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(Lifehacker)   You're sautéing your vegetables wrong. Claire's words - not subby's. Hmmmm, looks like Ms C has also been peeping the farks   (lifehacker.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Cooking, hot pan, water content, Water, par-cooking, pan of mushrooms, good contact, good rule of thumb  
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875 clicks; posted to Food » on 20 Oct 2022 at 1:35 PM (14 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



35 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-10-20 1:45:38 PM  
Eat shiat raw
 
2022-10-20 1:48:14 PM  
No I'm not. I let me wife do it. Works perfect!
 
2022-10-20 1:48:36 PM  

Serious Post on Serious Thread: Eat shiat raw


I wouldn't even eat shiat cooked, not gonna eat it raw.
 
2022-10-20 1:54:55 PM  
I mean it's not wrong but it's all just stuff that's been kicking around forever pretty much.  But... people do seem to fark that up on a regular basis.  Especially the carrot thing.  Had a lot of "Ok it's sauteed veggies" stuff where the carrots were practically raw in comparison with the other ingredients - especially when someone does the fark it random sizes thing.  If you're going to cook them a long time at some point sure who cares, but just sauteing them that isn't going to work well
 
2022-10-20 1:55:54 PM  

Mikey1969: Serious Post on Serious Thread: Eat shiat raw

I wouldn't even eat shiat cooked, not gonna eat it raw.


Then yr missing out on all the vit-a-mins
 
2022-10-20 1:57:11 PM  

Serious Post on Serious Thread: Eat shiat raw


If you're serious, well no. Cooked food is more nutritious
 
2022-10-20 2:42:35 PM  
Not sure about all of them, but several of those are surprisingly correct.  Too much water = steaming instead, hot pan, relatively uniform size if you want uniform results, par cooking, all solid info.
 
2022-10-20 2:48:12 PM  

zeroflight222: Not sure about all of them, but several of those are surprisingly correct.  Too much water = steaming instead, hot pan, relatively uniform size if you want uniform results, par cooking, all solid info.


Yeah, agreed.

Usually I'm in here pretty quick with the snark for CLARE's posts. But this one was actually fairly solid.

Granted I only read the bold headings. She very well may have said some dumbass shiat that I just skimmed over.
 
2022-10-20 2:51:31 PM  

olrasputin: zeroflight222: Not sure about all of them, but several of those are surprisingly correct.  Too much water = steaming instead, hot pan, relatively uniform size if you want uniform results, par cooking, all solid info.

Yeah, agreed.

Usually I'm in here pretty quick with the snark for CLARE's posts. But this one was actually fairly solid.

Granted I only read the bold headings. She very well may have said some dumbass shiat that I just skimmed over.


I guess you missed the part where she instructs you to coat every piece of vegetable in a thin veneer of mayonnaise and to use an air fryer.
 
2022-10-20 2:53:44 PM  
 Not listed: "Don't let your mayo come to a boil"
 
jbc [TotalFark]
2022-10-20 3:02:05 PM  

Conservative Evangelical Millennial Cyclist: Not listed: "Don't let your mayo come to a boil"


Not always true. While Claire finds mayo and Diet Coke to be refreshing in the summer, a hot mayo apple cider can take the nip out of winter.
 
2022-10-20 3:08:31 PM  

anuran: Serious Post on Serious Thread: Eat shiat raw

If you're serious, well no. Cooked food is more nutritious


*sigh* Looks like we need to go over this again for the hard-of-thinking crystal enema raw bark eaters. One of the main drivers of human evolution is cooked food. Denaturing the proteins, gelatinizing starches, and weakening or breaking down cell walls yields a lot more energy per gram and vastly reduces the amount of biological energy you have to put into digestion. It's why, unlike our nearest relatives, we don't have to spend eight hours a day chewing, how we can get by with baby teeth our whole lives, and why we have lots of extra energy to devote to growing and running the stiff lump of lard at the top of our spines.

Humans do not function well on raw food. Even with fruits and veggies that have been subjected to the oldest form of biological engineering - selective breeding - for tens of thousands of years it is not compatible with an active hunter-gatherer lifestyle or even reproduction for many.

So for those of you who are even a touch more educable than a MAGAT here's an excellent book on the subject, referred to by one highly regarded biologist of my acquaintance as "The best written and most accessible review article I have read."

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-10-20 3:18:53 PM  

anuran: Serious Post on Serious Thread: Eat shiat raw

If you're serious, well no. Cooked food is more nutritious


Meh, depends on a lot of factors and what you want out of it but it seems a wash to me.  Cooking temps break down several vits. (some quickly and some very slowly) and definitely breaks down most of the enzymes.  Though there's still debate over whether those particular enzymes are even useful.  On the other hand, it increases a few other vits like various antioxidants.  Cooking also breaks down fiber & cell walls to let us absorb the remaining vits far more easily, and kills the bad bacteria & other nasties (including downright toxic stuff like in cashews or certain beans) allowing us to consume more variety of stuff.

So barring the gut biome arguments, it seems to me to be a toss-up unless you're after specific vitamins/minerals/whatever.

/i'm mainly talking unprocessed foods, like canned veggies which are pretty busted nutritionally
 
2022-10-20 3:29:53 PM  

anuran: anuran: Serious Post on Serious Thread: Eat shiat raw

If you're serious, well no. Cooked food is more nutritious

*sigh* Looks like we need to go over this again for the hard-of-thinking crystal enema raw bark eaters. One of the main drivers of human evolution is cooked food. Denaturing the proteins, gelatinizing starches, and weakening or breaking down cell walls yields a lot more energy per gram and vastly reduces the amount of biological energy you have to put into digestion. It's why, unlike our nearest relatives, we don't have to spend eight hours a day chewing, how we can get by with baby teeth our whole lives, and why we have lots of extra energy to devote to growing and running the stiff lump of lard at the top of our spines.

Humans do not function well on raw food. Even with fruits and veggies that have been subjected to the oldest form of biological engineering - selective breeding - for tens of thousands of years it is not compatible with an active hunter-gatherer lifestyle or even reproduction for many.

So for those of you who are even a touch more educable than a MAGAT here's an excellent book on the subject, referred to by one highly regarded biologist of my acquaintance as "The best written and most accessible review article I have read."

[Link][Fark user image image 335x500]


That applies to animal proteins
 
2022-10-20 3:43:39 PM  
I have this crazy idea.

Stop submitting her bullsh*t.
 
2022-10-20 4:19:15 PM  
i.redd.itView Full Size
 
2022-10-20 4:43:24 PM  

skyotter: [i.redd.it image 660x680]


If only it worked like that for all of us ;p
 
2022-10-20 5:20:05 PM  

Some Junkie Cosmonaut: skyotter: [i.redd.it image 660x680]

If only it worked like that for all of us ;p


So things like this, as well my wife's bizarre pickiness, always make me wonder what the food preference dynamic was in hunter/gatherer and early agrarian societies.

So of course there have always been degrees of preference for foods an individual likes. But say...what if you were born in 13th century Central America, but didn't like beans and corn? You think that dislike got bred out of the population over time (and thus pickiness is driven more by sheer variety in wealthy nations), or was there just a persistent chunk of the population who sucked it up, generally hated eating, but managed to otherwise participate in society and reproduce?
 
2022-10-20 5:22:16 PM  
And no. If I was stoned right now, the typing would be noticeably less coherent.
 
2022-10-20 5:44:42 PM  

Some Junkie Cosmonaut: I mean it's not wrong but it's all just stuff that's been kicking around forever pretty much.  But... people do seem to fark that up on a regular basis.  Especially the carrot thing.  Had a lot of "Ok it's sauteed veggies" stuff where the carrots were practically raw in comparison with the other ingredients - especially when someone does the fark it random sizes thing.  If you're going to cook them a long time at some point sure who cares, but just sauteing them that isn't going to work well


I recently remembered that for about a year in high school my breakfast was usually a microwave-steamed bowl of carrots with some butter and salt.

It was yummy.  I should go back to that, at least on occasion.
 
2022-10-20 5:46:38 PM  

olrasputin: Some Junkie Cosmonaut: skyotter: [i.redd.it image 660x680]

If only it worked like that for all of us ;p

So things like this, as well my wife's bizarre pickiness, always make me wonder what the food preference dynamic was in hunter/gatherer and early agrarian societies.

So of course there have always been degrees of preference for foods an individual likes. But say...what if you were born in 13th century Central America, but didn't like beans and corn? You think that dislike got bred out of the population over time (and thus pickiness is driven more by sheer variety in wealthy nations), or was there just a persistent chunk of the population who sucked it up, generally hated eating, but managed to otherwise participate in society and reproduce?


From what I've seen of the modern world, the latter.  I've consistently met outliers from all sorts of areas/cultures that did not like what their culture's food palette was - at all.  One was Taiwanese, one southern Indian, one British (understandable there) - one was from somewhere in Ghana - there were others.  All of them were quite happy to be out of their area's food culture and into American food culture, as they were ok with that unlike what they were used to having to deal with.  They just tend to either be people that do not enjoy eating much - it's just fuel/whatever - or alternatively some were more like me and just zeroed in on the things they did like and lived off of that sort of thing.  Turned down the "Ick" foods politely.  If that meant going hungry because there wasn't anything decently likable available?  Oh well - hungry it is.  Or there would be some basic thing one could manage - my Taiwanese friend was ok with congee and he ate a lot of it as it was cheap and readily available in Taiwan.  He was NOT for instance ok with rice other than congee, or a ton of Taiwanese flavors and cooking methods.  Purely anecdotal but for what it's worth

/obviously barring true starvation
//but that takes quite a while to set in
///it seems we're something of a fixture across the world - bit of a weird siblinghood but it exists as far as my experience shows
 
2022-10-20 5:49:07 PM  

zeroflight222: anuran: Serious Post on Serious Thread: Eat shiat raw

If you're serious, well no. Cooked food is more nutritious

Meh, depends on a lot of factors and what you want out of it but it seems a wash to me.  Cooking temps break down several vits. (some quickly and some very slowly) and definitely breaks down most of the enzymes.  Though there's still debate over whether those particular enzymes are even useful.  On the other hand, it increases a few other vits like various antioxidants.  Cooking also breaks down fiber & cell walls to let us absorb the remaining vits far more easily, and kills the bad bacteria & other nasties (including downright toxic stuff like in cashews or certain beans) allowing us to consume more variety of stuff.

So barring the gut biome arguments, it seems to me to be a toss-up unless you're after specific vitamins/minerals/whatever.

/i'm mainly talking unprocessed foods, like canned veggies which are pretty busted nutritionally


I hate when companies use "increased nutrient availability" as code for "we cooked the starch and now it's sugar," or "we refined the flour and now there's a higher carb:fiber ratio."
 
2022-10-20 5:51:00 PM  

rosekolodny: Some Junkie Cosmonaut: I mean it's not wrong but it's all just stuff that's been kicking around forever pretty much.  But... people do seem to fark that up on a regular basis.  Especially the carrot thing.  Had a lot of "Ok it's sauteed veggies" stuff where the carrots were practically raw in comparison with the other ingredients - especially when someone does the fark it random sizes thing.  If you're going to cook them a long time at some point sure who cares, but just sauteing them that isn't going to work well

I recently remembered that for about a year in high school my breakfast was usually a microwave-steamed bowl of carrots with some butter and salt.

It was yummy.  I should go back to that, at least on occasion.


You could certainly do vastly worse healthy meal-wise, and if you can manage healthy that you like just fine why the hell not?
 
2022-10-20 5:52:53 PM  

rosekolodny: zeroflight222: anuran: Serious Post on Serious Thread: Eat shiat raw

If you're serious, well no. Cooked food is more nutritious

Meh, depends on a lot of factors and what you want out of it but it seems a wash to me.  Cooking temps break down several vits. (some quickly and some very slowly) and definitely breaks down most of the enzymes.  Though there's still debate over whether those particular enzymes are even useful.  On the other hand, it increases a few other vits like various antioxidants.  Cooking also breaks down fiber & cell walls to let us absorb the remaining vits far more easily, and kills the bad bacteria & other nasties (including downright toxic stuff like in cashews or certain beans) allowing us to consume more variety of stuff.

So barring the gut biome arguments, it seems to me to be a toss-up unless you're after specific vitamins/minerals/whatever.

/i'm mainly talking unprocessed foods, like canned veggies which are pretty busted nutritionally

I hate when companies use "increased nutrient availability" as code for "we cooked the starch and now it's sugar," or "we refined the flour and now there's a higher carb:fiber ratio."


You, disliking weasel words?  I'm shocked, shocked I tell you ;p
 
2022-10-20 5:56:53 PM  

Some Junkie Cosmonaut: rosekolodny: Some Junkie Cosmonaut: I mean it's not wrong but it's all just stuff that's been kicking around forever pretty much.  But... people do seem to fark that up on a regular basis.  Especially the carrot thing.  Had a lot of "Ok it's sauteed veggies" stuff where the carrots were practically raw in comparison with the other ingredients - especially when someone does the fark it random sizes thing.  If you're going to cook them a long time at some point sure who cares, but just sauteing them that isn't going to work well

I recently remembered that for about a year in high school my breakfast was usually a microwave-steamed bowl of carrots with some butter and salt.

It was yummy.  I should go back to that, at least on occasion.

You could certainly do vastly worse healthy meal-wise, and if you can manage healthy that you like just fine why the hell not?


Yup.  I just.. never bought carrots for the longest time.  I would get a loosie carrot whenever I needed one for slaw, or grab a bag for a recipe, but having carrots (or celery, or potatoes) on hand was not a thing.  Today I have a bag of carrots so a bowl of buttery yum sounds good.

My fresh staples are usually more like cucumbers, lettuce, tomato, frozen spinach and peas.

Speaking of slaw, today I'm going to make some with cilantro and serranos and make it reminiscent of banh mi.  I am excited.
 
2022-10-20 6:04:24 PM  

rosekolodny: Speaking of slaw, today I'm going to make some with cilantro and serranos and make it reminiscent of banh mi. I am excited.


Certainly good potential - sounds tasty
 
2022-10-20 8:03:19 PM  

rosekolodny: Some Junkie Cosmonaut: I mean it's not wrong but it's all just stuff that's been kicking around forever pretty much.  But... people do seem to fark that up on a regular basis.  Especially the carrot thing.  Had a lot of "Ok it's sauteed veggies" stuff where the carrots were practically raw in comparison with the other ingredients - especially when someone does the fark it random sizes thing.  If you're going to cook them a long time at some point sure who cares, but just sauteing them that isn't going to work well

I recently remembered that for about a year in high school my breakfast was usually a microwave-steamed bowl of carrots with some butter and salt.

It was yummy.  I should go back to that, at least on occasion.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-10-20 9:21:16 PM  
OK...nothing too crazy there...that might be a good idea....then

Stop farking with it so much

Is Claire bipolar?
 
2022-10-20 9:49:27 PM  

ChrisDe: OK...nothing too crazy there...that might be a good idea....then

Stop farking with it so much

Is Claire bipolar?


No, but there are two Claires.  Just don't mention mayonnaise
 
2022-10-20 9:56:06 PM  
Put some pickles and mayo in the microwave for about a minute. How hard can that be?
 
2022-10-20 10:41:07 PM  
Just don't put zucchini in my stir-fry; I will hate you and key your car.
 
2022-10-21 12:37:17 AM  

olrasputin: Some Junkie Cosmonaut: skyotter: [i.redd.it image 660x680]

If only it worked like that for all of us ;p

So things like this, as well my wife's bizarre pickiness, always make me wonder what the food preference dynamic was in hunter/gatherer and early agrarian societies.

So of course there have always been degrees of preference for foods an individual likes. But say...what if you were born in 13th century Central America, but didn't like beans and corn? You think that dislike got bred out of the population over time (and thus pickiness is driven more by sheer variety in wealthy nations), or was there just a persistent chunk of the population who sucked it up, generally hated eating, but managed to otherwise participate in society and reproduce?


In the times of pre-industrial farming? You probably were grateful you had *something* to eat and ate it.
 
2022-10-21 2:13:24 AM  

sotua: olrasputin: Some Junkie Cosmonaut: skyotter: [i.redd.it image 660x680]

If only it worked like that for all of us ;p

So things like this, as well my wife's bizarre pickiness, always make me wonder what the food preference dynamic was in hunter/gatherer and early agrarian societies.

So of course there have always been degrees of preference for foods an individual likes. But say...what if you were born in 13th century Central America, but didn't like beans and corn? You think that dislike got bred out of the population over time (and thus pickiness is driven more by sheer variety in wealthy nations), or was there just a persistent chunk of the population who sucked it up, generally hated eating, but managed to otherwise participate in society and reproduce?

In the times of pre-industrial farming? You probably were grateful you had *something* to eat and ate it.


Maybe, maybe there were people kinda like me that just ate pease porridge or something 'cause they hated turnips.  Who the heck knows?  Stuff like that is pretty much up in the air barring the development of time machines or similar
 
jbc [TotalFark]
2022-10-21 9:22:50 AM  

iron_city_ap: Put some pickles and mayo in the microwave

air fryer for about a minute. How hard can that be?

FTFY
 
2022-10-21 12:39:43 PM  

rosekolodny: Some Junkie Cosmonaut: rosekolodny: Some Junkie Cosmonaut: I mean it's not wrong but it's all just stuff that's been kicking around forever pretty much.  But... people do seem to fark that up on a regular basis.  Especially the carrot thing.  Had a lot of "Ok it's sauteed veggies" stuff where the carrots were practically raw in comparison with the other ingredients - especially when someone does the fark it random sizes thing.  If you're going to cook them a long time at some point sure who cares, but just sauteing them that isn't going to work well

I recently remembered that for about a year in high school my breakfast was usually a microwave-steamed bowl of carrots with some butter and salt.

It was yummy.  I should go back to that, at least on occasion.

You could certainly do vastly worse healthy meal-wise, and if you can manage healthy that you like just fine why the hell not?

Yup.  I just.. never bought carrots for the longest time.  I would get a loosie carrot whenever I needed one for slaw, or grab a bag for a recipe, but having carrots (or celery, or potatoes) on hand was not a thing.  Today I have a bag of carrots so a bowl of buttery yum sounds good.

My fresh staples are usually more like cucumbers, lettuce, tomato, frozen spinach and peas.

Speaking of slaw, today I'm going to make some with cilantro and serranos and make it reminiscent of banh mi.  I am excited.


I love a banh mi. I'm curious as to how the slaw turned out.
 
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