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(ABC News)   *blows pitchpipe* *calls insurance provider* - The wind began to switch.. the house.. to pitch.. and suddenly the hinges started to.. unhitch..just then..the, yes, I'll hold   (abcnews.go.com) divider line
    More: Followup, Insurance, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, disaster recovery centers, financial assistance, financial help, combination of insurance, homeowners insurance, Jimmy Patronis  
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2921 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Oct 2022 at 2:05 AM (10 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



34 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-09-30 9:13:38 PM  
Whereas the Rs, if in power and this happened in a blue state, would be pitching a fit for having to "help the deadbeats", Ds just get down to work and helping people.
 
2022-09-30 9:38:03 PM  
Insurance failures are going to be the longest-lasting effect of Ian. Some of those homes are uninsured. Some have homeowners insurance, which won't cover flood damage. Few have actual flood insurance. Tons of people will be permanently hurt by this.

Add in how many insurance companies have already left Florida due to losses, and how many more will do so after the losses from Ian, and the lack of insurance availability is going to be a continuing disaster for years.

DeSantis had the opportunity to do something about this for years, and ignored doing it in favor of waging a culture war instead.

Florida is one of the states that does not require sellers to disclose previous flooding to buyers, by the way.
 
2022-10-01 1:35:50 AM  
What I can't understand is why, in a place that gets hiat by hurricanes nearly every year, they seem so unprepared every single year
 
2022-10-01 2:11:22 AM  
i.imgflip.comView Full Size
 
2022-10-01 2:16:21 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size


/IYKYK
//All the cool kids had one!
 
2022-10-01 2:20:18 AM  
Footage of insurance agent's response:

c.tenor.comView Full Size
 
2022-10-01 2:24:31 AM  
Insurance company: "Did you say your house was destroyed by a flood? Or by a fire?"
You: "Yes"

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-10-01 2:24:43 AM  
When working with their insurance carrier, homeowners should discuss next steps they can take to help reduce future losses from natural disasters, such as by putting a tarp on their house, Smith said.

I know the point is to help, but... something really tells me a tarp isn't going to do sh*t with those kinds of winds, buddy.
 
2022-10-01 2:35:09 AM  

nytmare: Insurance company: "Did you say your house was destroyed by a flood? Or by a fire?"
You: "Yes"

[Fark user image image 850x478]


Only report the fire! Fires are covered by basically all homeowners policies and they're not going to drop you for a fire claim like they likely will for a flood claim. Then again it might become a moot point if all the insurers and reinsurers stop offering coverage in the state.
 
2022-10-01 2:45:36 AM  
Zero reason for the Federal Government to bail out property owners that choose to live in an area guaranteed to be hit by structure destroying weather.
 
2022-10-01 3:13:02 AM  
Just goes to show you that Eminem is just like everyone else.
 
2022-10-01 3:15:36 AM  
Mexico Beach got federal grants of 100 million dollars to rebuild. Hotels mostly.
 
2022-10-01 3:18:38 AM  

A_Flying_Toaster: When working with their insurance carrier, homeowners should discuss next steps they can take to help reduce future losses from natural disasters, such as by putting a tarp on their house, Smith said.
I know the point is to help, but... something really tells me a tarp isn't going to do sh*t with those kinds of winds, buddy.


It saves all those people in the Philippines, though. None of them ever get killed by hurricanes.

Hurricane tarps.  I guess they are a real thing.

canvasandcanopy.comView Full Size
 
2022-10-01 4:19:38 AM  
As mentioned above, insurers leaving the state will result in a market correction that hopefully will end with fewer Floridians making the news, so there is a silver lining.  It is terrible for the people caught up in it though, I can't even imagine.  I guess that's why I don't live in a GTFO storm zone.

I'm not trying to be an asshole, but climate change is real and people need to understand this if we want to have less suffering in the world.
 
2022-10-01 6:14:44 AM  
All the carefully noted pauses made me laugh. You have seen Wizard of Oz so, so, SO many times.
 
2022-10-01 6:32:52 AM  
Charley : 2004. Irma : 2017. Iain : 2022

After Katrina and Wilma in 2005, 250,000 people moved from New Orleans.
 
2022-10-01 7:17:58 AM  
"State officials have warned of scams amid the recovery."

Scams? In Florida? Fetch me my fainting couch!
 
2022-10-01 8:57:24 AM  
Wait until everyone finds out what the current cost of building materials are and that supply chain has really farked up availability of some materials. Oh and contractors have inflated their way to the moon (I don't blame them, that's just the way it is).

/ It'll probably be 50K just to replace half of the shingles on a 1500sq ft rambler
 
2022-10-01 8:59:46 AM  

A_Flying_Toaster: When working with their insurance carrier, homeowners should discuss next steps they can take to help reduce future losses from natural disasters, such as by putting a tarp on their house, Smith said.

I know the point is to help, but... something really tells me a tarp isn't going to do sh*t with those kinds of winds, buddy.


Shingles have lots of edges that can be lifted up and once they start entire rows go with it. A tarp is continuous so as long as it's secured properly it will be way better than not having one. Sounds weird but I can see it being helpful and if I can save my roof and my property inside from water damage by purchasing a cheap tarp then sounds like a win for me and insurance.
 
2022-10-01 9:02:17 AM  
I know how angry i was to find out homeowners insurance didn't cover flooding...and I'm up in PA.
Those that are newer to FL and thought they were covered are especially screwed.
 
2022-10-01 9:11:53 AM  
Riding out the storm was the easy part.
Good luck to everyone filing a claim.
 
2022-10-01 10:02:43 AM  
If I lived in Florida I would likely rent instead of own. Just take my computer and run. When the property gets blown away just terminate the lease. I'm guessing because it's Florida it's not that easy?
 
2022-10-01 10:30:51 AM  
Bravo, subby!
 
2022-10-01 10:41:18 AM  
Insurance is the worst.

Imagine putting $100 a week into a savings account.  Then after years of doing so you need to use a small fraction of what you saved only to be charged/penalized or even denied the use of your money.
 
2022-10-01 10:47:43 AM  
"Lollipop Guild Property Casualty Insurance, may I help you? Yes, Ms. Gale,,,there seems to be a problem with your claim. Apparently the IRS has a lien in regard to unpaid taxes on a..., it's says here, a pair of jeweled slippers? Anyway, until that's cleared up..., what?  No, I'm afraid psychotherapy for your helper-lion service animal isn't covered either."
 
2022-10-01 10:55:45 AM  
We see this kind of destruction happen year after year and it keeps getting worse. So why do people keep moving into those areas and/or rebuilding their homes there? Or at the very least, not making great efforts to build in a way that will protect them from damage?

There's a point at which it's not as much a personal tragedy anymore and is more of a "well, you moved into a farked up state as well as into an area that gets destroyed by hurricanes. what the fark did you think would happen?!"
 
2022-10-01 11:49:08 AM  
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2022-10-01 12:27:59 PM  

A_Flying_Toaster: When working with their insurance carrier, homeowners should discuss next steps they can take to help reduce future losses from natural disasters, such as by putting a tarp on their house, Smith said.

I know the point is to help, but... something really tells me a tarp isn't going to do sh*t with those kinds of winds, buddy.


I read it as what can people do NOW to prevent further future damage to the property, such as tarping over holes until they can be repaired.

But maybe I read it wrong?
 
2022-10-01 12:33:23 PM  
i mean you can't get insurance if you build in the known area of an active volcano and known lava flow zones...

Also if you do willfully build in the path of a known active volcano, are you really the victim of it?

And hurricane/flood zones are no less known...
 
2022-10-01 12:51:27 PM  
If you build on a swamp that is 1' above sea-level and annually experiences hurricanes during actual "hurricane season", I'd prefer my insurance premiums and taxes not bail you out every single time. Insurance is supposed to be for unforeseen emergencies, not to subsidize your poor grasp of geography. Not only that, but the people who continually lose their homes to this shiat are the ones claiming the climate "just isn't that bad". I've owned a home in Michigan for 26 years and never made an insurance claim.
 
2022-10-01 1:44:01 PM  

robodog: Only report the fire! Fires are covered by basically all homeowners policies and they're not going to drop you for a fire claim like they likely will for a flood claim. Then again it might become a moot point if all the insurers and reinsurers stop offering coverage in the state.


Where I live if you have an earthquake and it starts a fire in your house, and you don't have earthquake insurance, no dice. The root cause of the fire was the earthquake.
 
2022-10-01 3:15:05 PM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: What I can't understand is why, in a place that gets hiat by hurricanes nearly every year, they seem so unprepared every single year


They said I was daft to build a house in the path of hurricanes....
 
2022-10-01 3:23:00 PM  

GaperKiller: robodog: Only report the fire! Fires are covered by basically all homeowners policies and they're not going to drop you for a fire claim like they likely will for a flood claim. Then again it might become a moot point if all the insurers and reinsurers stop offering coverage in the state.

Where I live if you have an earthquake and it starts a fire in your house, and you don't have earthquake insurance, no dice. The root cause of the fire was the earthquake.


Yeah that's why we have to get separate EQ insurance in NorCal.

Looking at the pics from Fort Myers and other parts of FL, a lot of those houses look like cheap semi-perm trailer type houses.  None of them had tarps or hurricane protection and all laid out in rows on flat land with no drainage.  After this tear down, they should just not build back up.  Give it all back to Nature.
 
2022-10-01 4:56:08 PM  

Sydira: I know how angry i was to find out homeowners insurance didn't cover flooding...and I'm up in PA.
Those that are newer to FL and thought they were covered are especially screwed.


On the other hand, you can be sure those million dollar beach homes have cheap federal flood insurance.  Some of them have been rebuilt after more than one hurricane.
 
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