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(GeekWire)   Well maybe make your city more affordable and people will stay and generate tax revenue?   (geekwire.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, Tax, Seattle, Geekwire Seattle Mayor Bruce Harrell, growth of the regional economy, Tech companies, Harrell's 2023-2024 budget proposal, city's retail businesses, Seattle Mayor Bruce Harrell  
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2653 clicks; posted to Politics » on 07 Oct 2022 at 9:22 AM (8 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-10-07 8:52:46 AM  
This can apply to almost anywhere. You will see more of this unless the company says you need to report at least once a week or two.
 
2022-10-07 8:56:38 AM  
Or, and stick with me here, just Tax the Corporations who are are now making more money because they aren't buying/building/maintaining office space.

Yeah Yeah I know, CRAZY right?  Taxes are only for the poors
 
2022-10-07 9:17:45 AM  
I guess this is the latest excuse to try to get workers back into the office? Got to have those butts in those seats.  God, in glad im retiring from office career at the end of the year.
 
2022-10-07 9:24:24 AM  
Yes perhaps the mayor could build large housing projects for affordable housing.  That has worked out in the past hasn't it?
 
2022-10-07 9:24:54 AM  
Washington doesn't even have an income tax. Because even liberal rich people are selfish assholes.
 
2022-10-07 9:26:41 AM  
I love this;
"People doing what they want to do isn't making me enough money! We need to force people to do what they did before!"
 
2022-10-07 9:26:54 AM  

SpaceMonkey-66: I guess this is the latest excuse to try to get workers back into the office? Got to have those butts in those seats.  God, in glad im retiring from office career at the end of the year.


Middle management is dying for cubicle farms to police, useless meetings to convene, work spaces to snoop in, politics to play. It's harder to contribute nothing via Zoom.
 
2022-10-07 9:32:50 AM  
Public transit is having a hell of a time as well. Ridership is still nowhere near peak.
 
2022-10-07 9:32:57 AM  

ColleenSezWhuut: Yes perhaps the mayor could build large housing projects for affordable housing.  That has worked out in the past hasn't it?


I can't decide if you're looking for bites on this, or what kind of bites.

Because yes. Every city does need much more affordable housing
 
2022-10-07 9:33:47 AM  
WA eliminated their (progressive) income tax.  They get the majority of revenue from (regressive) sales tax.  No idea what the problem with that could be.
 
2022-10-07 9:33:51 AM  
Or maybe appropriately tax and regulate real estate to keep rich assholes and hedge funds from buying up properties and letting the properties sit vacant and unoccupied for years on end for significant tax breaks that make more money than fixing up and renting those properties at market value?

Crazy idea, I know.
 
2022-10-07 9:35:51 AM  
Irony:  City whose economy is based on emerging technology is caught unaware by the impact of emerging technology
 
2022-10-07 9:37:13 AM  
"Make the city more affordable" ? How is that supposed to work, exactly?

The only room the city really has to manouevre is around rent control and social housing, neither of which are particularly palatable for existing owners who have property values to protect. And it's not like the city is going to take up price controls on coffee and pizza.

Instead of being concerned about tax revenues, the city should be looking about what costs they can now cut given the lack of people coming downtown. Can we now look at dismantling some of the expensive to maintain infrastructure that serviced all of that commuter traffic each direction? This should be an opportunity to eliminate huge highways and broad avenues and replace them with light rail, electric buses, and more pedestrian and bike-friendly infrastructure that costs far less to maintain.

But we can't do that, of course. Politicians like power, and having a smaller budget would mean less of it.
 
2022-10-07 9:38:18 AM  

Outshined_One: Or maybe appropriately tax and regulate real estate to keep rich assholes and hedge funds from buying up properties and letting the properties sit vacant and unoccupied for years on end for significant tax breaks that make more money than fixing up and renting those properties at market value?

Crazy idea, I know.


How does an empty property with no renter make money for its owner?
 
2022-10-07 9:41:54 AM  

austerity101: Washington doesn't even have an income tax. Because even liberal rich people are selfish assholes.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-10-07 9:44:44 AM  

Gubbo: ColleenSezWhuut: Yes perhaps the mayor could build large housing projects for affordable housing.  That has worked out in the past hasn't it?

I can't decide if you're looking for bites on this, or what kind of bites.

Because yes. Every city does need much more affordable housing


The point is that public housing projects have a long history of not bringing about utopia.
 
2022-10-07 9:45:18 AM  
Yes making cities cheaper will make me want to stop remoting into work and start making me want to spend significant amounts of time and money commuting and buying lunch.

Yeah, that'll do it. I really miss traffic.
 
2022-10-07 9:45:50 AM  

ColleenSezWhuut: Gubbo: ColleenSezWhuut: Yes perhaps the mayor could build large housing projects for affordable housing.  That has worked out in the past hasn't it?

I can't decide if you're looking for bites on this, or what kind of bites.

Because yes. Every city does need much more affordable housing

The point is that public housing projects have a long history of not bringing about utopia.


So you're saying that affordable housing is bad because in the past it was done in a bad (and presumably racist) way.

Well then clearly it can never be done in a way that would work. Thank you for services.
 
2022-10-07 9:47:29 AM  

ColleenSezWhuut: Gubbo: ColleenSezWhuut: Yes perhaps the mayor could build large housing projects for affordable housing.  That has worked out in the past hasn't it?

I can't decide if you're looking for bites on this, or what kind of bites.

Because yes. Every city does need much more affordable housing

The point is that public housing projects have a long history of not bringing about utopia.


Nor does a lack of them. But you know that.

/the problem isn't the projects, but the details therein and their implementation. But you also knew that.
 
2022-10-07 9:47:45 AM  

ColleenSezWhuut: Gubbo: ColleenSezWhuut: Yes perhaps the mayor could build large housing projects for affordable housing.  That has worked out in the past hasn't it?

I can't decide if you're looking for bites on this, or what kind of bites.

Because yes. Every city does need much more affordable housing

The point is that public housing projects have a long history of not bringing about utopia.


Utopia? You're trolling is a little too obvious
 
2022-10-07 9:48:07 AM  
We have several Fortune 500 companies in town with office buildings as large 500,000 square feet and their employees aren't coming back to the office after COVID.  The office vacancy rate for our region is 40% and growing.  They are scraping $60 million buildings to put up apartments and warehouses.  Thankfully, there are manufacturing startups and some actual re-shoring that mix up what would otherwise be an entirely service-based economy.  If not for marijuana products, walk-in clinics, salons, coffee, and stiff competition in home goods sales, there would be similar retail vacancy rates.
 
2022-10-07 9:48:43 AM  

Gubbo: ColleenSezWhuut: Gubbo: ColleenSezWhuut: Yes perhaps the mayor could build large housing projects for affordable housing.  That has worked out in the past hasn't it?

I can't decide if you're looking for bites on this, or what kind of bites.

Because yes. Every city does need much more affordable housing

The point is that public housing projects have a long history of not bringing about utopia.

So you're saying that affordable housing is bad because in the past it was done in a bad (and presumably racist) way.

Well then clearly it can never be done in a way that would work. Thank you for services.


You know?  You're right.  Obviously we simply need to try harder and maybe it'll work this time just like trickle down economics.
 
2022-10-07 9:48:45 AM  

Outshined_One: Or maybe appropriately tax and regulate real estate to keep rich assholes and hedge funds from buying up properties and letting the properties sit vacant and unoccupied for years on end for significant tax breaks that make more money than fixing up and renting those properties at market value?

Crazy idea, I know.


An excellent idea - punitive property taxes on homes that are not occupied as a primary place of residence are the norm many places. I guess the difficultly would be in taking that further and proving that the house and any residents. How do you prove X number of nights per year have someone sleeping there?
 
2022-10-07 9:48:48 AM  
I also really miss having to deal with annoying coworkers who won't sit down and work and instead talk to me for upwards of an hour or more.
 
2022-10-07 9:49:37 AM  
Downtown cores should embrace the idea of being "urban amusement parks" and transition to being weekend attractors.  The jobs aren't coming back, but if you can pack your mass transit Friday night through Sunday night, it's something.
 
2022-10-07 9:52:18 AM  

ColleenSezWhuut: Gubbo: ColleenSezWhuut: Gubbo: ColleenSezWhuut: Yes perhaps the mayor could build large housing projects for affordable housing.  That has worked out in the past hasn't it?

I can't decide if you're looking for bites on this, or what kind of bites.

Because yes. Every city does need much more affordable housing

The point is that public housing projects have a long history of not bringing about utopia.

So you're saying that affordable housing is bad because in the past it was done in a bad (and presumably racist) way.

Well then clearly it can never be done in a way that would work. Thank you for services.

You know?  You're right.  Obviously we simply need to try harder and maybe it'll work this time just like trickle down economics.


Nice knowing you.
 
2022-10-07 9:55:29 AM  
My company closed their satellite office in Seattle earlier this year.  The employees went full time remote because no one was comfortable working out of the office because the homeless and drug problem was getting to be too much.

I haven't been there in 20 years, but I recall it was pretty bad back then as well.
 
2022-10-07 9:55:52 AM  

Shaggy_C: "Make the city more affordable" ? How is that supposed to work, exactly?

The only room the city really has to manouevre is around rent control and social housing, neither of which are particularly palatable for existing owners who have property values to protect. And it's not like the city is going to take up price controls on coffee and pizza.

Instead of being concerned about tax revenues, the city should be looking about what costs they can now cut given the lack of people coming downtown. Can we now look at dismantling some of the expensive to maintain infrastructure that serviced all of that commuter traffic each direction? This should be an opportunity to eliminate huge highways and broad avenues and replace them with light rail, electric buses, and more pedestrian and bike-friendly infrastructure that costs far less to maintain.

But we can't do that, of course. Politicians like power, and having a smaller budget would mean less of it.


We should institute a vegan tax.
 
2022-10-07 9:57:01 AM  
Who would want to return almost any downtown office. Seattle totals pale to many other big cities but "Seattle police continue to report an extreme rise in gun violence and homicides. According to Detective Valarie Carson, there were 11 reported homicides in the city. The Seattle Times states this is the most the city has seen in a month in almost 15 years."

"Diaz says at least 25% of the homicides reported in 2022 have some link to homeless encampments across the city.
And at the current rate, he thinks Seattle could set new records in reported shootings and homicides."

https://www.kiro7.com/news/local/seattle-police-continue-see-alarming-rise-homicides-gun-violence/IGPW7OIU3VFKXL3CYJL2STIQGE/
 
2022-10-07 9:57:14 AM  

qorkfiend: Outshined_One: Or maybe appropriately tax and regulate real estate to keep rich assholes and hedge funds from buying up properties and letting the properties sit vacant and unoccupied for years on end for significant tax breaks that make more money than fixing up and renting those properties at market value?

Crazy idea, I know.

How does an empty property with no renter make money for its owner?


A few different bases, depending on your jurisdiction. One, depreciation of property value can be a significant write-off for investors (it's the sort of shiat FPOTUS pulled per the NYAG in the recent tax fraud Civil suit); you can typically get away with claiming depreciation if the property sits uninhabited for extended periods of time. Two, depending on your jurisdiction, you can qualify for tax breaks and writeoffs if your property sits vacant for extended periods of time.

Again, it's an economic decision, but it makes sense in a number of contexts to buy a property at bottom, let it sit unoccupied for the tax breaks for a few years, and then bring it up to code and sell it off at the top of market. Sometimes you make more money than leasing.
 
2022-10-07 9:59:40 AM  
Cities are going to have to change focus, and Seattle will be hit hard in the beginning of the transition as they have several companies that align themselves with remote work. Old city philosophy was that you needed to get employers, then they brought employees with them. So you prioritized things towards companies. Now you need to prioritize things to bring people in regardless of work. Zone more housing to bring down costs, transform those downtown skyscrapers in to mixed use condos with storefronts on the street. Increase walkable areas, more parks, focus on schools, focus on good policing, focus on entertainment and convenience. If you do it right you'll end up with more dense urban areas. You're getting rid of inefficienct 9-5 only work buildings and replacing it with housing, more people more tax revenue from property tax and sales tax, more dense urban areas will have the ability to provide more amenities than sparsely populated areas and will thrive if properly managed
 
2022-10-07 9:59:41 AM  
Perhaps get rid of all the naked butts and make downtown attractive for everyone again? People live downtown in other countries, you know. And by live I don't mean bathroom in the gutter, bedroom under a tarp.
 
2022-10-07 10:00:09 AM  

Outshined_One: qorkfiend: Outshined_One: Or maybe appropriately tax and regulate real estate to keep rich assholes and hedge funds from buying up properties and letting the properties sit vacant and unoccupied for years on end for significant tax breaks that make more money than fixing up and renting those properties at market value?

Crazy idea, I know.

How does an empty property with no renter make money for its owner?

A few different bases, depending on your jurisdiction. One, depreciation of property value can be a significant write-off for investors (it's the sort of shiat FPOTUS pulled per the NYAG in the recent tax fraud Civil suit); you can typically get away with claiming depreciation if the property sits uninhabited for extended periods of time. Two, depending on your jurisdiction, you can qualify for tax breaks and writeoffs if your property sits vacant for extended periods of time.

Again, it's an economic decision, but it makes sense in a number of contexts to buy a property at bottom, let it sit unoccupied for the tax breaks for a few years, and then bring it up to code and sell it off at the top of market. Sometimes you make more money than leasing.


Yeah, no one sits on an empty property for "depreciation" and no one gets tax breaks for simply owning a property that aren't balanced elsewhere.
 
2022-10-07 10:03:42 AM  

willwall: Cities are going to have to change focus, and Seattle will be hit hard in the beginning of the transition as they have several companies that align themselves with remote work. Old city philosophy was that you needed to get employers, then they brought employees with them. So you prioritized things towards companies. Now you need to prioritize things to bring people in regardless of work. Zone more housing to bring down costs, transform those downtown skyscrapers in to mixed use condos with storefronts on the street. Increase walkable areas, more parks, focus on schools, focus on good policing, focus on entertainment and convenience. If you do it right you'll end up with more dense urban areas. You're getting rid of inefficienct 9-5 only work buildings and replacing it with housing, more people more tax revenue from property tax and sales tax, more dense urban areas will have the ability to provide more amenities than sparsely populated areas and will thrive if properly managed


Instead they will just hand out needles and let people shoot up and shiat on the sidewalk.
 
2022-10-07 10:05:41 AM  

lilplatinum: willwall: Cities are going to have to change focus, and Seattle will be hit hard in the beginning of the transition as they have several companies that align themselves with remote work. Old city philosophy was that you needed to get employers, then they brought employees with them. So you prioritized things towards companies. Now you need to prioritize things to bring people in regardless of work. Zone more housing to bring down costs, transform those downtown skyscrapers in to mixed use condos with storefronts on the street. Increase walkable areas, more parks, focus on schools, focus on good policing, focus on entertainment and convenience. If you do it right you'll end up with more dense urban areas. You're getting rid of inefficienct 9-5 only work buildings and replacing it with housing, more people more tax revenue from property tax and sales tax, more dense urban areas will have the ability to provide more amenities than sparsely populated areas and will thrive if properly managed

Instead they will just hand out needles and let people shoot up and shiat on the sidewalk.


This is the correct thing to do. Far far cheaper than dealing with the consequences of dirty needles and sharing.

I mean clearly it should be done in conjunction with other public health initiatives, but not treating addicts as criminals and scum is a very good first step in dealing with and treating addiction.
 
2022-10-07 10:06:20 AM  

willwall: Cities are going to have to change focus, and Seattle will be hit hard in the beginning of the transition as they have several companies that align themselves with remote work. Old city philosophy was that you needed to get employers, then they brought employees with them. So you prioritized things towards companies. Now you need to prioritize things to bring people in regardless of work. Zone more housing to bring down costs, transform those downtown skyscrapers in to mixed use condos with storefronts on the street. Increase walkable areas, more parks, focus on schools, focus on good policing, focus on entertainment and convenience. If you do it right you'll end up with more dense urban areas. You're getting rid of inefficienct 9-5 only work buildings and replacing it with housing, more people more tax revenue from property tax and sales tax, more dense urban areas will have the ability to provide more amenities than sparsely populated areas and will thrive if properly managed


The big issue is that people aren't going to live in the urban areas if the urban areas don't have lots and lots of jobs.
 
2022-10-07 10:07:45 AM  

Halfabee64: We have several Fortune 500 companies in town with office buildings as large 500,000 square feet and their employees aren't coming back to the office after COVID.  The office vacancy rate for our region is 40% and growing.  They are scraping $60 million buildings to put up apartments and warehouses.  Thankfully, there are manufacturing startups and some actual re-shoring that mix up what would otherwise be an entirely service-based economy.  If not for marijuana products, walk-in clinics, salons, coffee, and stiff competition in home goods sales, there would be similar retail vacancy rates.


If you convert a significant portion of that empty space to residential you can a. Get rid of vacancy, b. Bring in more customers to the retail in the area. C. Reduce over inflated home values to more reasonable prices.

This is a once in a (multi)generation opportunity to redesign your city on the cheap.
 
2022-10-07 10:07:56 AM  

Gubbo: lilplatinum: willwall: Cities are going to have to change focus, and Seattle will be hit hard in the beginning of the transition as they have several companies that align themselves with remote work. Old city philosophy was that you needed to get employers, then they brought employees with them. So you prioritized things towards companies. Now you need to prioritize things to bring people in regardless of work. Zone more housing to bring down costs, transform those downtown skyscrapers in to mixed use condos with storefronts on the street. Increase walkable areas, more parks, focus on schools, focus on good policing, focus on entertainment and convenience. If you do it right you'll end up with more dense urban areas. You're getting rid of inefficienct 9-5 only work buildings and replacing it with housing, more people more tax revenue from property tax and sales tax, more dense urban areas will have the ability to provide more amenities than sparsely populated areas and will thrive if properly managed

Instead they will just hand out needles and let people shoot up and shiat on the sidewalk.

This is the correct thing to do. Far far cheaper than dealing with the consequences of dirty needles and sharing.

I mean clearly it should be done in conjunction with other public health initiatives, but not treating addicts as criminals and scum is a very good first step in dealing with and treating addiction.


Easy to say when you don't live in an area full of the scum.  Sorry, I did my time in Brooklyn living near a methadone clinic. Want to facilitate their addiction safely, fine, ship em out to the country where they aren't up in the taxpayers shiat and give em all the fenny they want.  Hamsterdam the shiat out of it.
 
2022-10-07 10:08:23 AM  

Shakin_Haitian: I also really miss having to deal with annoying coworkers who won't sit down and work and instead talk to me for upwards of an hour or more.


What is that phenomenon.  There are two guys on my team that would talk until we're dead and decomposed if left to it.  The only way to get out of it is to cut off the conversation mid thought and walk away or hang up. Could be at 3 in the morning at the end of a maintenance, they will never end a conversation on their own.
 
2022-10-07 10:09:20 AM  

qorkfiend: willwall: Cities are going to have to change focus, and Seattle will be hit hard in the beginning of the transition as they have several companies that align themselves with remote work. Old city philosophy was that you needed to get employers, then they brought employees with them. So you prioritized things towards companies. Now you need to prioritize things to bring people in regardless of work. Zone more housing to bring down costs, transform those downtown skyscrapers in to mixed use condos with storefronts on the street. Increase walkable areas, more parks, focus on schools, focus on good policing, focus on entertainment and convenience. If you do it right you'll end up with more dense urban areas. You're getting rid of inefficienct 9-5 only work buildings and replacing it with housing, more people more tax revenue from property tax and sales tax, more dense urban areas will have the ability to provide more amenities than sparsely populated areas and will thrive if properly managed

The big issue is that people aren't going to live in the urban areas if the urban areas don't have lots and lots of jobs.


That's literally the opposite of what's happening. People don't need as many local jobs, they can get remote ones.
 
2022-10-07 10:09:26 AM  

lilplatinum: Gubbo: lilplatinum: willwall: Cities are going to have to change focus, and Seattle will be hit hard in the beginning of the transition as they have several companies that align themselves with remote work. Old city philosophy was that you needed to get employers, then they brought employees with them. So you prioritized things towards companies. Now you need to prioritize things to bring people in regardless of work. Zone more housing to bring down costs, transform those downtown skyscrapers in to mixed use condos with storefronts on the street. Increase walkable areas, more parks, focus on schools, focus on good policing, focus on entertainment and convenience. If you do it right you'll end up with more dense urban areas. You're getting rid of inefficienct 9-5 only work buildings and replacing it with housing, more people more tax revenue from property tax and sales tax, more dense urban areas will have the ability to provide more amenities than sparsely populated areas and will thrive if properly managed

Instead they will just hand out needles and let people shoot up and shiat on the sidewalk.

This is the correct thing to do. Far far cheaper than dealing with the consequences of dirty needles and sharing.

I mean clearly it should be done in conjunction with other public health initiatives, but not treating addicts as criminals and scum is a very good first step in dealing with and treating addiction.

Easy to say when you don't live in an area full of the scum.  Sorry, I did my time in Brooklyn living near a methadone clinic. Want to facilitate their addiction safely, fine, ship em out to the country where they aren't up in the taxpayers shiat and give em all the fenny they want.  Hamsterdam the shiat out of it.


Just get the undesirables out of your sight and you'll be happy.
 
2022-10-07 10:09:29 AM  
Mandate the vaccine.

Save the economy.

You can say "we're open, no masks", but movie tickets make it clear: 50% of the population has noped out of the optional economy.
 
2022-10-07 10:09:35 AM  

lilplatinum: We should institute a vegan tax.


Nah, that would disproportionately hurt current residents. We should be soaking the tourists for everything we can get; that means fish tax.
 
2022-10-07 10:09:57 AM  

willwall: qorkfiend: willwall: Cities are going to have to change focus, and Seattle will be hit hard in the beginning of the transition as they have several companies that align themselves with remote work. Old city philosophy was that you needed to get employers, then they brought employees with them. So you prioritized things towards companies. Now you need to prioritize things to bring people in regardless of work. Zone more housing to bring down costs, transform those downtown skyscrapers in to mixed use condos with storefronts on the street. Increase walkable areas, more parks, focus on schools, focus on good policing, focus on entertainment and convenience. If you do it right you'll end up with more dense urban areas. You're getting rid of inefficienct 9-5 only work buildings and replacing it with housing, more people more tax revenue from property tax and sales tax, more dense urban areas will have the ability to provide more amenities than sparsely populated areas and will thrive if properly managed

The big issue is that people aren't going to live in the urban areas if the urban areas don't have lots and lots of jobs.

That's literally the opposite of what's happening. People don't need as many local jobs, they can get remote ones.


Some people can. Most of them were already not living in the cities.
 
2022-10-07 10:10:09 AM  

qorkfiend: lilplatinum: Gubbo: lilplatinum: willwall: Cities are going to have to change focus, and Seattle will be hit hard in the beginning of the transition as they have several companies that align themselves with remote work. Old city philosophy was that you needed to get employers, then they brought employees with them. So you prioritized things towards companies. Now you need to prioritize things to bring people in regardless of work. Zone more housing to bring down costs, transform those downtown skyscrapers in to mixed use condos with storefronts on the street. Increase walkable areas, more parks, focus on schools, focus on good policing, focus on entertainment and convenience. If you do it right you'll end up with more dense urban areas. You're getting rid of inefficienct 9-5 only work buildings and replacing it with housing, more people more tax revenue from property tax and sales tax, more dense urban areas will have the ability to provide more amenities than sparsely populated areas and will thrive if properly managed

Instead they will just hand out needles and let people shoot up and shiat on the sidewalk.

This is the correct thing to do. Far far cheaper than dealing with the consequences of dirty needles and sharing.

I mean clearly it should be done in conjunction with other public health initiatives, but not treating addicts as criminals and scum is a very good first step in dealing with and treating addiction.

Easy to say when you don't live in an area full of the scum.  Sorry, I did my time in Brooklyn living near a methadone clinic. Want to facilitate their addiction safely, fine, ship em out to the country where they aren't up in the taxpayers shiat and give em all the fenny they want.  Hamsterdam the shiat out of it.

Just get the undesirables out of your sight and you'll be happy.


As opposed to shiatting in front of my door and digging through my trash at night?  Absofarkinglutely
 
2022-10-07 10:10:55 AM  
It's a legit concern. Cities are going to see a massive change in the coming years. Remote work means we don't have to live on top of each other anymore. That's bad for downtowns everywhere.

For the record, I'm completely pro remote work. I've quit jobs that took it away. But that doesn't mean there aren't some downsides to manage.
 
2022-10-07 10:11:09 AM  

Shaggy_C: lilplatinum: We should institute a vegan tax.

Nah, that would disproportionately hurt current residents. We should be soaking the tourists for everything we can get; that means fish tax.


Anyone who doesn't eat what I did last night doesn't deserve to keep their money.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-10-07 10:11:13 AM  

lilplatinum: qorkfiend: lilplatinum: Gubbo: lilplatinum: willwall: Cities are going to have to change focus, and Seattle will be hit hard in the beginning of the transition as they have several companies that align themselves with remote work. Old city philosophy was that you needed to get employers, then they brought employees with them. So you prioritized things towards companies. Now you need to prioritize things to bring people in regardless of work. Zone more housing to bring down costs, transform those downtown skyscrapers in to mixed use condos with storefronts on the street. Increase walkable areas, more parks, focus on schools, focus on good policing, focus on entertainment and convenience. If you do it right you'll end up with more dense urban areas. You're getting rid of inefficienct 9-5 only work buildings and replacing it with housing, more people more tax revenue from property tax and sales tax, more dense urban areas will have the ability to provide more amenities than sparsely populated areas and will thrive if properly managed

Instead they will just hand out needles and let people shoot up and shiat on the sidewalk.

This is the correct thing to do. Far far cheaper than dealing with the consequences of dirty needles and sharing.

I mean clearly it should be done in conjunction with other public health initiatives, but not treating addicts as criminals and scum is a very good first step in dealing with and treating addiction.

Easy to say when you don't live in an area full of the scum.  Sorry, I did my time in Brooklyn living near a methadone clinic. Want to facilitate their addiction safely, fine, ship em out to the country where they aren't up in the taxpayers shiat and give em all the fenny they want.  Hamsterdam the shiat out of it.

Just get the undesirables out of your sight and you'll be happy.

As opposed to shiatting in front of my door and digging through my trash at night?  Absofarkinglutely


It's funny how shiatty things suddenly make sense when they're doing something you want
 
2022-10-07 10:12:50 AM  
Another out of touch mayor in Seattle.  I'm glad we got rid of Durkan but have no faith in Harrell.
 
2022-10-07 10:13:37 AM  

qorkfiend: As opposed to shiatting in front of my door and digging through my trash at night?  Absofarkinglutely

It's funny how shiatty things suddenly make sense when they're doing something you want


It's funny how everyone who doesn't have junkies swarming outside their front door seems to be a lot more permissive of them.

Treatments fine, allowing them free range is a super way to make a faltering downtown area revitalized.
 
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