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(Some Gal)   It was mighty rainy and chilly today, got me thinking about winter. Do you all overwinter your plants? Are there brassicas in your future? This is your Fark Gardening thread for Tuesday October 4   (brassicas.com) divider line
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530 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Oct 2022 at 7:00 AM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-10-04 1:20:35 AM  
Those that I can.  We intended on building a greenhouse this year, but life (and pricing) got in the way.  I've yet to do a dedicated pull out; I wait for the first frost, usually around Halloween in my neighborhood.  I've dropped things into window wells before and covered, with mixed success.  I've a smattering of nasturtiums, which I hear will overwinter quite well, but I'm also running out of space.

My front bulbs are in; I've another hundred to go in back, but it's difficult for me to dig, and I need help to get them in.

I've 8 dogwoods put in, too, and a row of irises (blue ruffled and purple king) that I exchanged with a lady from reddit with a ton of cookies.

I miss my columbines. They're a thing for me.

I threw my lupine seeds in; we'll see.  I miss my Manhattan Lights.

I have two orange climbing roses on order to go over my arbor in front.
 
2022-10-04 1:34:59 AM  
If it survives, it survives.  If it dies, it dies.  If City Hall gave a damn, they'd let me hire a groundskeeper.  They don't teach gardening in museum school.
 
2022-10-04 1:52:44 AM  
The 22' garden was a fail due to a soggy cold spring and a complete lack of time. So the 23' plan involves me putting in raised beds with better drainage and some really good row covers to help with pests. The goal for next year is producing enough greens to cover 2 quality salads a week from May through October.

The raised beds are purchased and assembled and I'm letting the birds strip the places they'll be going down to bare soil. They'll be fenced off this once the beds are put in place and leveled.
 
2022-10-04 4:09:16 AM  
My mom wants to get my dad a greenhouse for his bonsais once they get the money for their house.  Because right now, what my dad does with his tropical bonsais is he overwinters them in his best friend Tokso's greenhouse.

So I can look forward to one more thing in my backyard.  :)
 
2022-10-04 7:05:24 AM  
400 watt & 1000 watt bulbs.  It's always summer (or fall)
 
2022-10-04 7:08:31 AM  
Nowadays I don't have enough space to overwinter stuff so I usually only keep things that are hardy perennials, can survive/regrow outdoors due to SNOWVID conditions (e.g., bulbs), or are small enough to stay indoors on a windowsill (e.g., some smaller CAMs, orchids).

I would happily dedicate a room and stack it with high-quality grow lights, however.  Long ago my "hemp" thanked me and it was a wonderful place for me to go to enjoy a green scene in the middle of winter.  I'd even prefer that 24/7 because done right you have zero pests.
 
2022-10-04 7:10:00 AM  
A bad season all around. I didn't get my peach tree sprayed for brown rot and all the fruit were ruined. NowI have a ton of passion fruit but becaused it is so late in the season it isn't getting ripe.  I don't try to overwinter anything and just hope for a better year next year.
 
2022-10-04 7:13:18 AM  
I no longer garden thanks to overpopulation of deer. Apparently all the deer allow me to grow are Joro spiders.
 
2022-10-04 7:19:32 AM  
I've got a habanada pepper plant that I'm overwintering. We'll see how it goes.
 
2022-10-04 7:29:21 AM  
Cleaning up the peppers and onions.  I dice and freeze them for my omelets through the year:

Fark user imageView Full Size


Also, I'm in the middle of pumpkin contest season.  Doing well so far:

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2022-10-04 7:32:56 AM  
We overwinter potted plants and shallow rooted plants in the garage. The same day we were worrying about Ian, our new grow light showed up. Last winter, I forgot to shut the garage door one day and 40 or 50 plants bought it. Note to self: In December, put a big reminder sign on the door to the garage  SHUT THE DOOR.

At its coldest, the garage rarely dips into the high 30s. 2 or 3 incandescent bulbs at once should make enough heat to keep all but the most sensitive plants alive.
 
2022-10-04 7:47:11 AM  
I'll probably overwinter the bell pepper plants again.  Last winter was the first I tried and it went well with easier growth in the Spring.   I decided not to overwinter the eggplant again, it looked pretty pitiful.  We had a tough end of Summer with a extended dry period.

I bought a garden cover crop seed mix and this weekend added it to the ground level plot after spreading the compost that was ready.  I'll see if that helps for next year.  I have a smaller raised bed for Fall/Winter stuff.
 
2022-10-04 7:53:17 AM  

MIRV888: 400 watt & 1000 watt bulbs.  It's always summer (or fall)


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2022-10-04 7:55:20 AM  

CatRevenge: I'll probably overwinter the bell pepper plants again.


Interesting - I have always treated my vegetables as annuals, tearing them out at the end of the season, maybe saving some seeds if I'm feeling like I can pull off some starters in the spring. I hadn't considered bringing them inside and getting more than one season out of the same plant. Are you actively growing peppers indoors in the winter months? Or are you just keeping them in a dormant state?
 
2022-10-04 8:00:37 AM  
The closest thing to overwintering I typically do is covering up strawberries with some hay in the raised bed. The rest of the bed gets a nice helping of fresh compost that should break down nicely with the freeze/thaw cycles over the winter and early spring. The annuals in the borders all get cut back and that's that for the year.

My biggest concern right now is repairing huge swathes of grass that got hit with grubs and skunks this year. Not sure what happened as we didn't have a bad beetle year but the grubs were out in force. I've got close to 100 sq ft that I've reseeded but looking like it may get too cold too quickly to get it in a place where it can survive winter. With the mud patches it's going to be like Verdun 1916 in my back yard come February.
 
2022-10-04 8:01:46 AM  

Shaggy_C: CatRevenge: I'll probably overwinter the bell pepper plants again.

Interesting - I have always treated my vegetables as annuals, tearing them out at the end of the season, maybe saving some seeds if I'm feeling like I can pull off some starters in the spring. I hadn't considered bringing them inside and getting more than one season out of the same plant. Are you actively growing peppers indoors in the winter months? Or are you just keeping them in a dormant state?


It was kinda in-between really.  I do have lights available, but I followed some YouTube videos in that I cut the plants back pretty far, trimmed off some leaves and such.  The YTs pretty much had it down to a naked branch if I recall, but I didn't go that far.  Then they said placement in a sunny window would be sufficient for over-wintering.  Do a YT search, there are plenty of videos out there.  And of course once you watch one, about 50 will pop up to continue watching, lol.
 
2022-10-04 8:03:18 AM  
I also suggest hitting them with neem oil or something to control what pests you bring inside.
 
2022-10-04 8:15:07 AM  
Yesterday I put my Christmas cactus into its box for dormancy.
 
2022-10-04 8:19:34 AM  
  Covered my peppers with a sheet thrown over the gallery railings.  Frost last night but it's supposed to be going up to 17c today and 22 by midweek. I've got 7 pepper plants that are just now starting to show their first peppers and I think I just picked the final pepper on the plant I had from last year. I've got to find peppers that will grow in the snow.
 
2022-10-04 8:21:42 AM  
I've got to let this Ian weather pass over before I dump the garage and setup for winter. Some of this year's peppers are on their third year and I'd like to see how far I can take them. The Hungarian peppers are banging away out in the greenhouse and still green. I've got eight enormous Brussel sprout trees.

This was a pretty good year with way fewer pests and I modified my approach to include automatic watering and letting some of the weeds and wasps have some room. The cukes got hit with a brown rust which was new but the copper sulfate I mixed into the soil and the heavy hit with bone meal really seems to have knocked the fusarium out and helped fix the blossom end rot in the tomatoes. I only had a touch of it a few months ago.

I plan on overwintering anyone who seems like they'll fit in the garage, which has LED grow lights and a timer. I definitely need a plant day this weekend and Sunday looks to be sunny!
 
2022-10-04 8:26:18 AM  
I have some leeks I'll be harvesting through the winter. I also have some cauliflower and brussels sprouts I planted in the middle of the summer. They'll be ready in a few weeks. Not much else going on.
 
2022-10-04 8:40:27 AM  

CatRevenge: Shaggy_C: CatRevenge: I'll probably overwinter the bell pepper plants again.

Interesting - I have always treated my vegetables as annuals, tearing them out at the end of the season, maybe saving some seeds if I'm feeling like I can pull off some starters in the spring. I hadn't considered bringing them inside and getting more than one season out of the same plant. Are you actively growing peppers indoors in the winter months? Or are you just keeping them in a dormant state?

It was kinda in-between really.  I do have lights available, but I followed some YouTube videos in that I cut the plants back pretty far, trimmed off some leaves and such.  The YTs pretty much had it down to a naked branch if I recall, but I didn't go that far.  Then they said placement in a sunny window would be sufficient for over-wintering.  Do a YT search, there are plenty of videos out there.  And of course once you watch one, about 50 will pop up to continue watching, lol.


I've watched the videos and tried that with hot peppers a number of times. During transplantation, if you don't wash off the plant and thoroughly clean off the old dirt when you trim the roots back, you get aphids real bad in the middle of winter. You also have to transplant into "new" potting soil because your old soil has aphid eggs in it. I gave up overwintering them because after all the work maintaining them for several months, even when I did everything right, they never outperformed the vigorous young plants I started from seed. I live in the snow belt though. If I lived further south and the plants didn't have to spend nearly 7 months in the house they'd probably do better.
 
2022-10-04 9:03:03 AM  
We're just getting the last of the fall plantings in - bulbs are next, once it stops raining.
Spent Sunday digging a new planting bed to extend our front garden. Waiting for the hibiscus to arrive that will be the centerpiece.
 
2022-10-04 9:18:28 AM  
I have a bunch of time that I keep meaning to plant in the front perennial herb garden. And then it got all rainy and cold and I don't wanna.
 
2022-10-04 9:27:03 AM  
So cal only has two seasons. Strawberry and no strawberries.
 
2022-10-04 9:27:54 AM  

pheelix: CatRevenge: Shaggy_C: CatRevenge: I'll probably overwinter the bell pepper plants again.


It was kinda in-between really.  I do have lights available, but I followed some YouTube videos in that I cut the plants back pretty far, trimmed off some leaves and such.  The YTs pretty much had it down to a naked branch if I recall, but I didn't go that far.  Then they said placement in a sunny window would be sufficient for over-wintering.  Do a YT search, there are plenty of videos out there.  And of course once you watch one, about 50 will pop up to continue watching, lol.

I've watched the videos and tried that with hot peppers a number of times. During transplantation, if you don't wash off the plant and thoroughly clean off the old dirt when you trim the roots back, you get aphids real bad in the middle of winter. You also have to transplant into "new" potting soil because your old soil has aphid eggs in it. I gave up overwintering them because after all the work maintaining them for several months, even when I did everything right, they never outperformed the vigorous young plants I started from seed. I live in the snow belt though. If I lived further south and the plants didn't have to spend nearly 7 months in the house they'd probably do better.



I think being further south has made starting from young plants harder.  By the time the plants get a nice size, the summer heat halts progress, then have to wait a month or so for more fruiting.  With the over-wintered, I got early fruit, then the slow period, now they are happy again.   At least that's the perceived difference.  There are so many variables to gardening. Sheesh
 
2022-10-04 9:30:51 AM  
The jade and spider plants come inside, the Meyers Lemon gets covered. That's about it. If there's a hard freeze, the nasturtiums will die back to the ground, but we don't get those every year.  The greenhouse is mostly for getting an early start in the Spring.
 
2022-10-04 9:33:14 AM  
not exactly what was asked for, but I finally harvested my teensy tomatillos (after an entire summer I had a little over a pound) and made a tomatillo salsa yesterday and had enchiladas suiza.


Next step, figure out what to do with the overgrowth of tomato vines (I think it's... just rip 'em out when they start to die back).
 
2022-10-04 10:05:54 AM  
I asked this last week and got no answers so I will try one more time: what do I need to know about growing garlic? Anything different if I am doing it in a raised bed? I was able to get enough info to know that I should get hardneck since I am in zone 5a. You all have inspired me to try it.

The plan is to plant them in the planter on wheels I have on my patio. They will have a space of 2'x2' and take up half of the planter. The other half will be my usual spring greens like lettuce and spinach. The planter will not get any sun in winter but gets plenty when I move it to its usual space in spring.
 
2022-10-04 10:20:10 AM  
I broke down the garden this past weekend. A little earlier than normal but I am getting a knee replaced in a couple of weeks so I needed to get this done. A little more today and the back will be all ready except mulching and tarping the containers. No changes to the 5' x 20' bed I have against the building but some to the wall. I added a 20" x 67" raised bed and filled it with the soil from my grow bags. Next year I will be planting pole beans so they can climb a trellis against the wall and don't know yet what I will plant in front of them. Maybe broccoli?

The raised bed on the left is my strawberries. They had been in grow bags but didn't do as well as I hoped. This is the bed that used to be on my patio but was a PIA to move. I got a new one for the patio with wheels. I still have space for 3-4 grow bags between the planters. I usually do 2 eggplant and am thinking of something else I can add.

What you don't see is 2- 24" square raised beds, each with a columnar apple tree and 1 more half barrel on the wall. The barrels have raspberries and blueberries.

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2022-10-04 10:33:28 AM  

yakmans_dad: We overwinter potted plants and shallow rooted plants in the garage. The same day we were worrying about Ian, our new grow light showed up. Last winter, I forgot to shut the garage door one day and 40 or 50 plants bought it. Note to self: In December, put a big reminder sign on the door to the garage  SHUT THE DOOR.

At its coldest, the garage rarely dips into the high 30s. 2 or 3 incandescent bulbs at once should make enough heat to keep all but the most sensitive plants alive.


I overwinter a couple of potted plants in the garage. The tropicals (brugmansia and alstroemeria) go to the basement and are allowed to go dormant. I start bringing them back around March1 by heavy watering and putting them in a grow tent. They don't need temps higher than mid 60's so I don't heat the tent other than the little extra from the grow light.

The brugmasia this year:

Jean Pasko, 3rd summer:
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Pink Lady,1st full summer:

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The stuff in the tent this past spring:

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2022-10-04 10:39:21 AM  

JeffKochosky: We're just getting the last of the fall plantings in - bulbs are next, once it stops raining.
Spent Sunday digging a new planting bed to extend our front garden. Waiting for the hibiscus to arrive that will be the centerpiece.


I planted a hibiscus last fall. Mulched it well and then waited in the spring. I waited, and waited, and thought it died do I bought another. The day before the new one arrived, the old one finally emerged. They are one of the last to emerge in spring (early June for me) so be patient. This year I planted a few spring bulbs around it so next spring I will get some snowdrops and anemones to provide a bit of color until the hibiscus starts coming up.

What variety did you get? Mine is Luna Red and I love it!
 
2022-10-04 10:48:50 AM  

catmandu: what do I need to know about growing garlic? Anything different if I am doing it in a raised bed?


I grew garlic once in a raised bed, but one still attached to the earth.  I think your 2x2 planter should be fine, but again, I don't have that experience.   I can say don't eat the garlic scapes raw (blech), and though I planted different varietals (spanish roja, russian red, music) I couldn't taste any difference so didn't bother with them again.
 
2022-10-04 11:06:16 AM  

catmandu: I asked this last week and got no answers so I will try one more time: what do I need to know about growing garlic? Anything different if I am doing it in a raised bed? I was able to get enough info to know that I should get hardneck since I am in zone 5a. You all have inspired me to try it.

The plan is to plant them in the planter on wheels I have on my patio. They will have a space of 2'x2' and take up half of the planter. The other half will be my usual spring greens like lettuce and spinach. The planter will not get any sun in winter but gets plenty when I move it to its usual space in spring.


I tried both garlic and shallots in a raised bed last year.  I didn't do anything differently than when I put them in the ground.  They turned out fine(ish).   The 'ish' is because I didn't get them planted soon enough for my zone, 7b.  Just give them plenty of room and good soil, they will be fine.
 
2022-10-04 11:39:57 AM  

CatRevenge: catmandu: I asked this last week and got no answers so I will try one more time: what do I need to know about growing garlic? Anything different if I am doing it in a raised bed? I was able to get enough info to know that I should get hardneck since I am in zone 5a. You all have inspired me to try it.

The plan is to plant them in the planter on wheels I have on my patio. They will have a space of 2'x2' and take up half of the planter. The other half will be my usual spring greens like lettuce and spinach. The planter will not get any sun in winter but gets plenty when I move it to its usual space in spring.

I tried both garlic and shallots in a raised bed last year.  I didn't do anything differently than when I put them in the ground.  They turned out fine(ish).   The 'ish' is because I didn't get them planted soon enough for my zone, 7b.  Just give them plenty of room and good soil, they will be fine.


How far apart should I plant the bulbs? I plan to mulch with straw, then tie a heavy duty tarp over the planter, both to keep it a bit warmer and to prevent critters from digging. Usually I just tie a length of landscape fabric over it to keep the critters out so I have fewer weeds in the spring. The red squirrels like to plant birdseed.
 
2022-10-04 11:55:17 AM  
Spent 3.5 hours arranging half-assed frost blanket tents and such.  Temp ended up being 6 F colder than expected, which was exciting.  Almost everything has pulled through so far, but it's going down below freezing at the end of the week.

July was so dry here that most things ended up a month behind schedule.  Our bell pepper plants are just reaching their full strength, which is awkward.  Scant harvest, there, this year.  We have a fair bit of frost-hardy stuff slowly coming along, still, and we'll see, but we clearly need a greenhouse.

The real kicker was we have a lot of bushy thimbleberry plants now, but this summer was so much hotter than average that none of them produced fruit.  Midwestern climate is now seeming kind of consistently too hot for some stuff we want to grow and too variable for other stuff that used to be easy.

As I said, apparently we need a greenhouse.  Year before last we had a cheap-ass plastic greenhouse in our driveway and grew kale and spinach and baby lettuce in it all winter, despite it being half buried in snow.  It doesn't necessarily take a lot, if you have the room for it.
 
2022-10-04 12:11:37 PM  
Going to try to bring the rosemary, oregano, thyme, maybe the bazzle if the frost didn't kill it. Any tips, anyone? Zone 5b (Ottawa Canada).
 
2022-10-04 12:13:51 PM  
No point in overwintering anything here, cause when winter clamps down and the high is 20f and the low gets down to 5f, a greenhouse makes no difference, everything freezes. Only the spearmint and raspberries and apples  return with no help.
 
2022-10-04 12:17:00 PM  

catmandu: How far apart should I plant the bulbs? I plan to mulch with straw, then tie a heavy duty tarp over the planter, both to keep it a bit warmer and to prevent critters from digging. Usually I just tie a length of landscape fabric over it to keep the critters out so I have fewer weeds in the spring. The red squirrels like to plant birdseed.


Just looked at my garden book, he recommends 6" apart, 2" deep.  You can probably inter-plant the other things you are planning on for that bed.  They won't spread that far apart growth-wise, but probably more for nutrients, they are pretty heavy feeders.
 
2022-10-04 12:44:56 PM  

Honest Geologist: Going to try to bring the rosemary, oregano, thyme, maybe the bazzle if the frost didn't kill it. Any tips, anyone? Zone 5b (Ottawa Canada).


I'm somewhere between 6a and 5b, and my oregano and thyme come back every year.  The rosemary, not so much.  It lives in a pot and has to come indoors for the winters - although I have seen really hardy rosemary here, mine can never hack it outdoors.

Basil is an annual.  Just freeze as much as you can.
 
2022-10-04 3:26:29 PM  
What's this winter thing everyone is talking about? I think a girl wintered on me once in college. Does that count?

Why would I do anything different to the plants?

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