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(Schultz Museum)   100 years ago brings us to the start of flying dogs, amateur psychologists, and AUGGGHHHH the football   (schulzmuseum.org) divider line
    More: Amusing, Web browser, Charles M. Schulz, Comic strip, HTTP cookie, Internet privacy, Use #Schulz100, use of cookies, Peanuts  
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925 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 26 Nov 2022 at 5:50 PM (9 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



18 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-11-26 1:42:00 PM  
Then Tim Cook stole the holiday specials from network TV so you have to pay for them now.
 
2022-11-26 2:07:16 PM  
Schultz was the young cartoonist who casually introduced to thousands of American homes the idea of an integrated children's Thanksgiving dinner, not due to some deep social protest or statement, but just because the kids were friends. Younger generations would be hard-pressed to understand how the cultural importance of Franklin.

I was too young to remember clearly, but I have vague memories of our fathers and uncles reacting with hatred and racism at least one year; maybe two. Our grandparents countered essentially telling them to shut up, catch up with the rest of the world, and let the rest of us enjoy the show in peace. Even our Greatest Generation/Silent Generation grandparents were taken aback by the hateful attitude of our Boomer fathers. In light of who our parents were, I don't think they were particularly surprised when their Generation X grandkids grew up cynical as hell. Now phrases like economic justice, racial harmony, and world peace are mocked and border on being pejorative terms like social justice warrior and woke.

Sigh. What ever, man.
 
2022-11-26 6:08:45 PM  

Bruscar: Schultz was the young cartoonist who casually introduced to thousands of American homes the idea of an integrated children's Thanksgiving dinner, not due to some deep social protest or statement, but just because the kids were friends. Younger generations would be hard-pressed to understand how the cultural importance of Franklin.

I was too young to remember clearly, but I have vague memories of our fathers and uncles reacting with hatred and racism at least one year; maybe two. Our grandparents countered essentially telling them to shut up, catch up with the rest of the world, and let the rest of us enjoy the show in peace. Even our Greatest Generation/Silent Generation grandparents were taken aback by the hateful attitude of our Boomer fathers. In light of who our parents were, I don't think they were particularly surprised when their Generation X grandkids grew up cynical as hell. Now phrases like economic justice, racial harmony, and world peace are mocked and border on being pejorative terms like social justice warrior and woke.

Sigh. What ever, man.


I remember watching with my parents as a kid. They were Depression era kids, born in 1936. I don't know what generation that makes them but there was no racism about them. I was born in 1960 so I guess that makes me a Boomer. I loved watching all the Peanuts specials when I was growing up. Please, don't generalize people this way. You're not helping.
 
2022-11-26 6:09:00 PM  
The Schulz estate to bring lawsuits against every one of them in 3...2....

/ haven't read comics in decades, was only familiar with a few strips.
 
2022-11-26 6:40:48 PM  

blondambition: Bruscar: Schultz was the young cartoonist who casually introduced to thousands of American homes the idea of an integrated children's Thanksgiving dinner, not due to some deep social protest or statement, but just because the kids were friends. Younger generations would be hard-pressed to understand how the cultural importance of Franklin.

I was too young to remember clearly, but I have vague memories of our fathers and uncles reacting with hatred and racism at least one year; maybe two. Our grandparents countered essentially telling them to shut up, catch up with the rest of the world, and let the rest of us enjoy the show in peace. Even our Greatest Generation/Silent Generation grandparents were taken aback by the hateful attitude of our Boomer fathers. In light of who our parents were, I don't think they were particularly surprised when their Generation X grandkids grew up cynical as hell. Now phrases like economic justice, racial harmony, and world peace are mocked and border on being pejorative terms like social justice warrior and woke.

Sigh. What ever, man.

I remember watching with my parents as a kid. They were Depression era kids, born in 1936. I don't know what generation that makes them but there was no racism about them. I was born in 1960 so I guess that makes me a Boomer. I loved watching all the Peanuts specials when I was growing up. Please, don't generalize people this way. You're not helping.


They were the Silent Generation: Silent Generation - Wikipedia
 
2022-11-26 7:17:20 PM  

blondambition: I remember watching with my parents as a kid. They were Depression era kids, born in 1936. I don't know what generation that makes them but there was no racism about them. I was born in 1960 so I guess that makes me a Boomer. I loved watching all the Peanuts specials when I was growing up. Please, don't generalize people this way. You're not helping.


Thank you!  My husband and I are boomers (1958 & 1961), always vote blue, know how to use modern electronics.  Peanuts were our childhood! We never noticed about Franklin's race, or Peppermint Patty's 'sexuality' _WE WERE KIDS and Peanuts ruled!
 
2022-11-26 7:27:04 PM  
I can't believe that some of those old straps are sill around- Andy Capp?? Snuffy Smith??
 
2022-11-26 7:31:49 PM  
Looked like a few, like FBoFW, came out of retirement just for this. A sweet gesture by 102 (!) artists
 
2022-11-26 7:45:15 PM  

blondambition: Bruscar: Schultz was the young cartoonist who casually introduced to thousands of American homes the idea of an integrated children's Thanksgiving dinner, not due to some deep social protest or statement, but just because the kids were friends. Younger generations would be hard-pressed to understand how the cultural importance of Franklin.

I was too young to remember clearly, but I have vague memories of our fathers and uncles reacting with hatred and racism at least one year; maybe two. Our grandparents countered essentially telling them to shut up, catch up with the rest of the world, and let the rest of us enjoy the show in peace. Even our Greatest Generation/Silent Generation grandparents were taken aback by the hateful attitude of our Boomer fathers. In light of who our parents were, I don't think they were particularly surprised when their Generation X grandkids grew up cynical as hell. Now phrases like economic justice, racial harmony, and world peace are mocked and border on being pejorative terms like social justice warrior and woke.

Sigh. What ever, man.

I remember watching with my parents as a kid. They were Depression era kids, born in 1936. I don't know what generation that makes them but there was no racism about them. I was born in 1960 so I guess that makes me a Boomer. I loved watching all the Peanuts specials when I was growing up. Please, don't generalize people this way. You're not helping.


My parents grew up in the 1930's... my dad was a bit racist (he hated what he called "jungle bunny" music), but my mom was anything but racist, and she did most of the raising of me and my brothers and sisters, and she helped form my absolute hatred for anything smacking of Nazism after she talked about meeting one of my aunts-by-marriage after WWII (said aunt-by-marriage survived one of the death camps, and all my mother would say about her first meeting with that aunt-by-marriage was, in a rather horrified voice, "She was so thin... she was so thin").
 
2022-11-26 8:51:05 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-11-26 9:06:20 PM  
I was raised on a lot of peanuts growing up. Too bad it wasn't very funny just the tragic story of a chronically depressed kid that kinda sucked at everything who was also somehow also bald. I think charlie brown needed to be assessed for a learning disability.
 
2022-11-26 9:33:38 PM  
This one made me smile

schulzmuseum.orgView Full Size
 
2022-11-26 10:17:09 PM  

ClavellBCMI: blondambition: Bruscar: Schultz was the young cartoonist who casually introduced to thousands of American homes the idea of an integrated children's Thanksgiving dinner, not due to some deep social protest or statement, but just because the kids were friends. Younger generations would be hard-pressed to understand how the cultural importance of Franklin.

I was too young to remember clearly, but I have vague memories of our fathers and uncles reacting with hatred and racism at least one year; maybe two. Our grandparents countered essentially telling them to shut up, catch up with the rest of the world, and let the rest of us enjoy the show in peace. Even our Greatest Generation/Silent Generation grandparents were taken aback by the hateful attitude of our Boomer fathers. In light of who our parents were, I don't think they were particularly surprised when their Generation X grandkids grew up cynical as hell. Now phrases like economic justice, racial harmony, and world peace are mocked and border on being pejorative terms like social justice warrior and woke.

Sigh. What ever, man.

I remember watching with my parents as a kid. They were Depression era kids, born in 1936. I don't know what generation that makes them but there was no racism about them. I was born in 1960 so I guess that makes me a Boomer. I loved watching all the Peanuts specials when I was growing up. Please, don't generalize people this way. You're not helping.

My parents grew up in the 1930's... my dad was a bit racist (he hated what he called "jungle bunny" music), but my mom was anything but racist, and she did most of the raising of me and my brothers and sisters, and she helped form my absolute hatred for anything smacking of Nazism after she talked about meeting one of my aunts-by-marriage after WWII (said aunt-by-marriage survived one of the death camps, and all my mother would say about her first meeting with that aunt-by-marriage was, in a rather horrified voice, "She was so thin... she was so thin").


CSB
 
2022-11-26 11:46:31 PM  

RandomInternetComment: I was raised on a lot of peanuts growing up. Too bad it wasn't very funny just the tragic story of a chronically depressed kid that kinda sucked at everything who was also somehow also bald. I think charlie brown needed to be assessed for a learning disability.


Oh sh*t.  He was as sharp, or sharper, than a lot of people (including grown-ups) that I knew
 
2022-11-27 3:03:24 AM  

Truthman: I can't believe that some of those old straps are sill around- Andy Capp?? Snuffy Smith??


Andy Capp even has a snack line.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-11-27 4:22:22 AM  

Raider_dad: Truthman: I can't believe that some of those old straps are sill around- Andy Capp?? Snuffy Smith??

Andy Capp even has a snack line.

[Fark user image image 612x612]


The British are scum and it's an insult that there isn't a peanuts snack.  More proof that the comic sucks.  Hot fries ain't bad.

Still, down with the British.
 
2022-11-27 4:44:16 AM  

Billy Liar: RandomInternetComment: I was raised on a lot of peanuts growing up. Too bad it wasn't very funny just the tragic story of a chronically depressed kid that kinda sucked at everything who was also somehow also bald. I think charlie brown needed to be assessed for a learning disability.

Oh sh*t.  He was as sharp, or sharper, than a lot of people (including grown-ups) that I knew


You were around some...very dumb adults then. *Makes adult WAH WAH WAH talking sound
 
2022-11-27 9:21:29 AM  
Pretty sure the Doonesbury one is a repeat.
 
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