Skip to content
Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Abc.net.au)   Parks Australia desecrates an Aboriginal holy site featured in the movie "Crocodile Dundee." Aborigines sue for criminal charges, but courts rule Australia is immune from prosecution, opening up other sites for the same shiat   (abc.net.au) divider line
    More: Sad, Northern Territory, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia, Kakadu National Park, Arnhem Land, sacred site, Ranger Uranium Mine, Parks Australia  
•       •       •

2570 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Oct 2022 at 1:20 AM (9 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



56 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2022-09-30 7:33:45 PM  
Oi! Oi! We can do the fark we want, a'ight mate
 
2022-09-30 8:27:34 PM  
Keep being Asstrailia
 
2022-10-01 1:25:39 AM  
Sounds like "qualified immunity" for cops in the States.
 
2022-10-01 1:36:47 AM  
I see Native Australians are treated just like Native Americans --- like sh*t.

/sounds about white
 
2022-10-01 1:41:48 AM  
This is the kind of Trump graves: Sovereign Powe. Its the legacy of the British Constitution and the generations of Toffs that wrote to serve their own interests.
 
2022-10-01 1:46:53 AM  
I don't know much about Aussie rules, but the notion that you have laws put in place to protect federally or state owned sites from damaging development but the state, as owner of those sites, is not bound by the laws sounds like an amazing mealy mouthed lump of spotted quoll shiat.
 
2022-10-01 1:51:42 AM  
They learned it by watching us.
 
2022-10-01 1:54:26 AM  
This is outrageous.
 
2022-10-01 1:57:13 AM  
 
2022-10-01 2:06:22 AM  
TL, DR version is many parts of every country's government are not liable for actions as part of just governing.  Its a loophole that needs to be closed and the article says they are already working on it.  They will fix it.

For instance, my state has a pothole law.  The state isn't normally liable for you getting a flat tire after a snow storm because you hit a pothole.  They form when the asphalt changes temperature rapidly. The state can't be held responsible most of the time for acts of nature.  However, if the pothole is reported, the state has a time window to get it fixed and if its not fixed in that time, you can make them pay to replace your flat tire. Per the article, they forgot to give the original agency overseeing the issue any power to enforce penalties and did not waive the state's immunity from liability.
 
2022-10-01 2:15:24 AM  
SAIEW.
 
2022-10-01 2:16:56 AM  

Walker: I see Native Australians are treated just like Native Americans --- like sh*t.

/sounds about white


Actually, the aboriginal people in Austrailia are treated nothing like how we treat Native Americans. Generally, they embrace aboriginal culture and are pretty respectful and inclusive. Most people probably think aboriginal describes people with darker features and liken them to Native Americans. In reality, there typically isn't distinction made between someone who is "99%" aboriginal and very distantly removed and white in appearance.

This is a pretty uncommon ruling for Austrailia. Ayers Rock alone has entire areas that are off limits to tourists as do many other locations aboriginal people deem as holy. They are also almost exclusively hired to protect and maintain these locations. As an American, it is quite a culture shock to see the interactions. While I am sure friction exists, it certainly isn't as apparent as here in the States.
 
2022-10-01 2:26:09 AM  

Pop and Miracle Whip: See What Else they've done.


Strip mining a cave of ancient human remains is Disney movie-level antagonism.
 
2022-10-01 3:12:32 AM  

the money is in the banana stand: Walker: I see Native Australians are treated just like Native Americans --- like sh*t.

/sounds about white

Actually, the aboriginal people in Austrailia are treated nothing like how we treat Native Americans. Generally, they embrace aboriginal culture and are pretty respectful and inclusive. Most people probably think aboriginal describes people with darker features and liken them to Native Americans. In reality, there typically isn't distinction made between someone who is "99%" aboriginal and very distantly removed and white in appearance.

This is a pretty uncommon ruling for Austrailia. Ayers Rock alone has entire areas that are off limits to tourists as do many other locations aboriginal people deem as holy. They are also almost exclusively hired to protect and maintain these locations. As an American, it is quite a culture shock to see the interactions. While I am sure friction exists, it certainly isn't as apparent as here in the States.


You go to all that trouble, and then you say "Ayers Rock"?

/in my experience, Aboriginal Australians are still broadly treated like crap
 
2022-10-01 3:22:21 AM  
I initially read the headline as it being an Australian holy site because it was featured in Crocodile Dundee. Crikey, I need to go to bed.
 
2022-10-01 3:26:40 AM  

Pert: the money is in the banana stand: Walker: I see Native Australians are treated just like Native Americans --- like sh*t.

/sounds about white

Actually, the aboriginal people in Austrailia are treated nothing like how we treat Native Americans. Generally, they embrace aboriginal culture and are pretty respectful and inclusive. Most people probably think aboriginal describes people with darker features and liken them to Native Americans. In reality, there typically isn't distinction made between someone who is "99%" aboriginal and very distantly removed and white in appearance.

This is a pretty uncommon ruling for Austrailia. Ayers Rock alone has entire areas that are off limits to tourists as do many other locations aboriginal people deem as holy. They are also almost exclusively hired to protect and maintain these locations. As an American, it is quite a culture shock to see the interactions. While I am sure friction exists, it certainly isn't as apparent as here in the States.

You go to all that trouble, and then you say "Ayers Rock"?

/in my experience, Aboriginal Australians are still broadly treated like crap


To be fair, while it's been Uluṟu for a number of years, a lot of non-Australians probably haven't heard of the change, it's not like it's going to be a big news story globally, in contrast to the Kiev/Kyiv change for instance.

But yes, as said, Aboriginals still often get treated like crap in a lot of areas, and a lot of very murky history that hasn't been resolved, there are improvements generally,"acknowledgement of country" has become a regular part of most ceremonies and meetings, and the movement to bring an aboriginal voice to parliament), though whether these are substantial changes or just window dressing remains to be seen.
 
2022-10-01 3:35:23 AM  
construction of a walkway to the top pools of Kakadu's iconic Gunlom Falls, which was built too close to a sacred men's site.

Sorry, a what now?

Oh, and in re this:

the money is in the banana stand: Walker: I see Native Australians are treated just like Native Americans --- like sh*t.

/sounds about white

Actually, the aboriginal people in Austrailia are treated nothing like how we treat Native Americans. Generally, they embrace aboriginal culture and are pretty respectful and inclusive. Most people probably think aboriginal describes people with darker features and liken them to Native Americans. In reality, there typically isn't distinction made between someone who is "99%" aboriginal and very distantly removed and white in appearance.
.


You need to do some research, "mate." The brutality with which Americans treat Native Americans pales in comparison to how Australians and British handled the "Abos" as they used to call them and probably still do. As recently as the 1960s, Aboriginal land was used for above-ground nuclear testing and it was okay because there were warning signs...in English; as recently as 1983 David Bowie was threatened for bringing a "dark couple" into an all-white Outback bar to film the video for "Let's Dance." https://www.rollingstone.com/tv-movies/tv-movie-news/bowie-in-the-outback-inside-making-of-groundbreaking-lets-dance-video-182691/

Beginning as early as the 1830s and continuing into the early 1900s, there was an open policy by the British and Australian government to eradicate Aboriginals completely, to the extent that Tasmanians were completely genocided by the British before 1850 (and the current whitewash is that "there were only 2000 Aboriginal people in Tasmania at the moment of colonisation, that they had an internally dysfunctional society with no clear tribal organisation or connection to the land and were politically incapable of conducting a guerrilla war with the settlers. He argued they were more like "black bushrangers" who attacked settlers' huts for plunder and were led by "educated black terrorists" disaffected from white society. He concluded that two colonists had been killed for every Aboriginal person and there was only one massacre of Aboriginal people. He also claimed that the Aboriginal Tasmanians, by prostituting the women tribe members to sealers and stock-keepers, by catching European diseases, and through intertribal warfare, were responsible for their own demise." Wiki entry "Black War")

I know the current belief is that America is the best even at being the worst and everyone treated their natives ever so much better than we did and still do; but in reality white people globally ran roughshod over natives and killed them wherever they were and still do as often as they can get away with it; if the Australians are making a better token effort to assimilate their remnant Aboriginals good for them, but it is NOT "respectful and inclusive" except where people can see them.
 
2022-10-01 3:37:58 AM  

King Something: They learned it by watching us.


I'm going to blame it on a common British ancestry. The Canadians, Americans, and Australians all abuse the shiat out of the original inhabitants of their respective areas. Without the Brits, this wouldn't be a problem.

Of course the French or Spanish or Italians or Dutch would have gleefully stepped in to fill the void in the absence of the British, so instead of biatching about it in English iat would be in Dutch.

And let's not pretend the more expansionist East Asian countries wouldn't have tried the same.

/how do you say "it's not news, it's fark.com" in Dutch?
//humans are terrible
///it's just a question of who has the upper hand
 
2022-10-01 4:10:49 AM  

sensitive yet dangerous: King Something: They learned it by watching us.

I'm going to blame it on a common British ancestry. The Canadians, Americans, and Australians all abuse the shiat out of the original inhabitants of their respective areas. Without the Brits, this wouldn't be a problem.

Of course the French or Spanish or Italians or Dutch would have gleefully stepped in to fill the void in the absence of the British, so instead of biatching about it in English iat would be in Dutch.

And let's not pretend the more expansionist East Asian countries wouldn't have tried the same.

/how do you say "it's not news, it's fark.com" in Dutch?
//humans are terrible
///it's just a question of who has the upper hand


One of the worst genocides on record involved two Polynesian tribes. The Maori had just gotten muskets from the Portuguese (in 1820 if memory serves) and used them to terrible effect to wipe out all the members of a neighboring tribe, the Moriori, on a nearby island. No white settlers or colonists were involved, except those in the initial sale of weapons. The Maori and Moriori had been at war for generations; but getting better weapons tipped the scale to one side.

ALL humans are terrible; there are no exceptions.
 
2022-10-01 4:34:22 AM  
This apparently started out as as a request from one group that wanted a walkway to keep people from getting hurt while going to the site.  Aboriginal beliefs tend to consider getting hurt going to scared sites as bad luck, not just for the person but for others past and future depending on their tribe.  The result is a modern park walkway was built in the wrong place.

There is also the persistent problem of "they are all the same" from the governments.  Aboriginal tribes are about as uniform and constant as Germans were before 1700.  The Aboriginal tribes mostly have their home turf and areas that overlap with other tribes.  Due to very low population density, they didn't have the wars like Europe but there were tribal wars going on until very recently.  Some times the poltical disputes are a result of very long tribal feuds.

The problem of several tribes in an area is they rarely agree on things.  Uluru (Ayers Rock) was the name used by one of 3 tribes that claimed it.  They all disagree about climbing it but the largest group now has a lease and their rules win excluding the other tribes use.  One of the other groups seems to be closer related to the original inhabitants of the area from about 10,000 years ago.  Climbing it was a required rite of passage for young males and events involving promotion of Elders.  The other groups name for the rock follows a number of Aboriginal (and Pacific Islander and North American Indians) naming convention of a location's name is more about the journey getting there rather than the destination.  The British named geographical places and forced the convention on the locals.  After generations of that, the older path based names is somewhat rare.  That process also eroded a massive amount of verbal cultural history.
 
2022-10-01 4:41:15 AM  
I would like to point out that the sacred site was not destroyed (as has often been the case) just encroached upon - also that loophole will now be closed.  Seems like there is no opposition to closing it.
 
2022-10-01 4:46:01 AM  

DON.MAC: The other groups name for the rock follows a number of Aboriginal (and Pacific Islander and North American Indians) naming convention of a location's name is more about the journey getting there rather than the destination.


Singing the song to walk between distant places you have never been, but your ancestors had.  Such a cool ancient tradition.  We lost so much, every time one group came in a took over another groups lands :(
 
2022-10-01 5:02:42 AM  
"Holy" is not real. If you want my sympathy, you can't make it about superstition.
 
2022-10-01 5:09:03 AM  

Gyrfalcon: sensitive yet dangerous: King Something: They learned it by watching us.

I'm going to blame it on a common British ancestry. The Canadians, Americans, and Australians all abuse the shiat out of the original inhabitants of their respective areas. Without the Brits, this wouldn't be a problem.

Of course the French or Spanish or Italians or Dutch would have gleefully stepped in to fill the void in the absence of the British, so instead of biatching about it in English iat would be in Dutch.

And let's not pretend the more expansionist East Asian countries wouldn't have tried the same.

/how do you say "it's not news, it's fark.com" in Dutch?
//humans are terrible
///it's just a question of who has the upper hand

One of the worst genocides on record involved two Polynesian tribes. The Maori had just gotten muskets from the Portuguese (in 1820 if memory serves) and used them to terrible effect to wipe out all the members of a neighboring tribe, the Moriori, on a nearby island. No white settlers or colonists were involved, except those in the initial sale of weapons. The Maori and Moriori had been at war for generations; but getting better weapons tipped the scale to one side.

ALL humans are terrible; there are no exceptions.


My wife is Ngāpuhi, so im getting a kick out of this convo...
 
2022-10-01 6:02:35 AM  
The NT Supreme Court rules: "We stole it from you fair and square."
 
2022-10-01 6:17:35 AM  

KB202: "Holy" is not real. If you want my sympathy, you can't make it about superstition.


How about "Sacred?"
 
2022-10-01 6:20:12 AM  
Came for the whitesplaining. Didn't dissappoint.
 
2022-10-01 6:35:16 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size


Ass.
 
2022-10-01 7:45:26 AM  

NathanAllen: [Fark user image 425x180]

Ass.


Fark user imageView Full Size


/ Did, anyway - still may
 
2022-10-01 8:31:40 AM  

the money is in the banana stand: Walker: I see Native Australians are treated just like Native Americans --- like sh*t.

/sounds about white

Actually, the aboriginal people in Austrailia are treated nothing like how we treat Native Americans. Generally, they embrace aboriginal culture and are pretty respectful and inclusive. Most people probably think aboriginal describes people with darker features and liken them to Native Americans. In reality, there typically isn't distinction made between someone who is "99%" aboriginal and very distantly removed and white in appearance.

This is a pretty uncommon ruling for Austrailia. Ayers Rock alone has entire areas that are off limits to tourists as do many other locations aboriginal people deem as holy. They are also almost exclusively hired to protect and maintain these locations. As an American, it is quite a culture shock to see the interactions. While I am sure friction exists, it certainly isn't as apparent as here in the States.


They were classified as literal animals until the 1950's you ignorant slut!
 
2022-10-01 8:36:45 AM  

the money is in the banana stand: Walker: I see Native Australians are treated just like Native Americans --- like sh*t.

/sounds about white

Actually, the aboriginal people in Austrailia are treated nothing like how we treat Native Americans. Generally, they embrace aboriginal culture and are pretty respectful and inclusive. Most people probably think aboriginal describes people with darker features and liken them to Native Americans. In reality, there typically isn't distinction made between someone who is "99%" aboriginal and very distantly removed and white in appearance.

This is a pretty uncommon ruling for Austrailia. Ayers Rock alone has entire areas that are off limits to tourists as do many other locations aboriginal people deem as holy. They are also almost exclusively hired to protect and maintain these locations. As an American, it is quite a culture shock to see the interactions. While I am sure friction exists, it certainly isn't as apparent as here in the States.


Jesus H Farking Christ!

You need to read at least one history book.  The aboriginals were treated like vermin by first the British and then what became Australia.  It wasn't even illegal to kill Aboriginals until the 20th Century, then they stole their children, then they were raped with impunity.  The Australians had a policy to "fark the Black out of them" through white rape.  Today they are very much like native Americans - living in the shiattiest parts of the country and dealing with widespread alcoholism and disease.
 
2022-10-01 8:59:52 AM  

Gyrfalcon: sensitive yet dangerous: King Something: They learned it by watching us.

I'm going to blame it on a common British ancestry. The Canadians, Americans, and Australians all abuse the shiat out of the original inhabitants of their respective areas. Without the Brits, this wouldn't be a problem.

Of course the French or Spanish or Italians or Dutch would have gleefully stepped in to fill the void in the absence of the British, so instead of biatching about it in English iat would be in Dutch.

And let's not pretend the more expansionist East Asian countries wouldn't have tried the same.

/how do you say "it's not news, it's fark.com" in Dutch?
//humans are terrible
///it's just a question of who has the upper hand

One of the worst genocides on record involved two Polynesian tribes. The Maori had just gotten muskets from the Portuguese (in 1820 if memory serves) and used them to terrible effect to wipe out all the members of a neighboring tribe, the Moriori, on a nearby island. No white settlers or colonists were involved, except those in the initial sale of weapons. The Maori and Moriori had been at war for generations; but getting better weapons tipped the scale to one side.

ALL humans are terrible; there are no exceptions.


It's almost as if all power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely.
 
2022-10-01 9:01:03 AM  

I'm an excellent driver: Today they are very much like native Americans - living in the shiattiest parts of the country and dealing with widespread alcoholism and disease.


Have you ever been to both a bad American Indian reservation and a bad Aboriginal community? The Aussies ones are much worse.  The scary thing is the Aussie pay a bunch more for that not to happen yet fail worse.
 
2022-10-01 9:50:48 AM  

King Something: They learned it by watching us.


No, they've been doing it much longer.
 
2022-10-01 10:18:34 AM  

thatboyoverthere: the money is in the banana stand: Walker: I see Native Australians are treated just like Native Americans --- like sh*t.

/sounds about white

Actually, the aboriginal people in Austrailia are treated nothing like how we treat Native Americans. Generally, they embrace aboriginal culture and are pretty respectful and inclusive. Most people probably think aboriginal describes people with darker features and liken them to Native Americans. In reality, there typically isn't distinction made between someone who is "99%" aboriginal and very distantly removed and white in appearance.

This is a pretty uncommon ruling for Austrailia. Ayers Rock alone has entire areas that are off limits to tourists as do many other locations aboriginal people deem as holy. They are also almost exclusively hired to protect and maintain these locations. As an American, it is quite a culture shock to see the interactions. While I am sure friction exists, it certainly isn't as apparent as here in the States.

They were classified as literal animals until the 1950's you ignorant slut!


You can still buy coffee mugs at almost every gift shop that say "native animals" and have a black silhouette of a person playing a didgeridoo. Place is racist as can be against the natives.
 
2022-10-01 11:52:51 AM  
fark Christains, religion is stupid!  But this holy site must be protected because why?
 
2022-10-01 12:02:25 PM  

BunchaRubes: fark Christains, religion is stupid!  But this holy site must be protected because why?


Exactly. If Christians around the world were outraged because the government ran a new walkway through Golgotha Farkers would be laughing and saying that the whole hill should be bulldozed.  This isn't an ancient construction. This isn't a burial site. It isn't the location of glyphs painted 10,000 years ago.  It's a new walkway put at the site of an old path.

Fight to the death to preserve ancient history? That's a good thing.  Fight to the death to preserve the right to lands that your god told you belong to you?  You're an idiot.
 
2022-10-01 12:50:18 PM  

thatboyoverthere: the money is in the banana stand: Walker: I see Native Australians are treated just like Native Americans --- like sh*t.

/sounds about white

Actually, the aboriginal people in Austrailia are treated nothing like how we treat Native Americans. Generally, they embrace aboriginal culture and are pretty respectful and inclusive. Most people probably think aboriginal describes people with darker features and liken them to Native Americans. In reality, there typically isn't distinction made between someone who is "99%" aboriginal and very distantly removed and white in appearance.

This is a pretty uncommon ruling for Austrailia. Ayers Rock alone has entire areas that are off limits to tourists as do many other locations aboriginal people deem as holy. They are also almost exclusively hired to protect and maintain these locations. As an American, it is quite a culture shock to see the interactions. While I am sure friction exists, it certainly isn't as apparent as here in the States.

They were classified as literal animals until the 1950's you ignorant slut!


Big difference between the word "are" and "were". My statement is that there is a sharp contrast between how the US currently treats Native Americans and how Austrailia currently treats aboriginal people. The US makes no real attempts at atoning for the past, educating people on the atrocities, cultural richness, or try to better the lives of Native Americans now and in the future. Austrailia isn't perfect I am sure by any means, but at least it is trying.
 
2022-10-01 1:13:38 PM  

the money is in the banana stand: Austrailia isn't perfect I am sure by any means, but at least it is trying.


Trying to look like progress is more like it.

Many culturally sensitive groups start meetings with a "welcome to country" and "acknowledge the original custodians of the land" type stuff. The problem is that started out as a variant of a US boy scout citizenship badge requirement. Those rules required the scout to enact a play of a culture that wasn't their own and blackface was encouraged.  The fake Indian custodian of the land "prayer" is now used in Australia by nearly every council.
 
2022-10-01 2:16:12 PM  

the money is in the banana stand: thatboyoverthere: the money is in the banana stand: Walker: I see Native Australians are treated just like Native Americans --- like sh*t.

/sounds about white

Actually, the aboriginal people in Austrailia are treated nothing like how we treat Native Americans. Generally, they embrace aboriginal culture and are pretty respectful and inclusive. Most people probably think aboriginal describes people with darker features and liken them to Native Americans. In reality, there typically isn't distinction made between someone who is "99%" aboriginal and very distantly removed and white in appearance.

This is a pretty uncommon ruling for Austrailia. Ayers Rock alone has entire areas that are off limits to tourists as do many other locations aboriginal people deem as holy. They are also almost exclusively hired to protect and maintain these locations. As an American, it is quite a culture shock to see the interactions. While I am sure friction exists, it certainly isn't as apparent as here in the States.

They were classified as literal animals until the 1950's you ignorant slut!

Big difference between the word "are" and "were". My statement is that there is a sharp contrast between how the US currently treats Native Americans and how Austrailia currently treats aboriginal people. The US makes no real attempts at atoning for the past, educating people on the atrocities, cultural richness, or try to better the lives of Native Americans now and in the future. Austrailia isn't perfect I am sure by any means, but at least it is trying.


Is it really that hard to admit you were wrong?
 
2022-10-01 2:17:55 PM  

the money is in the banana stand: Big difference between the word "are" and "were". My statement is that there is a sharp contrast between how the US currently treats Native Americans and how Austrailia currently treats aboriginal people. The US makes no real attempts at atoning for the past, educating people on the atrocities, cultural richness, or try to better the lives of Native Americans now and in the future. Austrailia isn't perfect I am sure by any means, but at least it is trying.


Son, people can see you
 
2022-10-01 2:18:11 PM  

Noah_Tall: BunchaRubes: fark Christains, religion is stupid!  But this holy site must be protected because why?

Exactly. If Christians around the world were outraged because the government ran a new walkway through Golgotha Farkers would be laughing and saying that the whole hill should be bulldozed.  This isn't an ancient construction. This isn't a burial site. It isn't the location of glyphs painted 10,000 years ago.  It's a new walkway put at the site of an old path.

Fight to the death to preserve ancient history? That's a good thing.  Fight to the death to preserve the right to lands that your god told you belong to you?  You're an idiot.


Religion isn't a part of history. A bold take. Wrong but bold.
 
2022-10-01 2:21:57 PM  

thatboyoverthere: Noah_Tall: BunchaRubes: fark Christains, religion is stupid!  But this holy site must be protected because why?

Exactly. If Christians around the world were outraged because the government ran a new walkway through Golgotha Farkers would be laughing and saying that the whole hill should be bulldozed.  This isn't an ancient construction. This isn't a burial site. It isn't the location of glyphs painted 10,000 years ago.  It's a new walkway put at the site of an old path.

Fight to the death to preserve ancient history? That's a good thing.  Fight to the death to preserve the right to lands that your god told you belong to you?  You're an idiot.

Religion isn't a part of history. A bold take. Wrong but bold.


I would say nice strawman but the straw is falling out of it everywhere.  Yes the history of religion is history. But preserving some random piece of land that looks just like all the other land around it just because somebody says that their god did something cool there isn't preserving history; it's bowing to superstition in modern times.
 
2022-10-01 3:05:54 PM  
Thought this kind of legal douche baggery was only in Merica.
 
2022-10-01 3:07:32 PM  
"The long-running case centred on alleged damage caused by the construction of a walkway to the top pools of Kakadu's iconic Gunlom Falls, which was built too close to a sacred men's site."

It's a shame that those falls were built too close to the sacred men's site.
 
2022-10-01 3:59:06 PM  

thatboyoverthere: the money is in the banana stand: thatboyoverthere: the money is in the banana stand: Walker: I see Native Australians are treated just like Native Americans --- like sh*t.

/sounds about white

Actually, the aboriginal people in Austrailia are treated nothing like how we treat Native Americans. Generally, they embrace aboriginal culture and are pretty respectful and inclusive. Most people probably think aboriginal describes people with darker features and liken them to Native Americans. In reality, there typically isn't distinction made between someone who is "99%" aboriginal and very distantly removed and white in appearance.

This is a pretty uncommon ruling for Austrailia. Ayers Rock alone has entire areas that are off limits to tourists as do many other locations aboriginal people deem as holy. They are also almost exclusively hired to protect and maintain these locations. As an American, it is quite a culture shock to see the interactions. While I am sure friction exists, it certainly isn't as apparent as here in the States.

They were classified as literal animals until the 1950's you ignorant slut!

Big difference between the word "are" and "were". My statement is that there is a sharp contrast between how the US currently treats Native Americans and how Austrailia currently treats aboriginal people. The US makes no real attempts at atoning for the past, educating people on the atrocities, cultural richness, or try to better the lives of Native Americans now and in the future. Austrailia isn't perfect I am sure by any means, but at least it is trying.

Is it really that hard to admit you were wrong?


Wrong to say that by comparison Austrailia is more progressive in how it treats aboriginal people than how the US treats Native Americans? Yeah. Ok.
 
2022-10-01 4:39:13 PM  

the money is in the banana stand: thatboyoverthere: the money is in the banana stand: thatboyoverthere: the money is in the banana stand: Walker: I see Native Australians are treated just like Native Americans --- like sh*t.

/sounds about white

Actually, the aboriginal people in Austrailia are treated nothing like how we treat Native Americans. Generally, they embrace aboriginal culture and are pretty respectful and inclusive. Most people probably think aboriginal describes people with darker features and liken them to Native Americans. In reality, there typically isn't distinction made between someone who is "99%" aboriginal and very distantly removed and white in appearance.

This is a pretty uncommon ruling for Austrailia. Ayers Rock alone has entire areas that are off limits to tourists as do many other locations aboriginal people deem as holy. They are also almost exclusively hired to protect and maintain these locations. As an American, it is quite a culture shock to see the interactions. While I am sure friction exists, it certainly isn't as apparent as here in the States.

They were classified as literal animals until the 1950's you ignorant slut!

Big difference between the word "are" and "were". My statement is that there is a sharp contrast between how the US currently treats Native Americans and how Austrailia currently treats aboriginal people. The US makes no real attempts at atoning for the past, educating people on the atrocities, cultural richness, or try to better the lives of Native Americans now and in the future. Austrailia isn't perfect I am sure by any means, but at least it is trying.

Is it really that hard to admit you were wrong?

Wrong to say that by comparison Austrailia is more progressive in how it treats aboriginal people than how the US treats Native Americans? Yeah. Ok.


welcometocountry.orgView Full Size

Pictured: Progressiveness. 

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-australia-indigenous/australia-again-denounced-for-treatment-of-aborigines-as-u-n-investigates-idUSKBN16S0J7

According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, in 2016 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander prisoners accounted for over a quarter of the total prison population.


That far outranks even the US population of African Americans in prison. So fark off.
 
2022-10-01 9:41:50 PM  
thatboyoverthere:

They were classified as literal animals until the 1950's you ignorant slut!


No they weren't.  

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-03-20/fact-check-flora-and-fauna-1967-referendum/9550650
 
2022-10-01 10:50:15 PM  

Don't Troll Me Bro!: You can still buy coffee mugs at almost every gift shop that say "native animals" and have a black silhouette of a person playing a didgeridoo. Place is racist as can be against the natives.


Clearly despite me living in Australia for 55 years I have never been to a gift shop.

It is possible that there is a gift shop somewhere that sells something like this.  Tell me where it is and I will get it shut down in about five minutes of Twittering.  It would be regarded as utterly outrageous and if it wasn't shut down it would get burned down.

You are full of shiat.
 
2022-10-01 10:59:27 PM  
Fark isn't the place for nuanced discussion but anyone who thinks the situation the subject of the OP is simple and outrageous doesn't have a farking clue.

Parks Australia, particularly in Kakadu, has large numbers of aboriginal staff.  Parks Australia tends to be sensitive to indigenous feelings.  It sounds like (at worst) a mistake was made.   But someone wanted blood.

Also, these things are hard.  There is often no agreement even amongst a single indigenous group about what is and what isn't a sacred site and its boundaries.  Let alone between multiple groups. See DON.MAC's post above for more illustration.

I'm not suggesting no one did anything wrong.  But if you think this is about deliberately running roughshod over the feelings of the locals, think again.
 
Displayed 50 of 56 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking




On Twitter


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.