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(Hack A Day)   Reverse engineering an obsolete interface card to get an ancient CD drive working, ISA what you did there   (hackaday.com) divider line
    More: Amusing, 7400 series, Computer data storage, Read-only memory, CD-ROM, SCSI, CD-R, CD drive, simple process  
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1193 clicks; posted to STEM » on 05 Oct 2022 at 12:30 AM (8 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



22 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-10-04 8:13:56 PM  
That brings back horrible memories of fighting with himem.exe and Novell driver settings, IRQ conflicts, and sudden PC lockups just to get a EVGA card, a 3COM Ethernet card, a Sound Blaster, and IDE controller to all play along well enough to watch crude pr0n animations for 5 seconds after spending an hour downloading them at 1200 baud.

The things I used to fap to....
 
2022-10-04 8:32:13 PM  
A CM100 with it's proprietary ISA card. That brings up some memories.

/not good ones
 
2022-10-04 8:34:33 PM  

Wanebo: A CM100 with it's proprietary ISA card. That brings up some memories.

/not good ones


But I do have to give them cred that after you fought through all the interrupt and driver and conflict issues it actually did kind of work. Mostly. Sometimes.
 
2022-10-04 8:43:39 PM  

markie_farkie: That brings back horrible memories of fighting with himem.exe and Novell driver settings, IRQ conflicts, and sudden PC lockups just to get a EVGA card, a 3COM Ethernet card, a Sound Blaster, and IDE controller to all play along well enough to watch crude pr0n animations for 5 seconds after spending an hour downloading them at 1200 baud.

The things I used to fap to....


I....I... just had a flashback.
 
2022-10-04 9:12:20 PM  

Rev.K: markie_farkie: That brings back horrible memories of fighting with himem.exe and Novell driver settings, IRQ conflicts, and sudden PC lockups just to get a EVGA card, a 3COM Ethernet card, a Sound Blaster, and IDE controller to all play along well enough to watch crude pr0n animations for 5 seconds after spending an hour downloading them at 1200 baud.

The things I used to fap to....

I....I... just had a flashback.


imgs.xkcd.comView Full Size
 
2022-10-04 10:34:02 PM  
Seeing all those caterpillars brings back memories.
 
2022-10-04 11:53:41 PM  
In the mid 80s I was still on my Apple //e.

I do remember around 1995 or so the little software company I worked for got an early CD burner.

It was a big tabletop appliance that cost $1,000 and connected to a SCSI card with the big honking parallel SCSI connector that had the fasteners.

IIRC it required a VESA VLB bus to maintain the data rate required to burn a disc.

The CD-Rs were $20 each.
 
2022-10-05 1:10:25 AM  

make me some tea: In the mid 80s I was still on my Apple //e.

I do remember around 1995 or so the little software company I worked for got an early CD burner.

It was a big tabletop appliance that cost $1,000 and connected to a SCSI card with the big honking parallel SCSI connector that had the fasteners.

IIRC it required a VESA VLB bus to maintain the data rate required to burn a disc.

The CD-Rs were $20 each.



I remember those vividly. All the discs were gold, at least the ones that worked with mine.  I think it was a Phillips burner. I had to put rubber isolation matting underneath it to keep from getting coasters.

It did allow me to make quite a bundle on software compilations with keygens and cracks already included.

Warez in the 90s were a different time. Good times.
 
2022-10-05 1:12:30 AM  

Caelistis: make me some tea: In the mid 80s I was still on my Apple //e.

I do remember around 1995 or so the little software company I worked for got an early CD burner.

It was a big tabletop appliance that cost $1,000 and connected to a SCSI card with the big honking parallel SCSI connector that had the fasteners.

IIRC it required a VESA VLB bus to maintain the data rate required to burn a disc.

The CD-Rs were $20 each.


I remember those vividly. All the discs were gold, at least the ones that worked with mine.  I think it was a Phillips burner. I had to put rubber isolation matting underneath it to keep from getting coasters.

It did allow me to make quite a bundle on software compilations with keygens and cracks already included.

Warez in the 90s were a different time. Good times.


Yep, gold CDRs. Crazy to think about now.

They had a high failure rate too. The burning software was CLI only, I had to learn how to make it work.
 
2022-10-05 1:13:03 AM  
Ok... is there such a thing as an adapter to allow old-skool [E]ISA [8|16] to connect into a PCI[e|x|whatever] slot, or to a USB port?  If you want to use one of these old devices in a current computer you'd need some similar adapter.

I have an old 7 or 8 disk 4x cd-rom changer that claimed it was SCSI but I could never get it to work with other SCSI controllers than the one it came with, an 8bit ISA card. I had got a nice PCI SCSI controller with an expansion board that allowed 64mb of ram sticks to be added as cache, and no matter of cabling, termination, whatever could get it to work.
It was great for Baulder's Gate though. No disk swapping for the 5 disks, it knew they were in the next bay.
 
2022-10-05 1:58:03 AM  

Wanebo: That brings up some memories.


What some memory from back in the day might look like:
encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.comView Full Size
 
2022-10-05 3:02:28 AM  

Caelistis: make me some tea: In the mid 80s I was still on my Apple //e.

I do remember around 1995 or so the little software company I worked for got an early CD burner.

It was a big tabletop appliance that cost $1,000 and connected to a SCSI card with the big honking parallel SCSI connector that had the fasteners.

IIRC it required a VESA VLB bus to maintain the data rate required to burn a disc.

The CD-Rs were $20 each.


I remember those vividly. All the discs were gold, at least the ones that worked with mine.  I think it was a Phillips burner. I had to put rubber isolation matting underneath it to keep from getting coasters.

It did allow me to make quite a bundle on software compilations with keygens and cracks already included.

Warez in the 90s were a different time. Good times.


I miss warez.  You don't really need them anymore, but it just felt better using them.
 
2022-10-05 8:21:58 AM  
That brings up one question...why?  It's not like CD drives are no longer available.
 
2022-10-05 8:28:59 AM  

EasilyDistracted: That brings up one question...why?  It's not like CD drives are no longer available.


Why is Doom still ported to random devices when I can download a copy on my smartphone?

Some people just do it for fun.
 
2022-10-05 9:23:22 AM  

EasilyDistracted: That brings up one question...why?  It's not like CD drives are no longer available.


Did you know that flint knapping is a popular hobby?
 
2022-10-05 9:59:57 AM  

make me some tea: I do remember around 1995 or so the little software company I worked for got an early CD burner.


The best thing between floppy/CDs and USB thumb drives was Iomega Zip drives. I loved those things when they first came out. And then all the ones I worked with started dying with the "click of death."

If they had actually had some production standards, though, they were pretty cool at the time.
 
2022-10-05 1:22:58 PM  

transporter_ii: make me some tea: I do remember around 1995 or so the little software company I worked for got an early CD burner.

The best thing between floppy/CDs and USB thumb drives was Iomega Zip drives. I loved those things when they first came out. And then all the ones I worked with started dying with the "click of death."

If they had actually had some production standards, though, they were pretty cool at the time.


Yeah, it's easy to forget about that weird period between Zip drives and USB drives where simple portable storage didn't really exist. Especially since bad CDRW burns were so common (and pricey).
 
2022-10-05 3:48:37 PM  
I saw the YouTube video a few days ago.  Gotta admire the effort, even if it's to interfere a very old and slow CD-ROM drive.  Best part was that he had a working board with the first revision.  That's awesome.

It's a good thing it was all discrete logic with no programmable logic to find code for.  That would've shut this project down pretty quick.
 
2022-10-05 4:54:32 PM  

FaygoMaster: I saw the YouTube video a few days ago.  Gotta admire the effort, even if it's to interfere a very old and slow CD-ROM drive.  Best part was that he had a working board with the first revision.  That's awesome.

It's a good thing it was all discrete logic with no programmable logic to find code for.  That would've shut this project down pretty quick.


Yep. So many copper traces went underneath chips that easily could have been jumbled up while overlaying the photos to his actual PCB layout. A logic input tied high when it should have been low because he was low on caffeine, swapped address or data lines because the original designer did something goofy that got fixed in the driver and this guy had to go on the assumption that no such goofiness occurred. But at the end of it all, not a single cut trace or jumper wire. Pretty farking awesome.
 
2022-10-05 6:26:05 PM  

markie_farkie: That brings back horrible memories of fighting with himem.exe and Novell driver settings, IRQ conflicts, and sudden PC lockups just to get a EVGA card, a 3COM Ethernet card, a Sound Blaster, and IDE controller to all play along well enough to watch crude pr0n animations for 5 seconds after spending an hour downloading them at 1200 baud.

The things I used to fap to....


himem.sys, no?
 
2022-10-05 6:58:20 PM  

ClintonTyree: markie_farkie: That brings back horrible memories of fighting with himem.exe and Novell driver settings, IRQ conflicts, and sudden PC lockups just to get a EVGA card, a 3COM Ethernet card, a Sound Blaster, and IDE controller to all play along well enough to watch crude pr0n animations for 5 seconds after spending an hour downloading them at 1200 baud.

The things I used to fap to....

himem.sys, no?


Correct.. There was himem.sys and emm386.exe that worked in tandem to access RAM above 64k.

Because remember, 64K was all the RAM you'd ever need, ever.
 
2022-10-05 10:50:55 PM  
The days before plug and play peripherals are best forgotten or snuffed out in therapy, if necessary.
 
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