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(Some Guy)   According to Chef José Andrés unless you use his way of cracking an egg, you're inviting salmonella to enter   (mashed.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, The New Yorker, Egg, Chef Jos Andrs, The Egg, Egg yolk, man-made sort, Instagram page, World Central Kitchen  
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1037 clicks; posted to Food » on 04 Oct 2022 at 5:50 PM (9 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



42 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-10-04 5:35:37 PM  
I like Chef Andrés. This is dumb.
 
151 [OhFark]
2022-10-04 5:53:40 PM  

fatassbastard: I like Chef Andrés. This is dumb.


It's actually not. I've been doing it that way for years. Also minimizes the possibility of getting shell into the apparatus you're putting the eggs into
 
2022-10-04 5:55:33 PM  

fatassbastard: I like Chef Andrés. This is dumb.


He's not wrong. That's been the recommended method for a while now.

But chances are you'll still be fine cracking it the stereotypical way.
 
2022-10-04 6:16:05 PM  

151: fatassbastard: I like Chef Andrés. This is dumb.

It's actually not. I've been doing it that way for years. Also minimizes the possibility of getting shell into the apparatus you're putting the eggs into


Yeah, my understanding is that this is the way to reduce shards of eggshell breaking free.

If you want to reduce salmonella, wash your eggs, because you're basically touching the outside of the eggs, then spreading salmonella everywhere if it's on the eggs.
 
2022-10-04 6:24:57 PM  
Wait... I'm doing it right cracking on a countertop or cutting board? After I was taught to use an edge growing up? Damn if only I didn't figure that out on my own...
 
2022-10-04 6:29:41 PM  
He's wrong!  ...[reads article...he does it the way I do it...]  He's RIGHT!
 
2022-10-04 6:29:47 PM  

Axeofjudgement: Wait... I'm doing it right cracking on a countertop or cutting board? After I was taught to use an edge growing up? Damn if only I didn't figure that out on my own...


Would now be a bad time to mention that if you had salmonella on your eggs, you just smeared it all over your cutting board?
 
2022-10-04 6:34:34 PM  

Oneiros: Axeofjudgement: Wait... I'm doing it right cracking on a countertop or cutting board? After I was taught to use an edge growing up? Damn if only I didn't figure that out on my own...

Would now be a bad time to mention that if you had salmonella on your eggs, you just smeared it all over your cutting board?


I usually precut all my veggies and nightshades.

Then again I only had salmonella once from the well water... that was fun
 
2022-10-04 7:04:21 PM  
probably depends more on where you get your eggs

eggs sold in the store in US have been washed, at a farmers market or from the chicken farmer probably not

eggs sold in many other countries haven't

/and you could just wash your eggs if this concerns you
 
2022-10-04 7:05:03 PM  
That dude looks like a bearded egg.
 
2022-10-04 7:21:24 PM  

fatassbastard: I like Chef Andrés. This is dumb.


No, this is the way. Try it. Less tiny pieces, and also the rounded cracked portion it creates actually allows you to get a better grip on the shell halves with your fingers than the smaller edge crack.
 
2022-10-04 7:28:01 PM  
Or you could actually cook the eggs and not worry about salmonella.
 
2022-10-04 7:41:48 PM  

Axeofjudgement: Oneiros: Axeofjudgement: Wait... I'm doing it right cracking on a countertop or cutting board? After I was taught to use an edge growing up? Damn if only I didn't figure that out on my own...

Would now be a bad time to mention that if you had salmonella on your eggs, you just smeared it all over your cutting board?

I usually precut all my veggies and nightshades.

Then again I only had salmonella once from the well water... that was fun


Yeah, I do the same.  Cut up all of the vegetables first, but them aside, then deal with any animal products.

It's the switching back and forth that gets you into trouble for cross-contamination.

When I crack eggs on my cutting board, I end up with the occasional smear of egg white on the board.  So I often just crack them against the bottom of the pan or griddle if it's got empty space.  Or I'll use the flat area of the stove, as I'm not going to be putting other food there.
 
2022-10-04 7:48:21 PM  

revrendjim: Or you could actually cook the eggs and not worry about salmonella.


Yeah, but then I'd miss out on eggs over easy which is part of my deathrow meal.
 
2022-10-04 7:54:23 PM  
I originally got that advice from Alton Brown.  Just crack your egg on a flat surface, better results every time.
 
2022-10-04 7:57:13 PM  

151: fatassbastard: I like Chef Andrés. This is dumb.

It's actually not. I've been doing it that way for years. Also minimizes the possibility of getting shell into the apparatus you're putting the eggs into


I've been doing it that way for decades
 
2022-10-04 8:13:04 PM  

revrendjim: Or you could actually cook the eggs and not worry about salmonella.


i typically eat my eggs over easy, so not really cooked

i don't think I ever got sick from it (but maybe I blamed the sausage if I did?)

/been doing it this way for more than two score
/ain't gonna stop now
 
2022-10-04 8:28:00 PM  
So you aren't supposed to just squeeze the egg unti it shoots it's innards mostly into your vessel anymore??
 
2022-10-04 8:30:47 PM  

petec: probably depends more on where you get your eggs

eggs sold in the store in US have been washed, at a farmers market or from the chicken farmer probably not

eggs sold in many other countries haven't

/and you could just wash your eggs if this concerns you


There's something about eggs in the US being processed to the point that they have to be refrigerated, isn't there? Some membrane gets washed off, and they only keep fresh in the fridge or something. In the UK, shops sell eggs at ambient temperature, and I keep them ambient in my kitchen. I've seen chefs' recommendations that you should bring your eggs up to room temperature when baking or whatever anyway, so it seems counterproductive to put them in the fridge, if chefs think they cook better from room temperature.

But I'm not much of an egg man anyway. And were I worried about salmonella on the shell, I'd wipe the shell with anti-bac/anti-viral sanitiser before cracking. It seems totally counterintuitive to me that you'd get a better crack of an eggshell from a flat surface than something that has an edge.

But, like I said, not an egg man.
 
2022-10-04 8:36:29 PM  
I've always cracked my eggs on a flat surface.

When I've cracked them on the edge of a bowl, there's tiny eggshell fragments and one of two of them always seem to end up in the eggs and they're hard to get out, let alone spot.

On the other hand, when I've cracked them on a flat surface, the eggshell fragments are larger and they rarely end up in my eggs or in the pan. And if one piece does, it's far easier to find and remove.
 
2022-10-04 8:36:36 PM  

sotua: fatassbastard: I like Chef Andrés. This is dumb.

No, this is the way. Try it.


I have, doesn't work well for me. I've been cracking them on the edge of the bowl since I was a kid and it works just fine. Don't feel the need to relearn how to crack an egg.

And if salmonella was really much of a problem we'd be hearing about people getting it all the time. I've never heard of someone getting it. Kind of like raw cookie dough.

Anyhoo, was really just being snarky, I know chefs recommend that way.
 
2022-10-04 8:41:17 PM  
TIL: Salmonella is like a vampire.
 
2022-10-04 8:45:06 PM  
That's the way they taught at cooking school in the 90's
/Jose Andres is a farking hero
 
zez
2022-10-04 8:51:36 PM  

iron de havilland: petec: probably depends more on where you get your eggs

eggs sold in the store in US have been washed, at a farmers market or from the chicken farmer probably not

eggs sold in many other countries haven't

/and you could just wash your eggs if this concerns you

There's something about eggs in the US being processed to the point that they have to be refrigerated, isn't there? Some membrane gets washed off, and they only keep fresh in the fridge or something. In the UK, shops sell eggs at ambient temperature, and I keep them ambient in my kitchen. I've seen chefs' recommendations that you should bring your eggs up to room temperature when baking or whatever anyway, so it seems counterproductive to put them in the fridge, if chefs think they cook better from room temperature.

But I'm not much of an egg man anyway. And were I worried about salmonella on the shell, I'd wipe the shell with anti-bac/anti-viral sanitiser before cracking. It seems totally counterintuitive to me that you'd get a better crack of an eggshell from a flat surface than something that has an edge.

But, like I said, not an egg man.


Found Jamie Hyneman's fark handle
 
zez
2022-10-04 8:53:27 PM  
I always crack my eggs on the edge of something. I've tried it the flat surface way but it usually just leaves a dent or the egg leaks out everywhere.

/no salmonella yet
 
2022-10-04 8:56:27 PM  
well, this is a good idea if you had eggs that were not cleaned like most American egg producers do.
 
2022-10-04 8:57:58 PM  

zez: iron de havilland: petec: probably depends more on where you get your eggs

eggs sold in the store in US have been washed, at a farmers market or from the chicken farmer probably not

eggs sold in many other countries haven't

/and you could just wash your eggs if this concerns you

There's something about eggs in the US being processed to the point that they have to be refrigerated, isn't there? Some membrane gets washed off, and they only keep fresh in the fridge or something. In the UK, shops sell eggs at ambient temperature, and I keep them ambient in my kitchen. I've seen chefs' recommendations that you should bring your eggs up to room temperature when baking or whatever anyway, so it seems counterproductive to put them in the fridge, if chefs think they cook better from room temperature.

But I'm not much of an egg man anyway. And were I worried about salmonella on the shell, I'd wipe the shell with anti-bac/anti-viral sanitiser before cracking. It seems totally counterintuitive to me that you'd get a better crack of an eggshell from a flat surface than something that has an edge.

But, like I said, not an egg man.

Found Jamie Hyneman's fark handle


Ben Bailey-Smith, ackchyually :-P

64.media.tumblr.comView Full Size
 
2022-10-04 9:09:50 PM  

Axeofjudgement: Wait... I'm doing it right cracking on a countertop or cutting board? After I was taught to use an edge growing up? Damn if only I didn't figure that out on my own...


heh, i also figured it out on my own. always crack on a flat surface = no shell shards in the egg, easy-over here we come!
 
2022-10-04 9:13:57 PM  
i subbed a thread for chef andres world central kitchen and puerto rico, NOW it's my turn!

https://wck.org/relief/hurricane-ian

give jose some bucks, see real results. they are still on the ground in puerto rico, in and around ukraine, pakistan, everywhere they are needed. i love chef andres!
 
2022-10-04 9:45:09 PM  
I read - decades ago - that the whole flat surface vs edge discussion happened because the eggs produced in Europe/US slowly drifted apart: in general, European eggs tend to have a thicker shell, so they mostly kept to the old edge method.  US eggs generally have thinner shells and a flat surface is more forgiving.

I tear a half sheet paper towel and lay it on the stove surface next to my pan. Tap, egg goes in, the shell(s) go on the paper towel, wrap/quick wipe and in the trash/bin.
 
2022-10-04 9:50:41 PM  

olorin604: So you aren't supposed to just squeeze the egg unti it shoots it's innards mostly into your vessel anymore??


nah, you crack it on your head...

pbs.twimg.comView Full Size
 
2022-10-04 9:59:03 PM  

petec: olorin604: So you aren't supposed to just squeeze the egg unti it shoots it's innards mostly into your vessel anymore??

nah, you crack it on your head...

[pbs.twimg.com image 635x459]


hey, the temple IS a relatively flat surface! crack an egg on your head....(sings you a song)
 
2022-10-04 10:48:03 PM  

DecemberNitro: That dude looks like a bearded egg.


Maybe. But Jose, Jacques, and St. Alton (peace be upon him) are about the only people I'd follow the instructions of. fark that sentence came out weird.
 
2022-10-04 11:28:33 PM  
I always crack my eggs this way:
Hibachi Chef Spins Egg on Spatula - 1018319
Youtube oMu_aWDi7Fs
...cause, you know.  I just can.

/can't
//can't even flip an omelette correctly
///three eggs for the Lumberjack Breakfast plate.
 
2022-10-04 11:32:00 PM  
Jacques Pépin and Alton Brown drilled this into our heads long before José Andrés, but they're all correct. Flat surface. No edges, no devices, just a quick rap on the counter to crack the egg, then pull the shell apart so the outside doesn't end up on the inside.
 
2022-10-05 12:27:08 AM  
Is it too late to mention that we get most of our salmonella in thie US from leafy greens?
 
2022-10-05 12:39:00 AM  

rosekolodny: Is it too late to mention that we get most of our salmonella in thie US from leafy greens?


Yes, way too late, don't even bother.
 
2022-10-05 1:17:09 AM  

rosekolodny: Is it too late to mention that we get most of our salmonella in thie US from leafy greens?


I'm eating raw, unwashed, leafy greens topped with raw eggs (cracked on an edge, so plenty of shell fragments in there) right now, so I'm getting a kick...
 
2022-10-05 2:34:34 AM  
I always thought cracking eggs on an edge was the epitome of things people who never take two seconds to think about what they're doing do.  It's like the most obvious thing in the world that cracking that way can lead to little shells in the egg.  Sheesh, at least use the edge of the counter or something.
 
2022-10-05 2:35:59 AM  

olorin604: So you aren't supposed to just squeeze the egg unti it shoots it's innards mostly into your vessel anymore??


That's harder than it sounds.
 
2022-10-05 9:16:58 AM  

rosekolodny: Is it too late to mention that we get most of our salmonella in thie US from leafy greens?


rosekolodny: Is it too late to mention that we get most of our salmonella in thie US from leafy greens?


Bears repeating. It's not a reason to shove salmonella into your eggs, but, for fark's sake, wash your damned produce. Between salmonella, listeria, and E. coli, it's like we're trying to kill ourselves by being lazy bastards...
 
2022-10-05 10:52:23 PM  
I fail to see how the surface you crack your eggs on controls whether or not the hens that laid them were carrying a salmonella infection.
Per the CDC, Salmonella can get on the shells of eggs when birds lay eggs or when the eggs touch bird droppings (poop) after being laid. This is not a problem for commercial eggs (for example, eggs you buy at the grocery store) because companies wash eggs before they reach stores.
Salmonella also can contaminate the egg's contents while it is forming inside the chicken before shells are formed. Today, a lot fewer egg-laying hens have this problem than during the 1980s and 1990s, so eggs are safer. But some eggs are still contaminated with Salmonella.
 
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