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(MSN)   Ocean's Six   (msn.com) divider line
    More: Cool, Water, Earth, Mantle, Crust, Olivine, Lithosphere, international team of scientists, transition zone  
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1552 clicks; posted to STEM » on 01 Oct 2022 at 8:30 PM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



16 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-10-01 5:53:07 PM  
"We were wrong about the number of oceans we have".

"You tossers! You had one job to do!"
 
2022-10-01 7:10:55 PM  
How long before we pollute it so we have to buy water?
 
2022-10-01 7:50:07 PM  
TIL there's a Southern Ocean.
 
2022-10-01 9:10:09 PM  

dstanley: TIL there's a Southern Ocean.


We've lost a planet and gained an ocean since my school days.
 
2022-10-01 9:11:47 PM  
Polarization in the United States is worse than I thought.

img-s-msn-com.akamaized.netView Full Size
 
2022-10-01 9:12:50 PM  
That is where all the water from the Noah's flood went.
:)
 
2022-10-01 9:33:20 PM  
Based on extremophile bacteria that we already know about, I would not be surprised to learn that there are bacteria that survive and thrive despite the pressure and heat in this sixth ocean between the mantles.
 
2022-10-01 9:47:12 PM  
The transition zone between the Earth's upper (brown) and lower mantle (orange) contains considerable amounts of water, bound in the rock.

So not an ocean, but an ocean's worth of hydrates in mineral form.
 
2022-10-01 10:10:22 PM  

FarkingChas: That is where all the water from the Noah's flood went.
:)


Funny you should say that, there was recently a paper making the rounds in pop science reporting about how Earth might have started out as a 'water world' and we've been reading the geological record all wrong.

Apparently, as the Earth's core has cooled the water-carrying capacity of the mantle has increased, and geological activity has been steadily sequestering surface water over time.  It could hold something like 4x the amount of water you'd currently find in the surface oceans.

https://earthsky.org/earth/ancient-earth-water-world-global-ocean-harvard/

Still, nothing there to back up the biblical stories - nor any flood myth - as Earth's 'water world' period started and ended long before complex life evolved on land.
 
2022-10-02 5:08:55 AM  

common sense is an oxymoron: The transition zone between the Earth's upper (brown) and lower mantle (orange) contains considerable amounts of water, bound in the rock.

So not an ocean, but an ocean's worth of hydrates in mineral form.


What I'm hearing is that the ocean is transitioning.  Better let conservatives know so they can start boycotting it.
 
2022-10-02 6:21:16 AM  

tricycleracer: dstanley: TIL there's a Southern Ocean.

We've lost a planet and gained an ocean since my school days.


This is also news to me.
 
2022-10-02 1:08:52 PM  

Unsung_Hero: FarkingChas: That is where all the water from the Noah's flood went.
:)

Funny you should say that, there was recently a paper making the rounds in pop science reporting about how Earth might have started out as a 'water world' and we've been reading the geological record all wrong.

Apparently, as the Earth's core has cooled the water-carrying capacity of the mantle has increased, and geological activity has been steadily sequestering surface water over time.  It could hold something like 4x the amount of water you'd currently find in the surface oceans.

https://earthsky.org/earth/ancient-earth-water-world-global-ocean-harvard/

Still, nothing there to back up the biblical stories - nor any flood myth - as Earth's 'water world' period started and ended long before complex life evolved on land.


I read a different story that said this layer contains something like three times the water on the surface.  Meaning if only PART of it originally was on the surface... the Earth was covered with water.
 
2022-10-02 1:24:02 PM  

Kris_Romm: Unsung_Hero: FarkingChas: That is where all the water from the Noah's flood went.
:)

Funny you should say that, there was recently a paper making the rounds in pop science reporting about how Earth might have started out as a 'water world' and we've been reading the geological record all wrong.

Apparently, as the Earth's core has cooled the water-carrying capacity of the mantle has increased, and geological activity has been steadily sequestering surface water over time.  It could hold something like 4x the amount of water you'd currently find in the surface oceans.

https://earthsky.org/earth/ancient-earth-water-world-global-ocean-harvard/

Still, nothing there to back up the biblical stories - nor any flood myth - as Earth's 'water world' period started and ended long before complex life evolved on land.

I read a different story that said this layer contains something like three times the water on the surface.  Meaning if only PART of it originally was on the surface... the Earth was covered with water.


There is nothing to suggest that all of this "water" was on the surface at the same time. Even if these hydrated minerals did originate as surface water, the only plausible mechanism for transporting them 660 km underground is subduction via plate tectonics over billions of years.
 
2022-10-02 6:57:59 PM  

common sense is an oxymoron: Kris_Romm: Unsung_Hero: FarkingChas: That is where all the water from the Noah's flood went.
:)

Funny you should say that, there was recently a paper making the rounds in pop science reporting about how Earth might have started out as a 'water world' and we've been reading the geological record all wrong.

Apparently, as the Earth's core has cooled the water-carrying capacity of the mantle has increased, and geological activity has been steadily sequestering surface water over time.  It could hold something like 4x the amount of water you'd currently find in the surface oceans.

https://earthsky.org/earth/ancient-earth-water-world-global-ocean-harvard/

Still, nothing there to back up the biblical stories - nor any flood myth - as Earth's 'water world' period started and ended long before complex life evolved on land.

I read a different story that said this layer contains something like three times the water on the surface.  Meaning if only PART of it originally was on the surface... the Earth was covered with water.

There is nothing to suggest that all of this "water" was on the surface at the same time. Even if these hydrated minerals did originate as surface water, the only plausible mechanism for transporting them 660 km underground is subduction via plate tectonics over billions of years.


RTFA, it's explained.
 
2022-10-02 7:35:29 PM  
David Byrne was right.

i.pinimg.comView Full Size
 
2022-10-02 8:12:57 PM  

Unsung_Hero: common sense is an oxymoron: Kris_Romm: Unsung_Hero: FarkingChas: That is where all the water from the Noah's flood went.
:)

Funny you should say that, there was recently a paper making the rounds in pop science reporting about how Earth might have started out as a 'water world' and we've been reading the geological record all wrong.

Apparently, as the Earth's core has cooled the water-carrying capacity of the mantle has increased, and geological activity has been steadily sequestering surface water over time.  It could hold something like 4x the amount of water you'd currently find in the surface oceans.

https://earthsky.org/earth/ancient-earth-water-world-global-ocean-harvard/

Still, nothing there to back up the biblical stories - nor any flood myth - as Earth's 'water world' period started and ended long before complex life evolved on land.

I read a different story that said this layer contains something like three times the water on the surface.  Meaning if only PART of it originally was on the surface... the Earth was covered with water.

There is nothing to suggest that all of this "water" was on the surface at the same time. Even if these hydrated minerals did originate as surface water, the only plausible mechanism for transporting them 660 km underground is subduction via plate tectonics over billions of years.

RTFA, it's explained.


Yep. Water is incorporated into the subducting plate, becomes "bound in the rock" under heat and pressure, and is therefore no longer present as free H2O. What did I miss?
 
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