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(NJ.com)   Muricans: We want jerbs. Same Muricans: NIMBY   (nj.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, New Jersey, Gloucester County, New Jersey, Harrison Township, New Jersey, million-square-foot warehouse project, North Jersey developer Russo Development, bucolic landscape of Mullica Hill, unincorporated community, residential development  
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1545 clicks; posted to Business » on 27 Nov 2022 at 8:30 PM (9 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



32 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-11-27 8:57:56 PM  
Oh, Fark you.  You live in an exurb of Philly.  Your magical bucolic farm is a subdivision built in 2008.   You didn't mind shoving your development into the previous residents' faces, but nobody new can spoil your view.  If you really wanted a bucolic rural jersey life, you'd be out in the Pine Barrens.
 
2022-11-27 9:18:12 PM  
Now this may seem a little harsh to some of you...
 
2022-11-27 9:19:45 PM  
Nimby: it crosses political lines where moderates actually get involved and where libs and r tards join together and choose evil.
 
2022-11-27 9:27:46 PM  
They aren't trying to save a state forest or something. It's farmland. They want some farmer to not be able to sell their own land. How about they pony up the dough to buy that farmland themselves if they want to be in charge of what happens to it?
 
2022-11-27 9:34:32 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size


The million square foot warehouse might be architecturally more appealing than the McMansionVille butted up to the NJ Turnpike in question.
 
2022-11-27 9:37:29 PM  
We actually have way more jobs than people right now.

But... I do find it funny.  The NIMBYs are being extremely literal:
"This is going to be directly in my backyard and that is the backside of our building, where our playgrounds are," Wallen-Fort said

The not in my backyard crowd is being literally quoted that they don't want it... because they'll be able to see it from their backyard.
 
2022-11-27 9:41:46 PM  
Warehouses are handy to increase the tax base without requiring as much in services. Put them over there, build a dirt brim around the place to keep noises in and activities out of sight.
 
2022-11-27 9:47:48 PM  

TheSubjunctive: [Fark user image 700x252]

The million square foot warehouse might be architecturally more appealing than the McMansionVille butted up to the NJ Turnpike in question.


That looks like a soul-sapping neighborhood to me. I think I'd lose the will to live after about 14 months in one of those homes.
 
2022-11-27 10:24:45 PM  

TheSubjunctive: [Fark user image 700x252]

The million square foot warehouse might be architecturally more appealing than the McMansionVille butted up to the NJ Turnpike in question.


Jesus, that place looks soulless.  And I say this as someone living in the darkest heart of suburbia.

Like are they not allowed to have any landscaping at all?  And the complete lack of any privacy in your own backyard is creepy as f*ck.
 
2022-11-27 10:33:29 PM  

Bonzo_1116: TheSubjunctive: [Fark user image 700x252]

The million square foot warehouse might be architecturally more appealing than the McMansionVille butted up to the NJ Turnpike in question.

Jesus, that place looks soulless.  And I say this as someone living in the darkest heart of suburbia.

Like are they not allowed to have any landscaping at all?  And the complete lack of any privacy in your own backyard is creepy as f*ck.


Those are homes made for banks - designed to be anonymous, soulless assets that can be predictably resold and which should hold their value,
 
2022-11-27 10:37:01 PM  

wildcardjack: Warehouses are handy to increase the tax base without requiring as much in services. Put them over there, build a dirt brim around the place to keep noises in and activities out of sight.


Prolly tax free for 10 years, most of the jobs will pay $10/hr, and the increase in truck traffic and piss jugs will make the area less desirable.
 
2022-11-27 10:52:20 PM  
Doesn't seem like they are requesting any variances from local zoning requirements.  Not sure what basis the locals have to even sue.
 
2022-11-27 11:15:19 PM  
Not Muricans, Mullicans.
 
2022-11-28 12:30:12 AM  
Also Americans "no one can tell me what I can do on my land, I get to tell my neighbors what they can use their land for."
 
2022-11-28 1:01:13 AM  

TheSubjunctive: [Fark user image 700x252]

The million square foot warehouse might be architecturally more appealing than the McMansionVille butted up to the NJ Turnpike in question.


Those houses don't look like they were designed for people to live in. They look like they were made to be snapped up and shoved into investment portfolios by banks and financial firms immediately after construction.
 
kab
2022-11-28 1:13:12 AM  
And in most cases, theres a tax break as incentive for the warehouse, so locals are on the hook for additional road maintenance that comes with trucking, etc.

I wouldnt want to live near that shiat either.
 
2022-11-28 1:25:47 AM  

Bonzo_1116: TheSubjunctive: [Fark user image 700x252]

The million square foot warehouse might be architecturally more appealing than the McMansionVille butted up to the NJ Turnpike in question.

Jesus, that place looks soulless.  And I say this as someone living in the darkest heart of suburbia.

Like are they not allowed to have any landscaping at all?  And the complete lack of any privacy in your own backyard is creepy as f*ck.


I bought a house and some small acreage well outside the city limits, and I'm dreading the idea that someone will develop the farm behind me into a subdivision. If I can't piss off my back porch in broad daylight, as much as I damn well please, I'm living too close to town.
 
2022-11-28 4:25:40 AM  
Literally the first documented case of a city expanding outwards ever.

/s
 
2022-11-28 4:40:32 AM  
It's weird that people start shrieking "NIMBY" because someone doesn't want a two millionsquare foot warehouse in their rural community. Not a single person here would want to live next door to that, rural, suburban or urban.  Y'all are acting like a bunch of edgelord supercilious little shiats.

Aw fark it.  Let everyone build anything anywhere, and if you aren't rich enough to buy your way out then too bad for you.  Let's have everyplace be like Texas!
 
2022-11-28 6:00:36 AM  

jake3988: We actually have way more jobs than people right now.

But... I do find it funny.  The NIMBYs are being extremely literal:
"This is going to be directly in my backyard and that is the backside of our building, where our playgrounds are," Wallen-Fort said

The not in my backyard crowd is being literally quoted that they don't want it... because they'll be able to see it from their backyard.


I don't get it. Of course they are being quoted saying it, it's their literal position.

Every town I've lived in has had zoning laws because, almost universally, people care about what they live next to and near. And, almost universally, people don't want to live in homes that are next to giant warehouses.

Not because they hate warehouses, but because they feel warehouses make poor neighbors to residential homes.
 
2022-11-28 6:32:31 AM  
They built/bought houses in a newish neighborhood, in an unincorporated area, next door to porperty zoned for commercial activity.  What did they think was going to happen there?
 
2022-11-28 7:36:15 AM  

sleze: Doesn't seem like they are requesting any variances from local zoning requirements.  Not sure what basis the locals have to even sue.


I have some experience in this area. You're right. If it's zoned commercial they can put up something of a commercial nature by right. The only issue they might have is with setbacks (which they said aren't going to be an issue), noise (which can be mitigated with baffles, landscaping, etc) and traffic. Can't do shiat about theoretical traffic increases.

The planning board determines what parcels are zoned for each township. The zoning board approves and disapproves variances to that zoning plan. Mullica Hill has a joint board.

Despite their wails and gnashing of teeth, this will likely be approved. A lawyer can slow down the process, but it's merely a speed bump unless the entirety of the town, and I mean 4000 out of the 4700 people that live there, protest the development.
 
2022-11-28 7:37:00 AM  

TheSubjunctive: [Fark user image 700x252]

The million square foot warehouse might be architecturally more appealing than the McMansionVille butted up to the NJ Turnpike in question.


The houses look fine.  Nice detailing, brick fronts.  It's new construction so the landscaping sucks, but that's how most new developments are.  It takes some time before the trees fill in, and the homes start to differentiate as people remodel them, add additions, etc.

Here's a newly built suburb in the 1950's:
imgs.search.brave.comView Full Size


And today:
Fark user imageView Full Size


jake3988: We actually have way more jobs than people right now.

But... I do find it funny.  The NIMBYs are being extremely literal:
"This is going to be directly in my backyard and that is the backside of our building, where our playgrounds are," Wallen-Fort said

The not in my backyard crowd is being literally quoted that they don't want it... because they'll be able to see it from their backyard.


I'm confused on the bit where the people in this neighborhood are somehow the "same" Americans who want more blue collar warehouse jobs.

Fark user imageView Full Size


Somehow I don't see much local interest in a $14/hour wage.
 
2022-11-28 7:49:21 AM  

Raoul Eaton: It's weird that people start shrieking "NIMBY" because someone doesn't want a two millionsquare foot warehouse in their rural community. Not a single person here would want to live next door to that, rural, suburban or urban.  Y'all are acting like a bunch of edgelord supercilious little shiats.


They built their unincorporated suburb development right next to the only exit for 15+ miles in either direction on a very busy freeway with a straight-shot to one of the major bridges to Philly.  What did they think was going to happen?
 
2022-11-28 8:06:32 AM  

QFarker: They built/bought houses in a newish neighborhood, in an unincorporated area, next door to porperty zoned for commercial activity.  What did they think was going to happen there?


But hey, they avoided city taxes.
 
2022-11-28 10:07:48 AM  
Some years ago I read a news story about a contentious zoning meeting in a Jersey town where Wawa wanted to build a new store.   People who lived in a gated condo development were enraged that the proposed Wawa would be within walking distance of their condos.  After a number of the condo owners stood up at the podium to register their opposition an old lady who lived in a 50s era subdivision got up and said, "What you condo owners said about the Wawa is what the owners of houses in the older part of town said about your condo development."

The Suburbs Are Bleeding America Dry | Climate Town (feat. Not Just Bikes)
Youtube SfsCniN7Nsc
 
2022-11-28 10:14:14 AM  

Fark_Guy_Rob: jake3988: We actually have way more jobs than people right now.

But... I do find it funny.  The NIMBYs are being extremely literal:
"This is going to be directly in my backyard and that is the backside of our building, where our playgrounds are," Wallen-Fort said

The not in my backyard crowd is being literally quoted that they don't want it... because they'll be able to see it from their backyard.

I don't get it. Of course they are being quoted saying it, it's their literal position.

Every town I've lived in has had zoning laws because, almost universally, people care about what they live next to and near. And, almost universally, people don't want to live in homes that are next to giant warehouses.

Not because they hate warehouses, but because they feel warehouses make poor neighbors to residential homes.


This.  When you have conflicting zoning adjacent to each other, you are going to have issues.  Because one side wants to live there while the other wants to make a profit.  Usually the latter gives little to no shiats about the former.

Requiring large buffers can help, but that cuts into the profit potential of a parcel.  Also, requiring strict noise, pollution, and speed controls for vehicles visiting the site would help, but that's just un-American.
 
2022-11-28 10:23:18 AM  

Marksrevenge: They aren't trying to save a state forest or something. It's farmland. They want some farmer to not be able to sell their own land. How about they pony up the dough to buy that farmland themselves if they want to be in charge of what happens to it?


At least sell it to China. They're really good at not letting anyone see what's happening on their properties.
 
2022-11-28 10:39:42 AM  

TheSubjunctive: Raoul Eaton: It's weird that people start shrieking "NIMBY" because someone doesn't want a two millionsquare foot warehouse in their rural community. Not a single person here would want to live next door to that, rural, suburban or urban.  Y'all are acting like a bunch of edgelord supercilious little shiats.

They built their unincorporated suburb development right next to the only exit for 15+ miles in either direction on a very busy freeway with a straight-shot to one of the major bridges to Philly.  What did they think was going to happen?


They did it for the same reason the commercial developers want in... no one else was there and so it's dirt cheap.

I'm sure it didn't cross their minds that others might notice and join in.

This is one of those 'we found this place first, back off' NIMBY situations

/Also, amusing how many NIMBYs are in this thread.  Never thought I'd meet one in the wild.  They're apparently more prevalent than I thought.
 
2022-11-28 11:49:17 AM  

jake3988: TheSubjunctive: Raoul Eaton: It's weird that people start shrieking "NIMBY" because someone doesn't want a two millionsquare foot warehouse in their rural community. Not a single person here would want to live next door to that, rural, suburban or urban.  Y'all are acting like a bunch of edgelord supercilious little shiats.

They built their unincorporated suburb development right next to the only exit for 15+ miles in either direction on a very busy freeway with a straight-shot to one of the major bridges to Philly.  What did they think was going to happen?

They did it for the same reason the commercial developers want in... no one else was there and so it's dirt cheap.

I'm sure it didn't cross their minds that others might notice and join in.

This is one of those 'we found this place first, back off' NIMBY situations

/Also, amusing how many NIMBYs are in this thread.  Never thought I'd meet one in the wild.  They're apparently more prevalent than I thought.


Almost everyone is a NIMBY and a YIMBY if they own property.  People advocate to bring in desirable neighbors (meaning developments, businesses, parks, etc) and to keep out undesirable ones. People disagree on what is desirable and undesirable, but they all care.
 
2022-11-28 12:14:25 PM  
This planet is going to have no green left in 100 years. I don't care, I'll be dead.
 
2022-11-28 11:00:23 PM  

Marcos P: This planet is going to have no green left in 100 years. I don't care, I'll be dead.


It's NJ. How much green do you think they actually have?
 
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