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(Fortune)   Covid may not kill you up front, but appears to be bulldozing through young and healthy cardiovascular systems which leads to the same final destination   (fortune.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Myocardial infarction, history of COVID, Vaccination, typical risk factors, large international study, Immune system, mild cases of infection, COVID's reach  
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1069 clicks; posted to STEM » on 06 Oct 2022 at 10:31 PM (8 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



24 Comments     (+0 »)
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2022-10-06 9:53:57 PM  
Hi. I'm the Farker that wrote about surviving COVID in March of 2020. Turns out surviving the initial infection is the START of things, not the end.

If you feel sunburn in your legs / calves, or chest pain, immediately get checked out.

I was lucky to survive the initial infection, then MIS-A when I was discharged from Hospital. The Docs didn't tell me at the time I went home, that they thought my chances of making it were shaky at best. I was told point blank that I almost died twice six months after initial infection. My resting pulserate for those six months was 136-138.

Had I not been put on bloodthinners in ICU, I probably wouldn't be typing this.

Then I had tachycardia / arrhythmia. Tests showed nothing. Shortness of breath, insane levels of muscle weakness, tiredness. Phantom pains.

Then in October of 2021, I felt incredible sunburn in my left calf. As my former employer had nixed our health insurance, I couldn't go into Hospital or Urgent Care. I started taking aspirin daily in the hopes it would help be 'enough' of a bloodthinner.

Then, two weeks after the DVT in my calf, it vanished. Week three I came home from selling possessions to pay for rent and Ollie's teeth, because again, said former Boss was late with my Paycheck.

It started as a backache. Near my right shoulderblade. I was driving Hobbes the Fleetwood home from selling things and I couldn't believe the size of the knot in my back, how it hurt.

I came home, got onto the bed to take my shoes off after greeting Mrs. Z and it was like someone shot me.

I keeled over, I couldn't breathe. The pain was acute, intense and glittering, as if I'd been skewered on a bayonet. I forced in a breath. Then another. Then another.

Having had lung issues from COVID, I was well familiar with the benefits of using a Spirometer. I stood up, Kris looking alarmed, and forced in pain to take ten measured breaths with the Spirometer.

My entire back hurt. I couldn't lie down as it felt like connective tissue inside my ribcage was pulling itself apart. This lasted two weeks.

I slept in the front room, away from Kris, bolt upright on the leather couch that I'd previously nursed myself back to health on when I was released from ICU.

The pain was incredible, I was forced to use Belladonna-laced pain relieving patches all up and down my right side on my back (these are not exotic, they're a British pain-relieving staple).

For a week I coughed up clots. One as big as a dime. Apparently the DVT had turned into a full blown PE that then passed through the vasculature of my right lung.

Thanks to the Healthcare Marketplace, I was able to purchase my own health insurance. I went to see my regular doctor. She stood there, and I could see her turning pale the more I shared. I showed her the pictures of the clots I had coughed up on my phone.

"Znuh." She replied, calmly. "You know how you used up two of your nine lives with COVID?" I nodded. "You just had, and survived a Pulmonary Embolism. You should be dead. Again. We're going to start calling you Doctor Katz."

And then she instantly had me whisked off for an ultrasound, followed with a CATScan, which showed that yes, I'd survived a PE.

That ended with three more CATscans over a six month period. I was immediately put on Lovenox for a week. Now, Lovenox only works if it's injected into your stomach. I was given 28 syringes and told to inject this into my stomach, two syringes, twice daily.

You haven't lived until you've been given a VERY LARGE syringe and told that you, yourself have to inject this into your stomach. Then do it again. Then later that day do it once more. And Lovenox BURNS as it sinks into you.

Then it was six months of Warfarin, getting a 'groovy' chunky chrome medalert bracelet, and going in twice a week to dial in the dose.

Learning that leafy greens were out. That nuts were out. That all sorts of food that you thought were fine contribute to your clotting factor. When you're on bloodthinners, everything has to be watched. 

COVID infected my entire body. It went after my heart, lungs, kidneys and liver, and caused bright flashing in my eyes, as well as arresting my sense of smell and taste.

Surviving the initial infection was just the beginning.

It is still here, it doesn't fsck around. it's bloody nasty. Horrifying.

We're still in a pandemic. It's not over. Don't eat the FUD that's out there that suggests we're in the clear.

Take steps. Protect yourself.
 
2022-10-06 10:37:00 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-10-06 10:40:41 PM  

Znuh: Hi. I'm the Farker that wrote about surviving COVID in March of 2020. Turns out surviving the initial infection is the START of things, not the end.

If you feel sunburn in your legs / calves, or chest pain, immediately get checked out.

I was lucky to survive the initial infection, then MIS-A when I was discharged from Hospital. The Docs didn't tell me at the time I went home, that they thought my chances of making it were shaky at best. I was told point blank that I almost died twice six months after initial infection. My resting pulserate for those six months was 136-138.

Had I not been put on bloodthinners in ICU, I probably wouldn't be typing this.

Then I had tachycardia / arrhythmia. Tests showed nothing. Shortness of breath, insane levels of muscle weakness, tiredness. Phantom pains.

Then in October of 2021, I felt incredible sunburn in my left calf. As my former employer had nixed our health insurance, I couldn't go into Hospital or Urgent Care. I started taking aspirin daily in the hopes it would help be 'enough' of a bloodthinner.

Then, two weeks after the DVT in my calf, it vanished. Week three I came home from selling possessions to pay for rent and Ollie's teeth, because again, said former Boss was late with my Paycheck.

It started as a backache. Near my right shoulderblade. I was driving Hobbes the Fleetwood home from selling things and I couldn't believe the size of the knot in my back, how it hurt.

I came home, got onto the bed to take my shoes off after greeting Mrs. Z and it was like someone shot me.

I keeled over, I couldn't breathe. The pain was acute, intense and glittering, as if I'd been skewered on a bayonet. I forced in a breath. Then another. Then another.

Having had lung issues from COVID, I was well familiar with the benefits of using a Spirometer. I stood up, Kris looking alarmed, and forced in pain to take ten measured breaths with the Spirometer.

My entire back hurt. I couldn't lie down as it felt like connective tissue inside ...


Internet hugs and best wishes to you.

I had a good friend die of COVID. It was two weeks after he was discharged from hospital. A researcher described it as "more of a venom than a virus" in the way it attacks tissue.
 
2022-10-06 10:47:07 PM  
Sim Tree:

I am so very sorry, I have no words. I wouldn't wish iat on anyone.
 
2022-10-06 10:55:49 PM  
One year ago I had covid. It was mild.  I was fully vaxxed and basically I just had a low grade fever that lasted a couple of days and I lost my sense of smell and taste for a couple weeks.  That was it. A couple month ago I suddenly got tachycardia. Incidents of rapid pounding heart along with PVCs and skipped heartbeats.  I got on metoprolol and got it under control, mostly.

Was it covid caused?  I have no idea.  I do know that it now takes a ridiculously long time to get in to see a cardiologist no matter how bad your problem is because covid has caused a huge uptick in heart problems.  I got lucky because the morning I called in to get an appointment my future doctor had just called in and opened up a few appointments and I just lucked into being the first person to call after she did.
 
2022-10-06 11:06:33 PM  

Noah_Tall: One year ago I had covid. It was mild.  I was fully vaxxed and basically I just had a low grade fever that lasted a couple of days and I lost my sense of smell and taste for a couple weeks.  That was it. A couple month ago I suddenly got tachycardia. Incidents of rapid pounding heart along with PVCs and skipped heartbeats.  I got on metoprolol and got it under control, mostly.

Was it covid caused?  I have no idea.  I do know that it now takes a ridiculously long time to get in to see a cardiologist no matter how bad your problem is because covid has caused a huge uptick in heart problems.  I got lucky because the morning I called in to get an appointment my future doctor had just called in and opened up a few appointments and I just lucked into being the first person to call after she did.


My PE was 1.5 years after Covid. Doc said it was entirely due to having Covid earlier. 

Glad you got it seen to, hang in there.
 
2022-10-06 11:48:48 PM  
Joe Biden declared the pandemic over before we got long covid, etc. figured out.

We have a huge chunk of the population who believes it's over because they want it to be over and they're tired of it, completely desensitized to a 9/11's worth of deaths (min) every week.

Don't mention it to them - they don't want to be reminded.
 
2022-10-07 12:39:40 AM  
I've been exposed to just about every major first-world variant so far with various symptom manifestations. G-strain, alpha, delta, BA1, 2, 4, and 5; each of them having it's own unique symptoms. The first two were so slight that anyone not knowing what they were dealing with would have considered them to be asymptomatic cases.

Alpha was interesting all on it's own, I remember breathing in and suddenly feeling like I snorted powdered, electric glass. 6 hours later on the dot I suddenly had the first sinus headache of my life, and then it quickly moved to nerve sensations creeping up towards my brain. The headache was so intense I just had to sit in my chair, close my eyes, and just take in the experience and wonder if this was it. After about 10 minutes, it all went away. No headache, no nerve sensation, just a lingering feeling like I just had a line of cocaine.

Delta was similar in that it had a very strong odor, like something you'd smell at a bakery but I couldn't place exactly what. Again, a stimulant effect but not as intense. It went the furthest with classic symptom expression, but only so far as a day of small patches of dry, infected throat tissue occasionally popping up and going away.

BA1 was quite different. It was already widespread in America by the time it was announced, I remember smelling it in the lobby of Wal-Mart around Thanksgiving. Instant headache and burning eyes. A little bit of psychosis, a scab in my nose, but nothing more. But for the next two months I could feel clots breaking loose in my veins and lost feeling in my second toe. Ohh yea, the outermost layer of skin on my hands started peeling off too. BA2 and it's various sub-lineages were when the headaches began, BA4 in particular. I couldn't think for a few days. BA5 gave me painless blisters on my arms for a month and a half.

Never had a "sore" throat, no coughs, no fever, just all the other strange manifestations. Most people would not have put two and two together because they've never been told these things were possible, let alone considered these as signs of having "had covid." To wit, my gf got quite angry when I pointed out that the scratchy throat she had never experienced before, the incessant coughing fits, and voice so hoarse she could barely speak were all characteristic of covid infection. Ohh your throat isn't sore like a cold? That's the analgesic effect of the spike protein. She's just in complete denial so I don't even talk about it anymore. Didn't even consider once that getting infected would be a possible consequence of choir practice, and I'm not even going to remind her that she's probably feeling like shiat right now because of practice a few days ago. People just can't handle this shiat for some reason, let alone the classic symptoms. It's always gotta be a cold, or the summer flu, or sudden-onset allergies, or just... nothing. I'm feeling just fine and this is completely normal, stop asking.

Then you tack on the post-viral downstream heart problems like TFA mentions, that's where the real fun begins. I know what it's like to exert a little too much and suddenly find yourself in a tachycardia feedback loop. Oxygen throughput isn't high enough, your heart pumps faster, throughput gets reduced even more, heart pumps even faster. Suddenly you hit a brick wall with a pulse rate of over 200 and every time it beats you hear gurgling sounds.

And that's to say nothing for the concomitant brain damage you might find yourself dealing with. Things like not being able to think or concentrate, stuttering and aphasia, or even remember basic things about yourself. Like, what did I do yesterday? Usually I don't know, most of my memories are always just slightly out of reach, it's all a barely-recognizable smear. And being tired all the time, nobody mentioned how great it is great living like a cat and sleeping for 16 hours a day. Depression and anxiety? Yea it's probably not a neurotransmitter imbalance because the slew of drugs do nothing. Turns out heightened anxiety is a neat little evolutionary defense mechanism, probably won't get eaten by leopards if you are always looking for leopards. If you had to live like this you might be a little depressed.

This whole ordeal has been a life-changing problem for 15, 20 years for me, and this new coronavirus can cause all of these same things and even more, as it has done so for a metric shiatload of people already. It is not a joke, it is not a cold, it is not a flu, and it is most assuredly not mild. It is some real-deal bad shiat that can completely fark your life up permanently. You do not want it, ever, under any circumstance, or at any dosage.
 
2022-10-07 12:58:13 AM  
Ohh yea, I just remembered that the day my throat was scratchy from delta, my entire face was numb like I had just had dental work. Straight up anesthesia. Yea that's totally normal, colds do that all the time...

Telling my gf this made her even more angry. She obviously couldn't refute it, and might have even felt it herself, but using that as evidence was just too much to handle because it wasn't something that the news was talking about. "It's not covid!" she quietly yelled as loudly as she could.

And another thing I just remembered, I kept smelling a strange chemical smell from her in the days prior to this. It took a while to figure it out, but it smelled like an old topical antibiotic ointment that is no longer made. Very similar to Neosporin, except with more chemicals and less vaseline. She had no idea what I was talking about and hadn't used any of it. I was already aware of coronavirus being sensed as odors like this, but was certain when I began smelling it in my nose away from her and then my face went numb the next day.
 
2022-10-07 1:09:59 AM  
In the years before the pandemic, I saw several things.  My mother, who was handicapped had already survived a stroke in 1998, had a second stroke in 2014 and somehow survived 2 months of being trapped in a coma.  Her youngest sister had a stroke a year or so later.  Then both my mother and father had PEs.  Then a young coworker friend of mine died on a ventilator after being treated for leukemia.  And then my mom's other younger sister had a stroke.

Having strokes and PEs runs in my family, at least definitely on the female side.  And, like I said, I've sat for several painful weeks with a friend who didn't make it off a ventilator and his family.  I am kinda horrified by this, and I have been extremely fortunate to still find myself working from home.  Double my chances of a stroke or PE?  Fark that.  People who've never had to be a caretaker or need a caretaker are way too nonchalant about this.  I can't even begin to tell you how much dread and anger I have over it.

But I am happy to hear survivor stories and I hope every last one of you farkers stay safe as best you can and take these things very farking seriously.
 
2022-10-07 1:59:03 AM  
I know someone who is in the hospital right now with Covid - she has what appears to be delirium. Agitated and delusional, ripping her IV out.  It's really bad. She's only in her 50's. It happened so fast, too. This is scary stuff.
 
2022-10-07 2:59:38 AM  
Don't consume added sugar and processed fiberless refined carbs.
 
2022-10-07 3:04:11 AM  
Maybe letting a monstrosity that does cumulative damage to almost every organ in the body every time it infects you spread like pollen was a bad idea.

Who could've possibly guessed?

And people ask why I wear an N95 everywhere.
 
2022-10-07 3:07:18 AM  
I had a little cold this week. Last night I was in the midst of some chills and fever and had a weird tingle emanating from the base of my skull down through body, arms, and legs and I thought, "Maybe that's my 5G activating, Haha" then I thought, "Huh, might as well take one of those free tests I have sitting around." Turns out it was my 5G activating. Or maybe it was, I'll take another test in the morning to see what's what.
 
2022-10-07 3:24:35 AM  
And in order that I'm doing something about the problem and not just sneering at the plague rats (no matter how deservingly):

https://bonafidemasks.com/harley-n95-l-188-respirator-face-mask/
These have kept me safe throughout the entire omicron wave. They fit tight. They're comfortable enough for me to wear for hours at the gym. They have a large surface area and are highly breathable (low dynamic pressure drop). NIOSH found that they average 98.5% filtration for the most penetrating particles. They're good (if we're being real) for about 24-48hr worth of cumulative use. And they're under $1 each.

Remember: the nose must be pinched and fit tight, or you may as well not be wearing it. If you feel any air jets, it's not quite sealing.

Remember: avoid touching the outside when donning or removing it.

1cm of beard compromises filtration down to about 85%.
 
2022-10-07 4:06:55 AM  

erik-k: And in order that I'm doing something about the problem and not just sneering at the plague rats (no matter how deservingly):

https://bonafidemasks.com/harley-n95-l-188-respirator-face-mask/
These have kept me safe throughout the entire omicron wave. They fit tight. They're comfortable enough for me to wear for hours at the gym. They have a large surface area and are highly breathable (low dynamic pressure drop). NIOSH found that they average 98.5% filtration for the most penetrating particles. They're good (if we're being real) for about 24-48hr worth of cumulative use. And they're under $1 each.

Remember: the nose must be pinched and fit tight, or you may as well not be wearing it. If you feel any air jets, it's not quite sealing.

Remember: avoid touching the outside when donning or removing it.

1cm of beard compromises filtration down to about 85%.


I've got two brands of N95s that I've been using, but I will give these a try too because I have to fly cross country to care for my mom.  Thank you for the link!
 
2022-10-07 4:53:07 AM  

erik-k: 1cm of beard compromises filtration down to about 85%.


I have lines cut into my beard so I get a decent fit.  Put the mask up against your  face, trace around it with a beard trimmer, then remove and widen the line.  You also need to keep the hair on your chin from getting too thick so the mask doesn't get pushed out.

Beards also cause problems if you're going to talk in the mask-- it pulls it down a little each time you open your mask, so if you need to talk in it, you can end up with your nose rubbed raw.

...

And for those people going through long Covid, and even those that aren't so they have controls, an NIH study of it: https://recovercovid.org

/finally got accepted just as I got past the worst of the brain fog and chronic fatigue
//they originally only took people up to 24 months after getting sick
///spent 30 months feeling like shiat
 
2022-10-07 7:11:40 AM  
I've dodged COVID completely so far. But I've also been hyper paranoid about limiting my exposure, and never relented on wearing a mask.

This shiat is exactly why.

My biggest risk factor is my parents still insist on going out to eat when we visit. I wear a mask walking in and out of the restaurant, but there's nothing for it when eating.
 
2022-10-07 7:38:28 AM  

Znuh: Hi. I'm the Farker that wrote about surviving COVID in March of 2020. Turns out surviving the initial infection is the START of things, not the end.

If you feel sunburn in your legs / calves, or chest pain, immediately get checked out.

I was lucky to survive the initial infection, then MIS-A when I was discharged from Hospital. The Docs didn't tell me at the time I went home, that they thought my chances of making it were shaky at best. I was told point blank that I almost died twice six months after initial infection. My resting pulserate for those six months was 136-138.

Had I not been put on bloodthinners in ICU, I probably wouldn't be typing this.

Then I had tachycardia / arrhythmia. Tests showed nothing. Shortness of breath, insane levels of muscle weakness, tiredness. Phantom pains.

Then in October of 2021, I felt incredible sunburn in my left calf. As my former employer had nixed our health insurance, I couldn't go into Hospital or Urgent Care. I started taking aspirin daily in the hopes it would help be 'enough' of a bloodthinner.

Then, two weeks after the DVT in my calf, it vanished. Week three I came home from selling possessions to pay for rent and Ollie's teeth, because again, said former Boss was late with my Paycheck.

It started as a backache. Near my right shoulderblade. I was driving Hobbes the Fleetwood home from selling things and I couldn't believe the size of the knot in my back, how it hurt.

I came home, got onto the bed to take my shoes off after greeting Mrs. Z and it was like someone shot me.

I keeled over, I couldn't breathe. The pain was acute, intense and glittering, as if I'd been skewered on a bayonet. I forced in a breath. Then another. Then another.

Having had lung issues from COVID, I was well familiar with the benefits of using a Spirometer. I stood up, Kris looking alarmed, and forced in pain to take ten measured breaths with the Spirometer.

My entire back hurt. I couldn't lie down as it felt like connective tissue inside my ribcage was pulling itself apart. This lasted two weeks.

I slept in the front room, away from Kris, bolt upright on the leather couch that I'd previously nursed myself back to health on when I was released from ICU.

The pain was incredible, I was forced to use Belladonna-laced pain relieving patches all up and down my right side on my back (these are not exotic, they're a British pain-relieving staple).

For a week I coughed up clots. One as big as a dime. Apparently the DVT had turned into a full blown PE that then passed through the vasculature of my right lung.

Thanks to the Healthcare Marketplace, I was able to purchase my own health insurance. I went to see my regular doctor. She stood there, and I could see her turning pale the more I shared. I showed her the pictures of the clots I had coughed up on my phone.

"Znuh." She replied, calmly. "You know how you used up two of your nine lives with COVID?" I nodded. "You just had, and survived a Pulmonary Embolism. You should be dead. Again. We're going to start calling you Doctor Katz."

And then she instantly had me whisked off for an ultrasound, followed with a CATScan, which showed that yes, I'd survived a PE.

That ended with three more CATscans over a six month period. I was immediately put on Lovenox for a week. Now, Lovenox only works if it's injected into your stomach. I was given 28 syringes and told to inject this into my stomach, two syringes, twice daily.

You haven't lived until you've been given a VERY LARGE syringe and told that you, yourself have to inject this into your stomach. Then do it again. Then later that day do it once more. And Lovenox BURNS as it sinks into you.

Then it was six months of Warfarin, getting a 'groovy' chunky chrome medalert bracelet, and going in twice a week to dial in the dose.

Learning that leafy greens were out. That nuts were out. That all sorts of food that you thought were fine contribute to your clotting factor. When you're on bloodthinners, everything has to be watched. 

COVID infected my entire body. It went after my heart, lungs, kidneys and liver, and caused bright flashing in my eyes, as well as arresting my sense of smell and taste.

Surviving the initial infection was just the beginning.

It is still here, it doesn't fsck around. it's bloody nasty. Horrifying.

We're still in a pandemic. It's not over. Don't eat the FUD that's out there that suggests we're in the clear.

Take steps. Protect yourself.


I assume your doctors talked with you about the newer anticoagulants like Apixaban, Rivaroxaban etc and there are reasons why they or you decided on Warfarin?
Because from the time when I was taking it before switching to one of the newer anticoagulants, the food restrictions are related to the way how Vitamin K counteracts the way that Marcumar (warfarin) affects clotting.
The newer anticoagulants inhibit other parts of the clotting process that aren't affected by what you eat.
 
2022-10-07 7:43:43 AM  
(just in case you still have to take them)
 
2022-10-07 11:13:31 AM  

mistahtom: Don't consume added sugar and processed fiberless refined carbs.


Though a bit of a throwaway comment, there's actually a lot of truth to that concerning COVID.

From the very beginning, it became clear that being overweight/obese was the leading comorbidity (after old age) for becoming seriously ill after contracting COVID.  It's no mystery, having been reported for decades now, that a diet high in refined carbs, including sugar, is at the root of the high obesity rates all around the world.  We went into the pandemic already incredibly unhealthy, and COVID has managed to exploit that in a huge way.

I think about the stories 2+ years ago reporting that COVID was triggering diabetes, and the shock expressed by Farkers at the time.  I was one of the few who wasn't shocked.  1/3 of American adults are considered to be pre-diabetic, and when the stories started coming it, it seemed pretty obvious that COVID was just the trigger for something that probably would have eventually happened anyway.  And yes, I'm sure diabetes was triggered in otherwise healthy people, just like plenty of non-obese people became horribly ill after getting COVID.  But we have decades worth of data that shows our diets  are destroying our health.
 
2022-10-07 10:28:32 PM  
Masks, it's better than the alternative
 
2022-10-07 10:37:23 PM  

The Voice of Doom: I assume your doctors talked with you about the newer anticoagulants like Apixaban, Rivaroxaban etc and there are reasons why they or you decided on Warfarin?
Because from the time when I was taking it before switching to one of the newer anticoagulants, the food restrictions are related to the way how Vitamin K counteracts the way that Marcumar (warfarin) affects clotting.
The newer anticoagulants inhibit other parts of the clotting process that aren't affected by what you eat.


It came down to cost, and the availability of an antidote. Further, Warfarin is a very, very well known drug. Having been around since the 60s, it's known through and through. 

Not so much the new stuff. So, if I was going to have to deal with a catastrophic hemorrhage, I wanted to be on a drug that was thoroughly understood. 

This advice came from my Mum, who was a former RN. The second factor was cost. Eliquis' cost to me, with insurance was over $2100. Warfarin, a three month supply, was $40. 

I was beyond fine with modding my diet to fit Warfarin's needs, as I preferred a simple antidote of Vitamin K if, god forbid, I needed it, and I liked the fact that it was well established, with its side effects well documented. 

Which was to me, an OK tradeoff versus paying over two grand, and being able to just...eat whatever. 

The most terrifying was coming off of thinners, and then wondering if any twinge I felt in my legs or chest was another clot.
 
2022-10-07 11:43:05 PM  

Colonel_Angus: I think about the stories 2+ years ago reporting that COVID was triggering diabetes, and the shock expressed by Farkers at the time. I was one of the few who wasn't shocked.


Once it was discovered that COVID causes microclots that do permanent organ damage... well, pretty much anything that is caused by a low-functioning organ can be triggered by COVID if you were marginal to start with, or after enough bouts with COVID.

The reason I remain concerned with COVID is I really don't want to slowly develop long COVID over the remaining few decades of my life.  Even vaccines are probably only slowing down the damage.  But I guess that's going to become 'just part of life' now.
 
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