in your house.
 
2022-11-29 9:26:15 AM  

electricjebus: I've got a Samsung Washer and Dryer set, when the delivery guy was dropping it off in my basement he said "There's a good chance I'll be picking this back up in a couple weeks".  5 years on and they're still going, but yeah... the delivery guys would know.

It's just crazy because you'd think that'd be a company very interested in protecting their brand name.


I recently had to replace our 25 year old dryer that finally died. I went to an appliance shop--locally owned. The smarmy sales guy said "What are you looking for?" My Weeners was "I want one that doesn't have WIFI". You could see his face fall. He ushered me away from the WALL OF DRYERS over to a corner where they had 3 "analog" dryers.

Call my paranoid, but I don't want something that can be updated a week before the shareholders' meeting. And sure, you can just "not set up the wifi", but why pay for something you have no intention of using? A few years ago, I would have agreed that that sounds paranoid. But look at VW and some of the other consumer-fraud cases over the last decade. Corporations have no problem blatantly lying-to and scamming the consumer. No thanks. I don't need my dryer to tweet me when the load is done.
 
2022-11-29 9:33:38 AM  

GlamrLama: In early 2020 my clothes washer failed after 15 years and would no longer pump water out. Replacement pump and manifold module was about $330 for a tech to install with a 12 week wait for the part.  Not a solution with 4 filth magnet kids. What to do? Watched a few youtube vids and ordered a $27 knockoff pump that came the next day.  Unscrew 2 screws to remove the old pump from the perfectly fine manifold and screw in the new pump. Voila new washer.


The pump on my pressure washer broke due to winter freeze. My fault, I should have read the warning buried in fine print in the manual. Problem is that a replacement pump cost 3/4 the price of the whole unit. And that's if you do it yourself which is not recommended due to all the seals. And they don't sell that part anymore after two years anyway. So no repair; only replace.
 
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