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(AP News)   Morning becomes electric. The Blue Bird out front should have told you   (apnews.com) divider line
    More: Cool, School bus, school districts, school buses, Natural gas, Joe Biden, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Greenhouse gas, Bus  
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719 clicks; posted to Business » on 26 Oct 2022 at 5:23 PM (15 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



14 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-10-26 3:26:15 PM  
Republicans will be outraged. Good.
 
2022-10-26 5:49:59 PM  

Walker: Republicans will be outraged. Good.


Well she is wearing a tan suit

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-10-26 6:15:10 PM  
Good. Those old school buses were (are) particularly noxious with their exhaust. Even city buses (here in SF) are fairly clean, exhaust-wise.
 
2022-10-26 6:20:53 PM  
$400000 per bus?  Am I missing something here?
 
2022-10-26 6:37:13 PM  
Still will have that funky smell to them
 
2022-10-26 6:58:42 PM  

solobarik: $400000 per bus?  Am I missing something here?


Taking the seatbelts and airbags out costs.
 
2022-10-26 6:59:22 PM  
 
2022-10-26 7:00:30 PM  
Article won't load for me so here's an Electric Bluebird.

Electric Light Orchestra - Bluebird (Audio)
Youtube CC5mLMOF7bo
 
2022-10-26 7:01:51 PM  

solobarik: $400000 per bus?  Am I missing something here?


I was a little surprised, but apparently that's the ballpark. "Diesel buses are the most common type of bus in the United States, and they cost around $550,000 per vehicle (according to a 2016 study)."

https://www.liveabout.com/bus-cost-to-purchase-and-operate-2798845
 
2022-10-26 7:13:17 PM  

solobarik: $400000 per bus?  Am I missing something here?


New full sized diesel school bus runs over $200k. When i worked for a transit agency like 6 years ago one of our partners was paying around $1M per electric transit bus then versus around $550k for a similar sized diesel transit bus. This doesn't seem out of line with that pricing. It doesn't account for other capital outlays for charging infrastructure, and if they don't already run overhead wire buses, then for all the related high voltage maintenance tools and safety equipment, nor for the extra fleet maintenance  staff training.
 
2022-10-26 7:40:01 PM  
Filibuster vigorously
 
2022-10-26 7:44:22 PM  
Anybody have a link that isn't borked?
 
2022-10-26 8:59:12 PM  
This is great!

I also could not follow the link, but I will just go with the flow.

When I rode a school bus to two schools, one route, from start to finish, took about 90 minutes. One way. The other route must have taken 120 minutes or more. One way. There were steep grades, dirt roads, washboarded roads. A lot of stops and a lot of turns. And that happened in ice, snow, rain, and whatever. Country clubs, ranches, chicken farms, etc. The South Park bus ride must have been very similar.

In short, forget about it. Rural or very spread out suburbs will not be friendly to E-buses.

E-buses MIGHT be good for urban and dense suburban areas, and would get rid of a lot of parents leaving their kids at school, which has got to be a huge waste. But you get a problem where a big efficient bus will have a longer route, so kids and drivers have to get up earlier. After-school activities mean that you might have to drive the whole route home with only two kids on the bus.

So guess what? Small buses, small batteries, short routes. Kind of seems to me that if you want to have a single fleet, you would be better off with smaller hybrid vehicles. If you wanted to split the fleet, put your E-buses in dense areas, hybrids in the outer part of your donut, and stick to the old diesel vehicles for longer hauls.

Which is kind of a dead horse I have been beating forever. Why make one solution fit every problem when it fits so badly? I guess a billion dollars makes even dumb ideas affordable! Free capital can often lead to bad decisions!
 
2022-10-26 9:10:18 PM  

2fardownthread: This is great!

I also could not follow the link, but I will just go with the flow.

When I rode a school bus to two schools, one route, from start to finish, took about 90 minutes. One way. The other route must have taken 120 minutes or more. One way. There were steep grades, dirt roads, washboarded roads. A lot of stops and a lot of turns. And that happened in ice, snow, rain, and whatever. Country clubs, ranches, chicken farms, etc. The South Park bus ride must have been very similar.

In short, forget about it. Rural or very spread out suburbs will not be friendly to E-buses.

E-buses MIGHT be good for urban and dense suburban areas, and would get rid of a lot of parents leaving their kids at school, which has got to be a huge waste. But you get a problem where a big efficient bus will have a longer route, so kids and drivers have to get up earlier. After-school activities mean that you might have to drive the whole route home with only two kids on the bus.

So guess what? Small buses, small batteries, short routes. Kind of seems to me that if you want to have a single fleet, you would be better off with smaller hybrid vehicles. If you wanted to split the fleet, put your E-buses in dense areas, hybrids in the outer part of your donut, and stick to the old diesel vehicles for longer hauls.

Which is kind of a dead horse I have been beating forever. Why make one solution fit every problem when it fits so badly? I guess a billion dollars makes even dumb ideas affordable! Free capital can often lead to bad decisions!


You're a farking idiot.
 
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