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(Twitter)   Strong-ass cranes laugh at your Hurricane Ian   (twitter.com) divider line
    More: Scary, shot  
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1392 clicks; posted to D'awww » on 01 Oct 2022 at 10:41 PM (9 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



16 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-10-01 12:17:19 PM  
Original Tweet:

 
2022-10-01 8:39:37 PM  
finally some good drama. I could watch an hour of that
 
2022-10-01 10:45:53 PM  
Ass cranes?
 
2022-10-01 10:55:51 PM  
not a good day for flying
 
2022-10-01 11:32:57 PM  
Kinda reminds you that most birds are extremely aerodynamic.
 
2022-10-02 2:01:02 AM  
When faced with that kind of wind, don't crane. Spread-eagle instead.
 
2022-10-02 4:12:07 AM  

wxboy: When faced with that kind of wind, don't crane. Spread-eagle instead.


Stay aware of your surroundings, know when to duck
 
2022-10-02 9:28:58 AM  
This is the first time I have ever seen sandhills with necks tucked like herons do. Shows how strong those winds are that they felt they needed to protect themselves like that.

Main way to ID a crane vs. a heron at a glance: herons keep their necks tucked, both in flight and at rest. Cranes keep their neck straight, both in flight at at rest.

My local sandhill family back in May (the smaller colt did not make it but the other looks just like its parents now and is ready to fly South soon):

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-10-02 11:05:30 AM  

catmandu: This is the first time I have ever seen sandhills with necks tucked like herons do. Shows how strong those winds are that they felt they needed to protect themselves like that.

Main way to ID a crane vs. a heron at a glance: herons keep their necks tucked, both in flight and at rest. Cranes keep their neck straight, both in flight at at rest.

My local sandhill family back in May (the smaller colt did not make it but the other looks just like its parents now and is ready to fly South soon):

[Fark user image 850x564]


These also live by my parents house. In case some of you fellow farkers don't know, Sandhill Cranes are very large. The ones by my folks are a good 5' tall if not taller.
 
2022-10-02 12:17:03 PM  

catmandu: My local sandhill family back in May (the smaller colt did not make it but the other looks just like its parents now and is ready to fly South soon):


This video is described as an adult pair and their 2 children.
https://viralhog.com/v?t=pz9xispo6p
Sandhill Cranes Endure Hurricane Ian
Occurred on September 28, 2022 / Bradenton, Florida, USA
Info from Licensor: It was during hurricane Ian and I was watching the radar and noticed the eye would be over us soon. I got in the car with my daughter and we went across the street to where they have open fields so I could try and get a shot of the eye wall. As we entered the parking lot we found sandhill cranes headed into the wind. They are usually in groups of four. Male, female and two children.
Posted By Casey Clifton


The full video is longer, 1:18 vs. 0:19 , but isn't much more interesting.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RCM4UnlS9sY
Sandhill Cranes Endure Hurricane Ian || ViralHog
Youtube RCM4UnlS9sY
 
2022-10-02 2:38:52 PM  

HairBolus: catmandu: My local sandhill family back in May (the smaller colt did not make it but the other looks just like its parents now and is ready to fly South soon):

This video is described as an adult pair and their 2 children.
https://viralhog.com/v?t=pz9xispo6p
Sandhill Cranes Endure Hurricane Ian
Occurred on September 28, 2022 / Bradenton, Florida, USA
Info from Licensor: It was during hurricane Ian and I was watching the radar and noticed the eye would be over us soon. I got in the car with my daughter and we went across the street to where they have open fields so I could try and get a shot of the eye wall. As we entered the parking lot we found sandhill cranes headed into the wind. They are usually in groups of four. Male, female and two children.
Posted By Casey Clifton

The full video is longer, 1:18 vs. 0:19 , but isn't much more interesting.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RCM4UnlS9sY
[Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/RCM4UnlS9sY]


Here in the frozen north they typically only raise one colt to migratory age. Cranes lay 2 eggs and usually hatch both but lose one during the summer. I wonder if there are some advantages to being a permanent population over a migratory one, besides the obvious of the migration itself. Most of our sandhills and all of our Whooping Cranes migrate to Florida. A few sandhill groups go to Texas instead.
 
2022-10-02 3:10:02 PM  
imgs.xkcd.comView Full Size


/You've changed, Fark.
 
2022-10-02 6:02:28 PM  
Hurricranes
 
2022-10-02 6:20:42 PM  

MelGoesOnTour: catmandu: This is the first time I have ever seen sandhills with necks tucked like herons do. Shows how strong those winds are that they felt they needed to protect themselves like that.

Main way to ID a crane vs. a heron at a glance: herons keep their necks tucked, both in flight and at rest. Cranes keep their neck straight, both in flight at at rest.

My local sandhill family back in May (the smaller colt did not make it but the other looks just like its parents now and is ready to fly South soon):

[Fark user image 850x564]

These also live by my parents house. In case some of you fellow farkers don't know, Sandhill Cranes are very large. The ones by my folks are a good 5' tall if not taller.


And they have no fear of people. I remember one absolutely refusing to move to let me into my car. It just stood by the driver's side door for a good 10 minutes while I stood there trying to shoo it away.
 
2022-10-02 8:48:47 PM  

ElPrimitivo: MelGoesOnTour: catmandu: This is the first time I have ever seen sandhills with necks tucked like herons do. Shows how strong those winds are that they felt they needed to protect themselves like that.

Main way to ID a crane vs. a heron at a glance: herons keep their necks tucked, both in flight and at rest. Cranes keep their neck straight, both in flight at at rest.

My local sandhill family back in May (the smaller colt did not make it but the other looks just like its parents now and is ready to fly South soon):

[Fark user image 850x564]

These also live by my parents house. In case some of you fellow farkers don't know, Sandhill Cranes are very large. The ones by my folks are a good 5' tall if not taller.

And they have no fear of people. I remember one absolutely refusing to move to let me into my car. It just stood by the driver's side door for a good 10 minutes while I stood there trying to shoo it away.


Not sure if it's a lack of f*cks or a lack of brainpower, but the end result is the same.  They will cross the road at any moment, at their own pace (VERY leisurely), and you cannot affect their behavior by moving closer or using your horn. Florida Sandhill Cranes are a protected species.

Alligators don't scare them much.

Crane Ushers Alligator Off Golf Course in Orlando
Youtube Q2NeRxjYiTI
 
2022-10-02 9:04:05 PM  

another one of them: ElPrimitivo: MelGoesOnTour: catmandu: This is the first time I have ever seen sandhills with necks tucked like herons do. Shows how strong those winds are that they felt they needed to protect themselves like that.

Main way to ID a crane vs. a heron at a glance: herons keep their necks tucked, both in flight and at rest. Cranes keep their neck straight, both in flight at at rest.

My local sandhill family back in May (the smaller colt did not make it but the other looks just like its parents now and is ready to fly South soon):

[Fark user image 850x564]

These also live by my parents house. In case some of you fellow farkers don't know, Sandhill Cranes are very large. The ones by my folks are a good 5' tall if not taller.

And they have no fear of people. I remember one absolutely refusing to move to let me into my car. It just stood by the driver's side door for a good 10 minutes while I stood there trying to shoo it away.

Not sure if it's a lack of f*cks or a lack of brainpower, but the end result is the same.  They will cross the road at any moment, at their own pace (VERY leisurely), and you cannot affect their behavior by moving closer or using your horn. Florida Sandhill Cranes are a protected species.

Alligators don't scare them much.

[iFrame https://www.youtube.com/embed/Q2NeRxjYiTI?autoplay=1&widget_referrer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&start=0&enablejsapi=1&origin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&widgetid=1]


They are a protected species here in Wisconsin too. We made them extinct in the state by over hunting and habitat destruction. My Dad was born in 1919 and remembers them when he was a boy. I was born in 1956 and never heard of them (although I read how critically endangered Whooping Cranes were). I saw my first wild cranes in 1996. I remember it well because it was Easter and Dad wanted to go for a drive to see if any were gathering. We saw a group and a couple were doing their mating dance. Dad made the comment that he never thought his children would see what he knew from his childhood. Dad passed away a month later. If there is such a thing as a spirit animal, cranes are mine.

It helps that my hometown is 20 miles away from the International Crane Foundation which has been instrumental in bringing Sandhills back to Wisconsin as well as breeding Whoopers. They were once down to less than 50 individuals but now are over 800 including a couple of migratory populations.
 
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