Skip to content
Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Ars Technica)   Either NASA has taken out a huge insurance policy on SLS or someone knows it will never fly and is trying to kill it on purpose as they have decided to leave it on the pad which in the direct path of Hurricane Nicole   (arstechnica.com) divider line
    More: Facepalm, Tropical cyclone, Kennedy Space Center, Space Launch System rocket, Wind, launch pad, subtropical storm Nicole, Rocket, Monday afternoon  
•       •       •

444 clicks; posted to STEM » on 08 Nov 2022 at 11:23 AM (11 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



19 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-11-08 12:49:36 PM  
The hurricane can't take out the SLS, because as a nation we can't be that lucky.
 
2022-11-08 1:06:07 PM  
Nicole is predicted to be Category 1. A direct hit should be NBD, and if anything a stress test to see what needs to be improved.
 
2022-11-08 1:18:57 PM  

fragMasterFlash: Nicole is predicted to be Category 1. A direct hit should be NBD, and if anything a stress test to see what needs to be improved.


Difficulty: Boeing's recent track record with rain fouling up the valves.
 
2022-11-08 1:37:17 PM  

fragMasterFlash: Nicole is predicted to be Category 1. A direct hit should be NBD, and if anything a stress test to see what needs to be improved.


Was about to say if it can't handle a cat 1 that whole massive controlled explosion yeeting it at thousands of MPH is going to be a biatch!
 
2022-11-08 1:54:37 PM  
Knots are a term used in meteorology and maritime navigation and are equal to 1 nautical mile per hour.

Thanks Rick.
 
2022-11-08 2:01:14 PM  

DoBeDoBeDo: fragMasterFlash: Nicole is predicted to be Category 1. A direct hit should be NBD, and if anything a stress test to see what needs to be improved.

Was about to say if it can't handle a cat 1 that whole massive controlled explosion yeeting it at thousands of MPH is going to be a biatch!


I feel the spaceships are designed for acceleration around very specific conditions. Mostly with the flame-y bit pointed towards the ground.
 
2022-11-08 2:47:28 PM  
They just need to add some more struts.
 
2022-11-08 2:58:14 PM  
Yeah yeah yeah, we know.

1.bp.blogspot.comView Full Size
 
2022-11-08 3:20:35 PM  
Yeah, and the shuttle o-rings won't be affected by a little cold.
 
2022-11-08 3:22:19 PM  

Gubbo: DoBeDoBeDo: fragMasterFlash: Nicole is predicted to be Category 1. A direct hit should be NBD, and if anything a stress test to see what needs to be improved.

Was about to say if it can't handle a cat 1 that whole massive controlled explosion yeeting it at thousands of MPH is going to be a biatch!

I feel the spaceships are designed for acceleration around very specific conditions. Mostly with the flame-y bit pointed towards the ground.


While true I have to imagine that at 4,000MPH and 5.75 Million pounds a side shear of 74MPH isn't out of the question for normal operation.
 
2022-11-08 3:29:15 PM  

DoBeDoBeDo: Gubbo: DoBeDoBeDo: fragMasterFlash: Nicole is predicted to be Category 1. A direct hit should be NBD, and if anything a stress test to see what needs to be improved.

Was about to say if it can't handle a cat 1 that whole massive controlled explosion yeeting it at thousands of MPH is going to be a biatch!

I feel the spaceships are designed for acceleration around very specific conditions. Mostly with the flame-y bit pointed towards the ground.

While true I have to imagine that at 4,000MPH and 5.75 Million pounds a side shear of 74MPH isn't out of the question for normal operation.


Falcon 9 won't launch through winds in excess of 30mph.

And by the time you get to 4,000 miles an hour you're dealing with a whole lot less atmosphere than ground level.

/I think you've taken this bit too far and you dial it back gracefully
 
2022-11-08 4:47:04 PM  

Gubbo: I feel the spaceships are designed for acceleration around very specific conditions. Mostly with the flame-y bit pointed towards the ground.


Exactly.  They're built to take a lot of force in specific situations.  They are not built to resist forces in other directions.  We have two videos of large rockets that turned too quickly in the sky (and they aren't built with much ability to turn because they're not able to withstand it) and both end up with the rocket coming apart and turning into a huge fireball.  (Admittedly, one of them the boom is augmented as the rocket sensed it's doom and suicided.)

DoBeDoBeDo: While true I have to imagine that at 4,000MPH and 5.75 Million pounds a side shear of 74MPH isn't out of the question for normal operation.


Actually, I would think those conditions would never occur.  By the time it's up to 4,000 mph there's going to be very little atmosphere around and thus very little shear.  Rockets start out basically straight up because you have to get above most of the atmosphere before you pile on too much velocity.  Maximum efficiency is actually attained by going straight sideways (but the rocket wouldn't be pointed straight sideways) from the launch pad--but you can't do that in atmosphere and even on an airless body you won't have the turn authority to actually do it.  (Now, if you're playing KSP with it's ridiculously overpowered turning ability that's another matter.  I've lifted from Minmus with a 1-second burn, rotate to horizontal and then burn for orbit--more efficient than anything MechJeb can do.)
 
2022-11-08 5:04:57 PM  
You can't move something like that quite as easily as just backing a car out of a driveway.

Seems kinda obvious.
 
2022-11-08 5:47:25 PM  
Considering the seals in the solid rocket boosters are two years into a one year certification... BUT, the engineers were able to re-certify them, just like management demanded. No changes to the seals, just new paperwork.

However, I do hope they launch (fly or fail) soon, so the way can be cleared for Starship to launch.
 
2022-11-08 6:15:04 PM  

fragMasterFlash: Nicole is predicted to be Category 1. A direct hit should be NBD, and if anything a stress test to see what needs to be improved.


So, the storm qualifies as "MIN-Q"?

As the man said, Boeing has a lousy record with valves getting wet.
 
2022-11-08 8:38:50 PM  
managers have determined the Space Launch System rocket and Orion will remain at Launch Pad 39B

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-11-08 9:37:00 PM  
I've seen that movie... AND the MST3K version.
 
2022-11-08 11:47:29 PM  
I'm leaving my cars outside, again. This time the storm's coming all the way across the state before it hits us.

If my Mazda survives and the SLS doesn't, Boeing has some explaining to do.
 
2022-11-09 7:20:08 AM  
I was under the impression rockets start pitching before they reach max q. Anybody have sure information?
 
Displayed 19 of 19 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking




On Twitter


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.