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(NJ.com)   People insist on driving through saltwater," Farrell said. "The modern automobile and saltwater do not go well together"   (nj.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, Long Beach Island, New Jersey, Ocean County, New Jersey, Tide, Wind, Storm surge, Coastal geography, Tropical cyclone  
•       •       •

3113 clicks; posted to Main » on 05 Oct 2022 at 11:36 AM (16 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



43 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-10-05 10:42:22 AM  
What era did? Oh, right: none of them.
 
2022-10-05 10:53:12 AM  
Good thing they fixed that issue for the Cybertruck.
 
2022-10-05 11:28:21 AM  

I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: What era did? Oh, right: none of them.


Lots of things don't mix well with salt water, like forever, yeah.
 
2022-10-05 11:37:56 AM  
Ah, but what about taffy? Huh? Yeah. You forgot about that one.
 
2022-10-05 11:38:39 AM  
"Things that don't mix with saltwater" Analyst. Now there's an easy position  - you just pick something new that's not oil-based for every report....
 
2022-10-05 11:40:15 AM  
Geowulf - Saltwater (Official Video)
Youtube fXO-HnjLLiY
 
2022-10-05 11:41:24 AM  
also when your streets flood, it means the combined sewage system most places have, is now in that water.
 
2022-10-05 11:42:42 AM  
external-content.duckduckgo.comView Full Size
 
2022-10-05 11:43:44 AM  
....Saw an article this morning warning people not to try and recharge lithium batteries that were submerged in saltwater.

Oh, I know someone is going to try it anyways; but it'll be fun to watch.
 
2022-10-05 11:47:20 AM  

LineNoise: also when your streets flood, it means the combined sewage system most places have, is now in that water.


Fortunately there are very few NJ communities that still have such a system, and none on any of the barrier islands. But the runoff still contains plenty of animal feces, dead things, and other stuff that can give you a nasty infection if you wade in it with an open cut.
 
2022-10-05 11:51:29 AM  
A let better than it was in the 70s when 20% of the cars on the road were full of rusty holes.

Today, at least for premium cars, all the body panel seams are welded and the entire car is dipped into a big vat for a rust proofing electrically bonded coat followed by two or more dips in paint and a final clear coat. I can't remember the last time I saw rust on a car.
 
2022-10-05 11:54:12 AM  
Antique car owners, check me on this: I'm going to guess that cars around 70 years and a little older could endure saltwater splash-up better than modern ones, in that their only "electronics" are a battery and a starter.
 
2022-10-05 11:57:46 AM  

Martian_Astronomer: Good thing they fixed that issue for the Cybertruck.


Fark user imageView Full Size


/Most cars are temporary boats. Very temporary.
 
2022-10-05 11:59:03 AM  
Of course, the right wing media are pushing the idea that electric autos would all fail during a hurricane and seawater will kill them all. Gas autos will be fine.
 
2022-10-05 12:01:38 PM  

lurkey: Long Beach Island Sandbar always get eroded by storms.
It's amazing that it's still there.


Yeah, I'm sure one day it won't be, but probably at least 100 years.  Maybe a little faster if the human race continues to stick their heads in the sand to in order to ignore climate change.

As to the headline/quote, that guy ain't lyin'.  The salt water dissolves iron brake rotors like you wouldn't even know.  You couldn't pay me to drive my car through a street flooded with salt water.
 
2022-10-05 12:06:58 PM  

hissatsu: Martian_Astronomer: Good thing they fixed that issue for the Cybertruck.

[Fark user image 850x477]

/Most cars are temporary boats. Very temporary.


In the event of a water landing, Elon Musk can be used as a floatation device (temporarily)...
 
2022-10-05 12:10:08 PM  

abbarach: hissatsu: Martian_Astronomer: Good thing they fixed that issue for the Cybertruck.

[Fark user image 850x477]

/Most cars are temporary boats. Very temporary.

In the event of a water landing, Elon Musk can be used as a floatation device (temporarily)...


He's so full of hot air, he not only floats but can temporarily hover.
 
2022-10-05 12:23:22 PM  

Sleeper_agent: A let better than it was in the 70s when 20% of the cars on the road were full of rusty holes.


But enough about old people
 
2022-10-05 12:26:18 PM  

Sleeper_agent: A let better than it was in the 70s when 20% of the cars on the road were full of rusty holes.

Today, at least for premium cars, all the body panel seams are welded and the entire car is dipped into a big vat for a rust proofing electrically bonded coat followed by two or more dips in paint and a final clear coat. I can't remember the last time I saw rust on a car.


Part that and part people don't keep cars that long anymore.  My parents never owned a car that was less than 10 years old and dad kept them running until the body fell apart which was usually mostly body putty at that point.
My 1st car was older than I was.
The minivan I use when hauling stuff to my businesses or for yard work is 14 years old, has 210k miles, drives amazing (honda) and has a little rust in front of the rear wheel wells.  Bought it 10 years ago used for 15k, 10k cash after a crappy trade in.  14 years 0 car payments and only a couple of cv joints, battery, timing chain, brakes and motor mounts....and had to have the hood repaired because the paint started to come off.  So yes cars still rust if you can find someone driving a car older than 10 or 15 years old like you did in the 80s.
I suspect with cars going up and the chip shortage you will see rust again more often.
 
2022-10-05 12:26:37 PM  
Those old-timey horseless carriages could handle salt water much better.
 
2022-10-05 12:28:55 PM  
People are idiots.  And people in NJ think they are invincible.  Not a good combination.
 
2022-10-05 12:36:20 PM  
Dennis and the Amphibious Exploring Vehicle (Untethered Rage)
Youtube dNc7FEJmBZ0
 
2022-10-05 12:37:26 PM  

lurkey: Long Beach Island Sandbar always get eroded by storms.
It's amazing that it's still there.


The sandbar is maintained by the State of NJ and Army Corps or Engineers.   The rich people who own houses there (which are covered by federally subsidized flood insurance) will have your ass arrested if you step foot anywhere near 'their' beach.  "GO HOME, BENNY!"
 
2022-10-05 12:37:43 PM  

Huck And Molly Ziegler: Antique car owners, check me on this: I'm going to guess that cars around 70 years and a little older could endure saltwater splash-up better than modern ones, in that their only "electronics" are a battery and a starter.


Eh, maybe. as soon as you get saltwater around the distributor you're dead. The WWII Jeeps that "floated" in? They had a whole sealed system and a way to pressurize the engine because there's no way to really seal an engine.
Then the whole thing had to be depressurized as soon as you landed because a pressurized crankcase makes extra work for the engine and they needed every bit of power they could muster to live. That's one of many reasons why nearly every modern engine has a PCV system, to put the engine under negative pressure and make it easier for the engine to work and make more power. The shade tree mechanic that says, "I'm gonna rip all that dang emissions crap off my engine," is an idiot.
 
2022-10-05 1:04:00 PM  

thealgorerhythm: [external-content.duckduckgo.com image 474x274]


( ._.)

decades later and i still want one
 
2022-10-05 1:12:38 PM  
this sounds like something my brother would try.  He's the sort who thinks that just because he has a stock 4Runner that he can go through anything.

Moron has spent more money repairing that thing from his misadventures, and I've wasted more time winching his dumba$$ out of stuff (and only because our parents are living and beg me to do so) than I care to think about.

Water and automobiles don't mix, especially once the water reaches a certain level (and it's usually not as high as you think).  Even with aftermarket accessories to address those conditions, you're going to want to choose your battles very carefully.

Saltwater and automobiles ABSOLUTELY do not mix.  And once you start dealing with traversing saltwater that's higher than a few inches, you're better off just heading inland or seeking higher ground.
 
2022-10-05 1:13:40 PM  

ctighe2353: Sleeper_agent: A let better than it was in the 70s when 20% of the cars on the road were full of rusty holes.

Today, at least for premium cars, all the body panel seams are welded and the entire car is dipped into a big vat for a rust proofing electrically bonded coat followed by two or more dips in paint and a final clear coat. I can't remember the last time I saw rust on a car.

Part that and part people don't keep cars that long anymore.  My parents never owned a car that was less than 10 years old and dad kept them running until the body fell apart which was usually mostly body putty at that point.
My 1st car was older than I was.
The minivan I use when hauling stuff to my businesses or for yard work is 14 years old, has 210k miles, drives amazing (honda) and has a little rust in front of the rear wheel wells.  Bought it 10 years ago used for 15k, 10k cash after a crappy trade in.  14 years 0 car payments and only a couple of cv joints, battery, timing chain, brakes and motor mounts....and had to have the hood repaired because the paint started to come off.  So yes cars still rust if you can find someone driving a car older than 10 or 15 years old like you did in the 80s.
I suspect with cars going up and the chip shortage you will see rust again more often.


My work van is an '02 Odyssey.

Body is beat to crap but it's got over 470k, only engine work has been routine stuff: timing belts, oil leaks, maintenance stuff, etc.

Now, the transmission....the Honda 5 speed is probably the worst transmission Honda ever made, it's on it's third replacement unit.
 
2022-10-05 1:32:46 PM  

Sleeper_agent: A let better than it was in the 70s when 20% of the cars on the road were full of rusty holes.

Today, at least for premium cars, all the body panel seams are welded and the entire car is dipped into a big vat for a rust proofing electrically bonded coat followed by two or more dips in paint and a final clear coat. I can't remember the last time I saw rust on a car.


Pretty sure they are talking about operating gear.   A carb is less likely to die from a water splash than a high pressure fuel injection system and electronics suite.  My father used to have a new luxo car from work every year.  I remember that the 70s models were already rusting when they got replaced.
 
2022-10-05 1:38:41 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size


/notice lack of ocean
 
2022-10-05 1:40:05 PM  

ctighe2353: Sleeper_agent: A let better than it was in the 70s when 20% of the cars on the road were full of rusty holes.

Today, at least for premium cars, all the body panel seams are welded and the entire car is dipped into a big vat for a rust proofing electrically bonded coat followed by two or more dips in paint and a final clear coat. I can't remember the last time I saw rust on a car.

Part that and part people don't keep cars that long anymore.  My parents never owned a car that was less than 10 years old and dad kept them running until the body fell apart which was usually mostly body putty at that point.
My 1st car was older than I was.
The minivan I use when hauling stuff to my businesses or for yard work is 14 years old, has 210k miles, drives amazing (honda) and has a little rust in front of the rear wheel wells.  Bought it 10 years ago used for 15k, 10k cash after a crappy trade in.  14 years 0 car payments and only a couple of cv joints, battery, timing chain, brakes and motor mounts....and had to have the hood repaired because the paint started to come off.  So yes cars still rust if you can find someone driving a car older than 10 or 15 years old like you did in the 80s.
I suspect with cars going up and the chip shortage you will see rust again more often.


Wrong. The US auto fleet age has been steadily increasing for decades. 50 years ago, the average car was about 7 years old, now it's over 12 years old.

50 years ago, getting 100k miles out of the average car was an achievement. Now, it's the bare minimum of how long a car should last. Between my kids, their spouses, my wife and me, almost all the vehicles are past the 150k mark.
 
2022-10-05 1:42:14 PM  

Fissile: lurkey: Long Beach Island Sandbar always get eroded by storms.
It's amazing that it's still there.

The sandbar is maintained by the State of NJ and Army Corps or Engineers.   The rich people who own houses there (which are covered by federally subsidized flood insurance) will have your ass arrested if you step foot anywhere near 'their' beach.  "GO HOME, BENNY!"


i see you've visited Harvey Cedars
 
2022-10-05 1:44:59 PM  

The Irresponsible Captain: That's one of many reasons why nearly every modern engine has a PCV system,


i thought the positive crankcase system was to recover combustion blow by gases and misted oil as an emissions control... the roads no longer have the black stain down the middle as a result.
 
2022-10-05 1:50:53 PM  

asciibaron: The Irresponsible Captain: That's one of many reasons why nearly every modern engine has a PCV system,

i thought the positive crankcase system was to recover combustion blow by gases and misted oil as an emissions control... the roads no longer have the black stain down the middle as a result.


That is another reason, but some manufacturers went to PCV early because of other benefits. It also reduces sludge formation and increases oil life.
 
2022-10-05 1:54:46 PM  

asciibaron: The Irresponsible Captain: That's one of many reasons why nearly every modern engine has a PCV system,

i thought the positive crankcase system was to recover combustion blow by gases and misted oil as an emissions control... the roads no longer have the black stain down the middle as a result.


The other reason is that modern cars don't leak nearly as much as those old cars.  Up until the 1960s it was common for cars to use leather seals and cork gaskets.  They leaked continuously.  Every time you stopped for gas you needed to top up the oil.
 
2022-10-05 1:56:29 PM  

asciibaron: The Irresponsible Captain: That's one of many reasons why nearly every modern engine has a PCV system,

i thought the positive crankcase system was to recover combustion blow by gases and misted oil as an emissions control... the roads no longer have the black stain down the middle as a result.


What, you got something against road draft tubes?

They used to make it really fun when it first starts raining and the layer of oil would start washing off....
 
2022-10-05 2:01:25 PM  

cretinbob: I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: What era did? Oh, right: none of them.

Lots of things don't mix well with salt water, like forever, yeah.


Even ships don't mix well with salt water.
 
2022-10-05 2:04:45 PM  

ctighe2353: Sleeper_agent: A let better than it was in the 70s when 20% of the cars on the road were full of rusty holes.

Today, at least for premium cars, all the body panel seams are welded and the entire car is dipped into a big vat for a rust proofing electrically bonded coat followed by two or more dips in paint and a final clear coat. I can't remember the last time I saw rust on a car.

Part that and part people don't keep cars that long anymore.  My parents never owned a car that was less than 10 years old and dad kept them running until the body fell apart which was usually mostly body putty at that point.
My 1st car was older than I was.
The minivan I use when hauling stuff to my businesses or for yard work is 14 years old, has 210k miles, drives amazing (honda) and has a little rust in front of the rear wheel wells.  Bought it 10 years ago used for 15k, 10k cash after a crappy trade in.  14 years 0 car payments and only a couple of cv joints, battery, timing chain, brakes and motor mounts....and had to have the hood repaired because the paint started to come off.  So yes cars still rust if you can find someone driving a car older than 10 or 15 years old like you did in the 80s.
I suspect with cars going up and the chip shortage you will see rust again more often.


Nope.  I was around in the 70's, and cars simply did not last as long then.  Seeing a car from the 1950's still being used as a daily driver was practically unheard of.  They simply did not last that long without being treated as a vintage collectable.

Nowadays I see 20 and 30 year old cars in everyday service all the time.  People routinely expect to get 200,000 miles from a Toyota.  My father's rule of thumb in the 60's and 70's was that when a car had 50,000 miles on it, it was worn out.

BTW, I thought todays cars were often made of galvanized steel, which resists corrosion better than plain steel?
 
2022-10-05 2:18:31 PM  

Sleeper_agent: I can't remember the last time I saw rust on a car.


I take it you've never been to the northeast.
 
2022-10-05 2:31:59 PM  

Fissile: asciibaron: The Irresponsible Captain: That's one of many reasons why nearly every modern engine has a PCV system,

i thought the positive crankcase system was to recover combustion blow by gases and misted oil as an emissions control... the roads no longer have the black stain down the middle as a result.

The other reason is that modern cars don't leak nearly as much as those old cars.  Up until the 1960s it was common for cars to use leather seals and cork gaskets.  They leaked continuously.  Every time you stopped for gas you needed to top up the oil.


as a vintage VW owner, the various attempts to add a vapor recovery system to the crankcase venting is interesting.  they used air pumps to create an "afterburner" in some models and a pseudo crankcase valve using abreather tower and diaphragm in other models.  the type 1 air cooled flat four had an air intake for the crank behind the pulley.  the crank had a spiral groove that forced air into the crankcase and overpressurized it, forcing the combustion gases out thru the carb to be burnt.

i just read up on the sealed crankcases of WW2 tanks and Willys jeeps.  they were pressurized to keep water out when fording rivers.  they were the first to have snorkel air intakes as well.

a system used to keep water out was later transformed into a system to reduce emissions.

i learned something new today and it filled in a knowledge gap about my own VW engines and their design.  Fark can be cool sometimes :)

thanks Irresponsible Captain and Fissle.
 
2022-10-05 2:32:33 PM  

Monac: BTW, I thought todays cars were often made of galvanized steel, which resists corrosion better than plain steel?


The car bodies today are dipped in anti-corrosion chemicals. then they are dipped in anti-corrosion primers, and then they are painted with catalyzed  paint.  That doesn't mean they are rust proof, but they hold up a hell of a lot better than the cars from the 50s and 60s did.   If you drive a car in area where road salt is not used, the car bodcy can easily go a couple of decades before it starts rusting.
 
2022-10-05 3:27:01 PM  
Why does it crack me up everytime someone speaks of "the modern automobile"?

Ah, yes I see there, fella! You're talking about the horseless carriage of the twenty first century, marvel of mechanized coachbuilding!
 
2022-10-05 4:50:42 PM  

bisi: Why does it crack me up everytime someone speaks of "the modern automobile"?

Ah, yes I see there, fella! You're talking about the horseless carriage of the twenty first century, marvel of mechanized coachbuilding!


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2022-10-05 4:53:01 PM  
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