Skip to content
Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(History Channel)   On this day in history, in 1952, Agatha Christie built a better Mousetrap and the world continues to beat a path to the door   (history.com) divider line
    More: Vintage, Agatha Christie, playwright Agatha Christie, longest continuously running play, Richard Attenborough, The Mousetrap, murder-mystery, hugely successful English mystery novelist, London premiere of Christie  
•       •       •

2675 clicks; posted to Main » on 25 Nov 2022 at 12:20 PM (9 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



26 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-11-25 12:37:49 PM  
See How They Run was a very good movie. I'm looking forward to seeing it again when it shows up at Redbox.
 
2022-11-25 12:40:05 PM  
visiting England with a friend who had been countless times, and who insisted we see "The Mousetrap". halfway through i couldn't help but notice she was napping. when i asked her about it later she said, "oh it's not very good, and i've seen it so many times".
...then why did we come?
"it's what you do"
apparently this was a thing among hardcore Anglophiles
 
2022-11-25 12:43:26 PM  
Been and seen it twice. Agreed it wasn't the best play of all the ones I've seen, but it's a fun evening and well worth seeing if you ever make it to London.
 
2022-11-25 12:44:39 PM  
I thought "See how the Run" was the perfect tribute to the "Mousetrap". It wasn't a good movie but it looked like it would be good because of the names associated with it.

I'd say this moment in history was an excuse for an ad.
 
2022-11-25 1:11:02 PM  

sinner4ever: I thought "See how the Run" was the perfect tribute to the "Mousetrap". It wasn't a good movie but it looked like it would be good because of the names associated with it.

I'd say this moment in history was an excuse for an ad.


I found it "OK" which I take it is how most theatregoers find "Mousetrap."  I really wanted it to be better, with the actors involved, but it was just too hackneyed and corny for it to really shine as either a comedy or a mystery/thriller.
 
2022-11-25 1:14:47 PM  
Christie is often mocked for her flimsy plots but it's really her ludicrous solutions that leave one gasping. As a pulp writer, her characters are often far more convincing than most. And she's a very serious person. There's no shading in her moral POV: evil is real.
 
2022-11-25 1:19:12 PM  
The Mousetrap is the long-running play in which a convent of nuns, short on money, solves a murder at a hair salon?
 
2022-11-25 1:20:22 PM  
A lot of Negative Nellies in this thread. Perhaps they need to stimulate the little grey cells, n'est pas?
 
2022-11-25 1:21:35 PM  
Every Saturday on PBS.
 
2022-11-25 1:24:08 PM  
I just want to say that Mousetrap the boardgame was better than Mousetrap the video game.
 
2022-11-25 1:31:17 PM  
I absolutely adore Agatha Christie. I've never seen The Mousetrap, but I've read all her works. The David Suchet Hercule Poirots and the Joan Hixon Miss Marples cannot be beat. The new movie versions they're making now are trash, but the original Murder on the Orient Express and Death on the Nile are fabulous.
 
2022-11-25 1:52:58 PM  

Fano: A lot of Negative Nellies in this thread. Perhaps they need to stimulate the little grey cells, n'est pas?


Lord Edge & the Knights of Mum's Basement Lair take their armchair critic hobby very VERY seriously.
 
2022-11-25 2:09:39 PM  

oldfarthenry: Fano: A lot of Negative Nellies in this thread. Perhaps they need to stimulate the little grey cells, n'est pas?

Lord Edge & the Knights of Mum's Basement Lair take their armchair critic hobby very VERY seriously.


I'm sure they all figured out the Murder of Roger Ackroyd by page 2.
 
2022-11-25 2:21:57 PM  

sinner4ever: I thought "See how the Run" was the perfect tribute to the "Mousetrap". It wasn't a good movie but it looked like it would be good because of the names associated with it.

I'd say this moment in history was an excuse for an ad.


That movie was a mess and could have been much better.  Probably because it was entirely fan service to something I am unfamiliar with.
 
2022-11-25 2:32:00 PM  
Damn kids and their newfangled Agatha Cristie. Your generation is ruining art.

When I was your age we'd attend a George Bernard Shaw performance and we'd be thankful for the adherence to realism!
 
2022-11-25 2:55:57 PM  
It's an alright play, and an interesting twist when you discover the murderer is actually
 
2022-11-25 3:24:36 PM  

guinsu: sinner4ever: I thought "See how the Run" was the perfect tribute to the "Mousetrap". It wasn't a good movie but it looked like it would be good because of the names associated with it.

I'd say this moment in history was an excuse for an ad.

That movie was a mess and could have been much better.  Probably because it was entirely fan service to something I am unfamiliar with.


An homage to 70 year old play no one under the age of 60 has seen.

After Murder on the Orient Express and Murder on the Nile, Hollywood is on an Agatha Christie kick.
 
2022-11-25 3:27:40 PM  

HempHead: guinsu: sinner4ever: I thought "See how the Run" was the perfect tribute to the "Mousetrap". It wasn't a good movie but it looked like it would be good because of the names associated with it.

I'd say this moment in history was an excuse for an ad.

That movie was a mess and could have been much better.  Probably because it was entirely fan service to something I am unfamiliar with.

An homage to 70 year old play no one under the age of 60 has seen.

After Murder on the Orient Express and Murder on the Nile, Hollywood is on an Agatha Christie kick.


But it's weird watching them sexy and action it up
 
2022-11-25 3:51:36 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-11-25 3:51:51 PM  
Read some of the Christies in HS for my Modern Mysteries class.  They were okay, but I don't think I've read any since then, and that was 40+ years ago.  Not big on the "Cozy" mystery, but will read one about every ten years.  I like MC Beaton's Hamish MacBeth stories - village constable happy as a village constable.
 
2022-11-25 6:20:13 PM  
I won't reveal spoilers for this famous play because, quite frankly, I don't remember  what they are. But it is famous for its clever gimmick. Go see it if you can and like that sort of thing.
 
2022-11-25 6:46:01 PM  

Fano: oldfarthenry: Fano: A lot of Negative Nellies in this thread. Perhaps they need to stimulate the little grey cells, n'est pas?

Lord Edge & the Knights of Mum's Basement Lair take their armchair critic hobby very VERY seriously.

I'm sure they all figured out the Murder of Roger Ackroyd by page 2.


If you read mysteries a lot, you can pretty quickly figure it out. The thing is, it's one of the first times that plot was used, but it's been used a whole lot since then, so we have the advantage of hindsight.

/Figured it out during the part which is glossed over, for exactly the reason stated in the book.
//Christie is a master, and almost all of her books are well-plotted and excellent.
///Except for the Tommy and Tuppence ones. Those should be burned in a fire forever and ever.
 
2022-11-25 7:14:33 PM  
Christie, already a hugely successful English mystery novelist, originally wrote the drama for Queen Mary, wife of the late King George V. Initially called "Three Blind Mice," it debuted as a 30-minute radio play on the queen's 80th birthday in 1947.

Oh! Oh! Oh! An opportunity to bash the BRF!
 
2022-11-26 9:29:46 AM  
1stsss.comView Full Size
 
2022-11-26 12:10:06 PM  

doomsdayaddams: I absolutely adore Agatha Christie. I've never seen The Mousetrap, but I've read all her works. The David Suchet Hercule Poirots and the Joan Hixon Miss Marples cannot be beat. The new movie versions they're making now are trash, but the original Murder on the Orient Express and Death on the Nile are fabulous.


Counterpoint: The Peter Ustinov Poirot was buffoonish and louche, did *not* resemble Poirot in any way. Poirot was described as "egg-shaped," but was meant to be small and rounded/pot-bellied, not enormous and grossly obese, and defeinitely not clownish.

If you meant only the Albert Finney Poirot, then fine, but he wasn't in "Death..."
 
2022-11-26 1:50:20 PM  

deadsanta: doomsdayaddams: I absolutely adore Agatha Christie. I've never seen The Mousetrap, but I've read all her works. The David Suchet Hercule Poirots and the Joan Hixon Miss Marples cannot be beat. The new movie versions they're making now are trash, but the original Murder on the Orient Express and Death on the Nile are fabulous.

Counterpoint: The Peter Ustinov Poirot was buffoonish and louche, did *not* resemble Poirot in any way. Poirot was described as "egg-shaped," but was meant to be small and rounded/pot-bellied, not enormous and grossly obese, and defeinitely not clownish.

If you meant only the Albert Finney Poirot, then fine, but he wasn't in "Death..."


Albert Finney in Orient Express, Ustinov in Death on the Nile (because of the rest of the cast), David Suchet forever and ever EXCEPT in his remake of Orient Express, which sucked.
 
Displayed 26 of 26 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking




On Twitter


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.