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(Deslidefied)   The most useless degrees today. Creative writing. Fashion design. Computer Science. Wait, what?   (deslide.clusterfake.net) divider line
    More: Unlikely, number of slides, Lens, 1990s American television series, site, image URLs, slides  
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1098 clicks; posted to Business » on 03 Oct 2022 at 2:44 PM (8 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-10-03 2:12:57 PM  
Computer science
There's been an emphasis in recent years on computer science careers, but that focus has led to an oversaturation of computer science graduates compared to the number of jobs available.
If you still want to get a computer science degree, find ways to make yourself stand out among other applicants such as internships and training or certification in specialized skills.


This is exactly the same as it was in 1994, 2002, 2009 and 2016. People laughed at me for starting a CS degree in 2003 but I've had no problem finding work at any time in my career.
 
2022-10-03 2:51:34 PM  
Obviously written by a jealous Creative Writing major.
 
2022-10-03 2:52:54 PM  
Useless degrees? That was a useless slideshow. They pretty much just listed ANY degree, and then Doom Shouted their way through the explanation.

Then again, it's modern "journalism", so of course they would think things like "writing" were overrated skills.

What a shiatty list. Subby should die the death of a thousand paper cuts, but this WAS Deslidified, so I guess that lets subby off the hook this time.
 
2022-10-03 2:59:32 PM  

Tr0mBoNe: Computer science
There's been an emphasis in recent years on computer science careers, but that focus has led to an oversaturation of computer science graduates compared to the number of jobs available.
If you still want to get a computer science degree, find ways to make yourself stand out among other applicants such as internships and training or certification in specialized skills.

This is exactly the same as it was in 1994, 2002, 2009 and 2016. People laughed at me for starting a CS degree in 2003 but I've had no problem finding work at any time in my career.


I have a Computer Engineering degree but I went into Software Development.  I get at least a dozen calls a week from different recruiters.
 
2022-10-03 3:04:25 PM  
I would say just about any PhD in the sciences is probably a bigger career non-starter. There haven't been enough tenure positions or post-docs for a long time. Academia is completely farked and a tenure position might as well be a fantasy at this point. Post-docs are pretty slim, even if you wanted to put up with the slave conditions.
A CS degree will get you a job even if you are halfway competent. I can see a lot of idiots not getting jobs but a competent programmer will make money.
 
2022-10-03 3:09:59 PM  
That copy sucks.

Anyway --

🎼* Listicle writer, Listicle writer.
Dear Sir or Madam, will you read my list?
It verbose 'n took an hour to write, will you take a look?
It's based on a list by a gal named Greer,
And I need a job,
So I want to be a listicle writer,
Listicle writer.
Listicle writerrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr.

*G Myxolodian
 
2022-10-03 3:12:17 PM  
We're looking down the barrel of an automation revolution that will make the industrial revolution look quaint. Horses need not apply.
 
2022-10-03 3:19:18 PM  

djfitz: I can see a lot of idiots not getting jobs but a competent programmer will make money.


The trouble with this field is that no one wants you if you don't have experience (like, even more so than other fields).

Most job postings try to filter out anyone with less than 5 or 10 years working experience. You can't intern for five years. Tech job postings are notorious for being impossible (my favorite was the guy who invented a product being rejected for not having enough experience with the product). There have been a couple of times that I've a company and, hilariously, I was unqualified (according to the job posting) for positions I effectively created.

At a minimum you need to be lucky and/or an accomplished liar to get into this career. I think most people are too honest for that.
 
2022-10-03 3:35:39 PM  
You know what would have been more useful?

A Most Useful Degrees article.
 
2022-10-03 3:41:33 PM  
Apparently tourism is so useless they couldn't even find a picture to illustrate it.
 
2022-10-03 3:42:12 PM  
What American kids need to understand in the modern, global economy, they are competing against people in other countries where education is fully subsidised by the state. In other words, the "bare minimum" is no longer going to be a bachelor's degree, but multiple bachelor's or even a master's for many jobs where there is global talent available. As such, I highly recommend diversifying - double or triple major in undergrad so you have a plethora of options available and can stand out with an employer.

Don't "just" study Computer Science; get two majors, in Computer Science and Finance, or CS and Marketing, or what have you. Even better if you can get multiple degrees. A BA in Communications is a nice degree, but you need to team it up with a BS in Marketing and suddenly you're a hot commodity on the job market. Doubling up costs you relatively little in the short term other than time (I triple majored and got a BS and BA in undergrad, and only needed one summer semester with three classes to pull it off) but pays major dividends in the long run.

Add in a solid internship and you will be well on your way to a high paying first job.
 
2022-10-03 3:43:17 PM  
I always thought that Rankine was the most useless of degrees.
 
2022-10-03 3:46:18 PM  
Define useful.  Sitting at the bar watching Jeopardy, the plumber at the end of the bar shouting out all the answers definitely has a degree in something.  Not everyone is looking to get ahead in business.
 
2022-10-03 3:49:17 PM  

MusicMakeMyHeadPound: djfitz: I can see a lot of idiots not getting jobs but a competent programmer will make money.

The trouble with this field is that no one wants you if you don't have experience (like, even more so than other fields).

Most job postings try to filter out anyone with less than 5 or 10 years working experience. You can't intern for five years. Tech job postings are notorious for being impossible (my favorite was the guy who invented a product being rejected for not having enough experience with the product). There have been a couple of times that I've a company and, hilariously, I was unqualified (according to the job posting) for positions I effectively created.

At a minimum you need to be lucky and/or an accomplished liar to get into this career. I think most people are too honest for that.


I can tell with certainty, after a long career in the software industry, that experience is not a deal-breaker to getting in the industry.
 
2022-10-03 3:49:43 PM  
The usefulness or uselessness of an education is only an issue in a completely cutthroat, soulless, mercenary society that values literally everything and everyone purely in terms of money.
 
2022-10-03 3:50:13 PM  

nemobeamo: Tr0mBoNe: Computer science
There's been an emphasis in recent years on computer science careers, but that focus has led to an oversaturation of computer science graduates compared to the number of jobs available.
If you still want to get a computer science degree, find ways to make yourself stand out among other applicants such as internships and training or certification in specialized skills.

This is exactly the same as it was in 1994, 2002, 2009 and 2016. People laughed at me for starting a CS degree in 2003 but I've had no problem finding work at any time in my career.

I have a Computer Engineering degree but I went into Software Development.  I get at least a dozen calls a week from different recruiters.


I work for a software company that isn't calling you.
Or anyone else who knows fark all about computers or software.

I swear they throw mud at the wall an the flow charts come of that.
 
2022-10-03 3:51:40 PM  

Shaggy_C: Don't "just" study Computer Science; get two majors, in Computer Science and Finance, or CS and Marketing, or what have you. Even better if you can get multiple degrees. A BA in Communications is a nice degree, but you need to team it up with a BS in Marketing and suddenly you're a hot commodity on the job market. Doubling up costs you relatively little in the short term other than time (I triple majored and got a BS and BA in undergrad, and only needed one summer semester with three classes to pull it off) but pays major dividends in the long run.

Add in a solid internship and you will be well on your way to a high paying first job.


My suggestion would be to spend time to be a good programmer. That will get you far in the industry.
 
2022-10-03 3:55:38 PM  

Shaggy_C: What American kids need to understand in the modern, global economy, they are competing against people in other countries where education is fully subsidised by the state. In other words, the "bare minimum" is no longer going to be a bachelor's degree, but multiple bachelor's or even a master's for many jobs where there is global talent available. As such, I highly recommend diversifying - double or triple major in undergrad so you have a plethora of options available and can stand out with an employer.

Don't "just" study Computer Science; get two majors, in Computer Science and Finance, or CS and Marketing, or what have you. Even better if you can get multiple degrees. A BA in Communications is a nice degree, but you need to team it up with a BS in Marketing and suddenly you're a hot commodity on the job market. Doubling up costs you relatively little in the short term other than time (I triple majored and got a BS and BA in undergrad, and only needed one summer semester with three classes to pull it off) but pays major dividends in the long run.

Add in a solid internship and you will be well on your way to a high paying first job.


Yeah, let's turn a blind eye at the multiple times schools in India and China were outed due to rampant cheating scandals.  The multiple degrees idea is more like watered down education.
 
2022-10-03 3:56:45 PM  
Looks at my MFA in Creative Writing.  Cries.
 
2022-10-03 3:58:13 PM  
Judging by the question queue on Stack Overflow, I don't think my ancient CS degree is at risk of much competition.
 
2022-10-03 4:04:10 PM  

pearls before swine: Define useful.  Sitting at the bar watching Jeopardy, the plumber at the end of the bar shouting out all the answers definitely has a degree in something.  Not everyone is looking to get ahead in business.


Yup... Some of us are happy only climbing so far up the ladder. Me, I like doing helpdesk type stuff, although I'm well past qualified. I just like it. It helps that I'm the sole IT rep in our office, so I run the office as well, but it's ALWAYS nice to have someone above me that I can send people to if they get annoying. I don't want to have to hire and fire people, I don't want to set up network tunnels every day, I love being hands on directly for people, so I am happy at the level I've risen to. Some people just like to settle where they feel comfortable, like you said.
 
2022-10-03 4:04:29 PM  

djfitz: My suggestion would be to spend time to be a good programmer. That will get you far in the industry.


Assuming you want to be a programmer, I suppose. Seems like the kind of career path that tops out at some point lest you return to school for that business degree that you could have just gotten upfront as an add-on at much less personal and financial cost.

Chief Superintendent Lookout: Yeah, let's turn a blind eye at the multiple times schools in India and China were outed due to rampant cheating scandals. The multiple degrees idea is more like watered down education.


I'm talking about Europe, primarily. It was not uncommon to have entry level analysts coming into consulting firms with masters degrees after finishing a 3+2 program. They had zero loan debt and then demand lower wages than their American counterparts. If you don't see that as a risk...well, good luck to your kids.
 
2022-10-03 4:05:29 PM  

nemobeamo: Tr0mBoNe: Computer science
There's been an emphasis in recent years on computer science careers, but that focus has led to an oversaturation of computer science graduates compared to the number of jobs available.
If you still want to get a computer science degree, find ways to make yourself stand out among other applicants such as internships and training or certification in specialized skills.

This is exactly the same as it was in 1994, 2002, 2009 and 2016. People laughed at me for starting a CS degree in 2003 but I've had no problem finding work at any time in my career.

I have a Computer Engineering degree but I went into Software Development.  I get at least a dozen calls a week from different recruiters.


It really depends on the degree. Computer Engineering (or EE) is a lot more valuable than CS. YMMV depending on the school you went to.

I interviewed a candidate years ago with a Masters in CS from University of Nebraska. She only knew html and couldn't solve IsPrime. Yes, you read that right, this really happened. Nebraska should give her money back and apologize.
 
2022-10-03 4:05:56 PM  

djfitz: I would say just about any PhD in the sciences is probably a bigger career non-starter. There haven't been enough tenure positions or post-docs for a long time. Academia is completely farked and a tenure position might as well be a fantasy at this point. Post-docs are pretty slim, even if you wanted to put up with the slave conditions.
A CS degree will get you a job even if you are halfway competent. I can see a lot of idiots not getting jobs but a competent programmer will make money.


Science PhD here, and I'm getting a kick.
 
2022-10-03 4:08:29 PM  
Funny, I didn't see any empirical data attached to those lists.  The whole thing sounds more like half into the second pitcher beer talk:

"Dude, don't go into fashion.  Fashion design has become more popular, and more competitive, with social media and reality competition shows looking for new designers."

"WTF, if they are looking for new designers, wouldn't that negate your point?"

Also:
Fark user imageView Full Size


Too lazy to find another slide, Mr. Listicle?  Or is Gym Tourism a thing?
 
2022-10-03 4:09:10 PM  
Feminist Interpretive Dance curiously missing.
 
2022-10-03 4:20:34 PM  

leviosaurus: nemobeamo: Tr0mBoNe: Computer science
There's been an emphasis in recent years on computer science careers, but that focus has led to an oversaturation of computer science graduates compared to the number of jobs available.
If you still want to get a computer science degree, find ways to make yourself stand out among other applicants such as internships and training or certification in specialized skills.

This is exactly the same as it was in 1994, 2002, 2009 and 2016. People laughed at me for starting a CS degree in 2003 but I've had no problem finding work at any time in my career.

I have a Computer Engineering degree but I went into Software Development.  I get at least a dozen calls a week from different recruiters.

It really depends on the degree. Computer Engineering (or EE) is a lot more valuable than CS. YMMV depending on the school you went to.

I interviewed a candidate years ago with a Masters in CS from University of Nebraska. She only knew html and couldn't solve IsPrime. Yes, you read that right, this really happened. Nebraska should give her money back and apologize.


Until you age out.

As Zuckerberg says, "young people are just smarter"
 
2022-10-03 4:25:55 PM  

mcreadyblue: leviosaurus: nemobeamo: Tr0mBoNe: Computer science
There's been an emphasis in recent years on computer science careers, but that focus has led to an oversaturation of computer science graduates compared to the number of jobs available.
If you still want to get a computer science degree, find ways to make yourself stand out among other applicants such as internships and training or certification in specialized skills.

This is exactly the same as it was in 1994, 2002, 2009 and 2016. People laughed at me for starting a CS degree in 2003 but I've had no problem finding work at any time in my career.

I have a Computer Engineering degree but I went into Software Development.  I get at least a dozen calls a week from different recruiters.

It really depends on the degree. Computer Engineering (or EE) is a lot more valuable than CS. YMMV depending on the school you went to.

I interviewed a candidate years ago with a Masters in CS from University of Nebraska. She only knew html and couldn't solve IsPrime. Yes, you read that right, this really happened. Nebraska should give her money back and apologize.

Until you age out.

As Zuckerberg says, "young people are just smarter"


Smart enough to duck a backhand slap?
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-10-03 4:25:57 PM  

mcreadyblue: As Zuckerberg says, "young people are just smarter"


Explains why Facebook sucks more the older he gets.
 
2022-10-03 4:32:16 PM  
pro tip: computer science isn't about software, computers, or anything likely to be useful day-to-day. it's mostly about the science of how we compute, information theory, complexity theory, and other hard mathy stuff.  there are other degrees these days if you want to be a bit-basher.

ymmv if you want to work for google,  but you'll need a phd for that anyway.
 
2022-10-03 4:43:38 PM  

leviosaurus: nemobeamo: Tr0mBoNe: Computer science
There's been an emphasis in recent years on computer science careers, but that focus has led to an oversaturation of computer science graduates compared to the number of jobs available.
If you still want to get a computer science degree, find ways to make yourself stand out among other applicants such as internships and training or certification in specialized skills.

This is exactly the same as it was in 1994, 2002, 2009 and 2016. People laughed at me for starting a CS degree in 2003 but I've had no problem finding work at any time in my career.

I have a Computer Engineering degree but I went into Software Development.  I get at least a dozen calls a week from different recruiters.

It really depends on the degree. Computer Engineering (or EE) is a lot more valuable than CS. YMMV depending on the school you went to.

I interviewed a candidate years ago with a Masters in CS from University of Nebraska. She only knew html and couldn't solve IsPrime. Yes, you read that right, this really happened. Nebraska should give her money back and apologize.


Back in my undergrad days, we had a CS teacher that made us learn assembly to teach us about low level hardware.  One of her assignments was to generate all primes from 0 to 100 and, for the life of me, I could not stop identifying 4 as a goddamned prime.

So I defined 4 as a constant with some name like eax = 4, then set ebx = eax later in the code, then set ecx = ebx, and finally in the print statement I checked the value against ecx and would not print if it was true (4).

She did not catch that cheat and I got a 100 on the assignment.

/CSB
 
2022-10-03 5:00:25 PM  
Hmmm....c++ dev with focus on threading, computational efficiency, memory management, and math...I make a good back-end guy if you're doing hard things.  That's pretty specialized.  I dread finding another job if I ever need to do so.  Nearing 50 doesn't help.
 
2022-10-03 5:06:34 PM  

Shaggy_C: djfitz: My suggestion would be to spend time to be a good programmer. That will get you far in the industry.

Assuming you want to be a programmer, I suppose. Seems like the kind of career path that tops out at some point lest you return to school for that business degree that you could have just gotten upfront as an add-on at much less personal and financial cost.

Chief Superintendent Lookout: Yeah, let's turn a blind eye at the multiple times schools in India and China were outed due to rampant cheating scandals. The multiple degrees idea is more like watered down education.

I'm talking about Europe, primarily. It was not uncommon to have entry level analysts coming into consulting firms with masters degrees after finishing a 3+2 program. They had zero loan debt and then demand lower wages than their American counterparts. If you don't see that as a risk...well, good luck to your kids.


For every job that insists upon x-years degree or whatnot there are probably a dozen that still say, "You know some of the basics?  Cool, we'll train you up in-house".  A lot of current high paying cloud jobs are handled by people who obtained certifications rather than a degree.  I've been working in IT since the 90s, and all I've heard since the 80s was how there are more job openings than people to fill them.  I keep getting reminders from Pluralsight that I am eligible for free skills training so I can prepare for Amazon, Google, or Azure cloud certifications.  Anyone who gets a foot in the door with basic cloud skills can ramp up very quickly to higher paying jobs.  The problem/issue with the folks you point out from Europe is like anyone fresh from college, which is there severe lack of real world experience.  I don't know about the other aspects of IT, but a majority of junior devs fresh out of college still have a lot to learn when it comes to problem solving and coding.

I changed jobs earlier this year, which took me all of three weeks of interviews and weeding out places I knew would suck.  I came from an organization where I reported to an IT Director who has zero college.  He's a rare case, but they exist.
 
2022-10-03 5:34:12 PM  
I got a degree in mechanical engineering when I needed a degree in business. I had a business idea and needed some engineering. Four years later I found you can buy engineers, but the business idea is another kettle of fish.
 
2022-10-03 5:43:16 PM  

Mikey1969: pearls before swine: Define useful.  Sitting at the bar watching Jeopardy, the plumber at the end of the bar shouting out all the answers definitely has a degree in something.  Not everyone is looking to get ahead in business.

Yup... Some of us are happy only climbing so far up the ladder. Me, I like doing helpdesk type stuff, although I'm well past qualified. I just like it. It helps that I'm the sole IT rep in our office, so I run the office as well, but it's ALWAYS nice to have someone above me that I can send people to if they get annoying. I don't want to have to hire and fire people, I don't want to set up network tunnels every day, I love being hands on directly for people, so I am happy at the level I've risen to. Some people just like to settle where they feel comfortable, like you said.


This - as a CS major who works in data science without having to manage anyone, I concur. Not having to politic and herd cats is worth leaving well enough alone.

/ 40-45hr per week > 60hr per week + employee drama for 20-30% more salary
 
2022-10-03 5:51:40 PM  

scumm: pro tip: computer science isn't about software, computers, or anything likely to be useful day-to-day. it's mostly about the science of how we compute, information theory, complexity theory, and other hard mathy stuff.  there are other degrees these days if you want to be a bit-basher.

ymmv if you want to work for google,  but you'll need a phd for that anyway.


I doubt that even 1% of the engineers at Google have a PhD.
 
2022-10-03 6:13:13 PM  

Tr0mBoNe: Computer science
There's been an emphasis in recent years on computer science careers, but that focus has led to an oversaturation of computer science graduates compared to the number of jobs available.
If you still want to get a computer science degree, find ways to make yourself stand out among other applicants such as internships and training or certification in specialized skills.

This is exactly the same as it was in 1994, 2002, 2009 and 2016. People laughed at me for starting a CS degree in 2003 but I've had no problem finding work at any time in my career.


Buy Learn the dip!
 
2022-10-03 6:37:16 PM  

OptionC: scumm: pro tip: computer science isn't about software, computers, or anything likely to be useful day-to-day. it's mostly about the science of how we compute, information theory, complexity theory, and other hard mathy stuff.  there are other degrees these days if you want to be a bit-basher.

ymmv if you want to work for google,  but you'll need a phd for that anyway.

I doubt that even 1% of the engineers at Google have a PhD.


And most that do got a degree from the college down the street (well, a very long street) from their HQ.

/IE, Stanford
 
2022-10-03 6:41:34 PM  
How does one make a list of the most useless degrees and not put "Any degree from Trump University" at the top of the list?
 
2022-10-03 6:51:24 PM  
No degree here. I tried once or twice after 6 years in the Army but just didn't work out for me. I am a "builder/fixer" by inner passion and just have a way of understanding any device, machine, appliance, vehicle, and so on. I am also high functioning ASD with LOTS of sub conditions and I work best in very small groups or alone. I have learned to use those conditions to parlay my skills and abilities into a nice living and have worked at some interesting places.

/In between jobs now, resigned a few months ago to take a few months off as a mental break.
//Interviewed with former employer a few weeks ago because they called me and did everything over the phone.
///Offer sitting in Inbox now. PHX to PDX is a possibility.
 
2022-10-03 7:23:12 PM  

sleze: leviosaurus: nemobeamo: Tr0mBoNe: Computer science
There's been an emphasis in recent years on computer science careers, but that focus has led to an oversaturation of computer science graduates compared to the number of jobs available.
If you still want to get a computer science degree, find ways to make yourself stand out among other applicants such as internships and training or certification in specialized skills.

This is exactly the same as it was in 1994, 2002, 2009 and 2016. People laughed at me for starting a CS degree in 2003 but I've had no problem finding work at any time in my career.

I have a Computer Engineering degree but I went into Software Development.  I get at least a dozen calls a week from different recruiters.

It really depends on the degree. Computer Engineering (or EE) is a lot more valuable than CS. YMMV depending on the school you went to.

I interviewed a candidate years ago with a Masters in CS from University of Nebraska. She only knew html and couldn't solve IsPrime. Yes, you read that right, this really happened. Nebraska should give her money back and apologize.

Back in my undergrad days, we had a CS teacher that made us learn assembly to teach us about low level hardware.  One of her assignments was to generate all primes from 0 to 100 and, for the life of me, I could not stop identifying 4 as a goddamned prime.

So I defined 4 as a constant with some name like eax = 4, then set ebx = eax later in the code, then set ecx = ebx, and finally in the print statement I checked the value against ecx and would not print if it was true (4).

She did not catch that cheat and I got a 100 on the assignment.

/CSB


You can do the whole thing in about ten lines using arithmatic operators and a goto loop. I did it in one of my first programming classes.
 
2022-10-03 7:34:47 PM  
We have 10 open programmer head count in a 20 person department. Can't find competent people. Our company is growing too fast. CS is very valuable right now. Maybe not in 10 years when it's all outsourced like the fate of our art department.

/ vet programmer
// Had to disable my voicemail due to non-stop recruiter calls
 
2022-10-03 7:47:37 PM  

OptionC: scumm: pro tip: computer science isn't about software, computers, or anything likely to be useful day-to-day. it's mostly about the science of how we compute, information theory, complexity theory, and other hard mathy stuff.  there are other degrees these days if you want to be a bit-basher.

ymmv if you want to work for google,  but you'll need a phd for that anyway.

I doubt that even 1% of the engineers at Google have a PhD.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-10-03 7:50:46 PM  
I like that it included Criminal Justice because America and Law Enforcement. Rather different for our countries.
 
2022-10-03 8:03:27 PM  

Tr0mBoNe: Computer science
There's been an emphasis in recent years on computer science careers, but that focus has led to an oversaturation of computer science graduates compared to the number of jobs available.
If you still want to get a computer science degree, find ways to make yourself stand out among other applicants such as internships and training or certification in specialized skills.

This is exactly the same as it was in 1994, 2002, 2009 and 2016. People laughed at me for starting a CS degree in 2003 but I've had no problem finding work at any time in my career.


I got my CS degree in 2004. I have never been hurting for work, even in 2008 when the economy fell on its face, and in 2020 when COVID shut down everything.

A CS degree is pretty versatile. Even if you don't like cranking out code all day, you can get into machine learning, AI, data analytics, or system analysis.
 
2022-10-03 8:20:41 PM  

TedCruz'sCrazyDad: OptionC: scumm: pro tip: computer science isn't about software, computers, or anything likely to be useful day-to-day. it's mostly about the science of how we compute, information theory, complexity theory, and other hard mathy stuff.  there are other degrees these days if you want to be a bit-basher.

ymmv if you want to work for google,  but you'll need a phd for that anyway.

I doubt that even 1% of the engineers at Google have a PhD.

[Fark user image image 850x892]


Where are GEDs listed?
 
2022-10-03 8:40:23 PM  

leviosaurus: sleze: leviosaurus: nemobeamo: Tr0mBoNe: Computer science
There's been an emphasis in recent years on computer science careers, but that focus has led to an oversaturation of computer science graduates compared to the number of jobs available.
If you still want to get a computer science degree, find ways to make yourself stand out among other applicants such as internships and training or certification in specialized skills.

This is exactly the same as it was in 1994, 2002, 2009 and 2016. People laughed at me for starting a CS degree in 2003 but I've had no problem finding work at any time in my career.

I have a Computer Engineering degree but I went into Software Development.  I get at least a dozen calls a week from different recruiters.

It really depends on the degree. Computer Engineering (or EE) is a lot more valuable than CS. YMMV depending on the school you went to.

I interviewed a candidate years ago with a Masters in CS from University of Nebraska. She only knew html and couldn't solve IsPrime. Yes, you read that right, this really happened. Nebraska should give her money back and apologize.

Back in my undergrad days, we had a CS teacher that made us learn assembly to teach us about low level hardware.  One of her assignments was to generate all primes from 0 to 100 and, for the life of me, I could not stop identifying 4 as a goddamned prime.

So I defined 4 as a constant with some name like eax = 4, then set ebx = eax later in the code, then set ecx = ebx, and finally in the print statement I checked the value against ecx and would not print if it was true (4).

She did not catch that cheat and I got a 100 on the assignment.

/CSB

You can do the whole thing in about ten lines using arithmatic operators and a goto loop. I did it in one of my first programming classes.


That's why it was so frustrating.  At the time I could do it in my sleep in C and Java (or prolog for that matter).  But assembly just flumoxed me.
 
2022-10-03 9:10:34 PM  
I know this isn't a career-help forum. But what would you tech studs do if you wanted a new career in your mid-30s, in today's world? I did the humanities, and am excellent at my job, but now I want 2x-3x more money. I'm pretty sure I could be a software developer/engineer/etc. Uncle was a highly paid, successful software engineer for 40 years. Other family member also have job requiring high intelligence. Learn to code? Doesn't sound fun, but like I said, I want moola.
 
2022-10-03 9:17:45 PM  

Explodo: Hmmm....c++ dev with focus on threading, computational efficiency, memory management, and math...I make a good back-end guy if you're doing hard things.  That's pretty specialized.  I dread finding another job if I ever need to do so.  Nearing 50 doesn't help.


You have nothing to worry about.  C++ devs are still in demand, plus your skills are transferrable to other languages and processes.
 
2022-10-03 9:22:46 PM  

Arrant Knave: I know this isn't a career-help forum. But what would you tech studs do if you wanted a new career in your mid-30s, in today's world? I did the humanities, and am excellent at my job, but now I want 2x-3x more money. I'm pretty sure I could be a software developer/engineer/etc. Uncle was a highly paid, successful software engineer for 40 years. Other family member also have job requiring high intelligence. Learn to code? Doesn't sound fun, but like I said, I want moola.


You might look into one of the coding boot camps.
 
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