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(NBC News)   Florida homes downgraded to junk. As it was before, so it shall ever be   (nbcnews.com) divider line
    More: Florida, Insurance, Gulf Coast of Florida, insurance crisis, property owners, Numerous insurance companies, Florida's property insurance market, Citizens Property Insurance Corporation, recent years  
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2957 clicks; posted to Main » on 30 Sep 2022 at 4:30 AM (9 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-09-30 5:05:11 AM  
FTFA: "She encouraged Floridians to turn to Citizens Property Insurance Corporation in that instance, the state-run insurer created to be a safety valve for Florida residents."

Maybe this type of thing would work for healthcare. Someone should look into that.
 
2022-09-30 5:16:43 AM  
Don't worry, Florida homeowners...

media.tenor.comView Full Size


/It's all downhill from here
 
2022-09-30 5:29:23 AM  

CitizenReserveCorps: FTFA: "She encouraged Floridians to turn to Citizens Property Insurance Corporation in that instance, the state-run insurer created to be a safety valve for Florida residents."

Maybe this type of thing would work for healthcare. Someone should look into that.


Soshalizm in one.
 
2022-09-30 5:37:04 AM  

CitizenReserveCorps: FTFA: "She encouraged Floridians to turn to Citizens Property Insurance Corporation in that instance, the state-run insurer created to be a safety valve for Florida residents."

Maybe this type of thing would work for healthcare. Someone should look into that.


California has a similar program for earthquake insurance.

In fact, it's the only place you can buy earthquake insurance from and private insurance stopped providing earthquake coverage, after almost going bankrupt, following the aftermath of The Northridge Earthquake.
 
2022-09-30 5:42:26 AM  

JulieAzel626: CitizenReserveCorps: FTFA: "She encouraged Floridians to turn to Citizens Property Insurance Corporation in that instance, the state-run insurer created to be a safety valve for Florida residents."

Maybe this type of thing would work for healthcare. Someone should look into that.

California has a similar program for earthquake insurance.

In fact, it's the only place you can buy earthquake insurance from and private insurance stopped providing earthquake coverage, after almost going bankrupt, following the aftermath of The Northridge Earthquake.


To add:

Premiums for earthquake insurance are very high, and not many people can afford it, and there is a provision stating you may not be paid if the insurance fund runs out of money.

I imagine it's much the same with Florida's hurricane insurance program.
 
2022-09-30 5:49:01 AM  
Maybe don't build homes in:
Flood zones
Earthquake zones
Next to the sea
In the path of Typhoons/Hurricanes

You know, where bad shia-t happens often
 
2022-09-30 5:49:09 AM  

CitizenReserveCorps: FTFA: "She encouraged Floridians to turn to Citizens Property Insurance Corporation in that instance, the state-run insurer created to be a safety valve for Florida residents."

Maybe this type of thing would work for healthcare. Someone should look into that.


You can be homeless.  You can't have a serious health problem and live, so the insurers, providers, and army of digital paper pushers can and do charge absurd amounts of money.
Programs like the ACA are semi-private government programs.  So it is sort of like the Florida disaster insurance market.  It's just poorly designed, inefficient, and with hundreds of thousands of workers who move digital files from one location to another.  If only we had a machine to handle digital data, and a few words in a law to end medical debt for consumers.
 
2022-09-30 5:50:38 AM  
Fark you, subby. Florida has more important issues, like taking migrants from one state, and shipping them to Martha's Vineyard.
 
2022-09-30 6:36:02 AM  

erewhon the opinionated: Maybe don't build homes in:
Flood zones
Earthquake zones
Next to the sea
In the path of Typhoons/Hurricanes

You know, where bad shia-t happens often


Oh and for those thinking "well, that still leaves plenty of 'Murica!" remember to add:

Tornado alley
Dry upland forests in drought-prone areas
 
2022-09-30 6:47:06 AM  

skinink: Fark you, subby. Florida has more important issues, like taking migrants from one state, and shipping them to Martha's Vineyard.


And we are learning that DeSantis opposed Sandy aid while he was in Congress. fark em.
 
2022-09-30 6:48:39 AM  

CitizenReserveCorps: FTFA: "She encouraged Floridians to turn to Citizens Property Insurance Corporation in that instance, the state-run insurer created to be a safety valve for Florida residents."

Maybe this type of thing would work for healthcare. Someone should look into that.


No! That's socialism!
 
2022-09-30 7:09:29 AM  
When it isn't economical to build in Florida where will the climate refugees go?
 
2022-09-30 7:12:09 AM  
Fort myers and Cape Coral were built on a swamp.

I don't necessarily agree with New Orleans, but the city has a long history and is something that should be preserved.

Fort Myers and Cape Coral are not historical.  The small area around downtown is cool.  However the majority of the area is suburban sprawl that has continued to grow without limit.  When I moved there almost 30 years ago, the level of development was not even close to what it is today.  It didn't really start to really ramp up until the run up the housing crisis.  In 2008 my commute to work went from 45 minutes to 20 because all the construction workers and related fields got off the road.

That many people living on reclaimed swampland is dangerous and expensive, and to what end?

We need to offer buyouts to people in the most flood prone areas and condemn the land and return it to nature.  I left voluntarily because I recognized it was not sustainable to live there.  Throwing Billions down the rabbit hole to bail people out who had fair warning (Charley) that shiat could get bad in the area is not a good use of funds.  Better to buy them out and help them move further inland, or move somewhere else.
 
2022-09-30 7:12:39 AM  

JulieAzel626: and there is a provision stating you may not be paid if the insurance fund runs out of money.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-09-30 7:14:05 AM  
The law poured $2 billion into a reinsurance relief program and $150 million into a grant program for hurricane retrofitting, prohibited insurance companies from denying coverage based on the age of a roof, required insurance companies to explain denied claims and provide greater transparency, and limited attorney fees on frivolous claims and lawsuits.

I think what this will do is make it more likely that an insurance company says "F it" and leaves altogether.  Other states don't have these requirements.  Florida really needs to understand why it has to do all these machinations and other states don't.  I personally don't know the answer to this question, but they're not having an insurance crisis in other hurricane vulnerable states.
 
2022-09-30 7:17:04 AM  

JulieAzel626: CitizenReserveCorps: FTFA: "She encouraged Floridians to turn to Citizens Property Insurance Corporation in that instance, the state-run insurer created to be a safety valve for Florida residents."

Maybe this type of thing would work for healthcare. Someone should look into that.

California has a similar program for earthquake insurance.

In fact, it's the only place you can buy earthquake insurance from and private insurance stopped providing earthquake coverage, after almost going bankrupt, following the aftermath of The Northridge Earthquake.


I lived through the Northridge quake.

Now I'm in Alaska which has way more earthquakes than So Cal.
 
2022-09-30 7:21:30 AM  

zeroman987: We need to offer buyouts to people


Bull farking shiat. They built there, they deal with the consequences.
 
2022-09-30 7:24:03 AM  
Send them copies of Atlas Shrugged.
 
2022-09-30 7:32:31 AM  

zeroman987: Fort myers and Cape Coral were built on a swamp.

I don't necessarily agree with New Orleans, but the city has a long history and is something that should be preserved.

Fort Myers and Cape Coral are not historical.  The small area around downtown is cool.  However the majority of the area is suburban sprawl that has continued to grow without limit.  When I moved there almost 30 years ago, the level of development was not even close to what it is today.  It didn't really start to really ramp up until the run up the housing crisis.  In 2008 my commute to work went from 45 minutes to 20 because all the construction workers and related fields got off the road.

That many people living on reclaimed swampland is dangerous and expensive, and to what end?

We need to offer buyouts to people in the most flood prone areas and condemn the land and return it to nature.  I left voluntarily because I recognized it was not sustainable to live there.  Throwing Billions down the rabbit hole to bail people out who had fair warning (Charley) that shiat could get bad in the area is not a good use of funds.  Better to buy them out and help them move further inland, or move somewhere else.


Just a small point, but parts of NOLA like the French Quarter and the Garden District were not built on a swamp.  They were ridges up against the Mississippi where the city was originally built.  The problem New Orleans had was that as the city grew, it consumed more low lying areas.  That has somewhat right-sided as the parts most likely to flood in Katrina have become the most depopulated as the city simply has less industry to require as many residents.

Not disagreeing or anything.  I'm just saying that the city of New Orleans wasn't a bad idea from the start.
 
2022-09-30 7:49:11 AM  

dbirchall: erewhon the opinionated: Maybe don't build homes in:
Flood zones
Earthquake zones
Next to the sea
In the path of Typhoons/Hurricanes

You know, where bad shia-t happens often

Oh and for those thinking "well, that still leaves plenty of 'Murica!" remember to add:

Tornado alley
Dry upland forests in drought-prone areas


They're gonna have to evacuate a 100 mile radius around Citi Field.
 
2022-09-30 7:55:07 AM  
I love how Ron was all "hey, they have a robust $7 billion in their emergency fund and the state has $2 billion ready to go." Dude... that'll cover like 1% of claims.

They are totally f*cked because they did not deal with this problem after MULTIPLE warnings that their entire insurance market was on the brink.

No way they are able to withstand this without massive bailouts.
 
2022-09-30 7:58:16 AM  
At some point maybe congress with come to the understanding that private hazard and health insurance is not the way to run a modern country.

We need a national wind, fire, quake, mudslide insurance just like we have national flood and be done with this non sense.
 
2022-09-30 8:06:12 AM  

erewhon the opinionated: Maybe don't build homes in:
Flood zones
Earthquake zones
Next to the sea
In the path of Typhoons/Hurricanes

You know, where bad shia-t happens often


This is brilliant!

All we have to do is move every major city around the world that was originally built as a seaport or close to a river as a source of fresh water. Why didn't anyone ever think of this before?
 
2022-09-30 8:09:23 AM  
They really need better building codes in hurricane prone areas. I remember years ago this hurricane destroyed this neighborhood in Florida and the one house that survived was built to withstand hurricanes. I think it had been made of concrete, the roof was made in a way where the wind could not get under it and lift it off and it was tied down with steel cable and they had these storm shutters that were like the roll down doors at garages. I think the only damage to that house was some shingles and siding. But I am sure it isn't cheap and they just want to throw up a lot of cheap homes that cost 10X what they are worth.
 
2022-09-30 8:17:16 AM  

groppet: They really need better building codes in hurricane prone areas. I remember years ago this hurricane destroyed this neighborhood in Florida and the one house that survived was built to withstand hurricanes. I think it had been made of concrete, the roof was made in a way where the wind could not get under it and lift it off and it was tied down with steel cable and they had these storm shutters that were like the roll down doors at garages. I think the only damage to that house was some shingles and siding. But I am sure it isn't cheap and they just want to throw up a lot of cheap homes that cost 10X what they are worth.


Building codes?  Sounds like REGULATION to me!  Why do you hate capitalism and America?
 
2022-09-30 8:18:09 AM  

groppet: They really need better building codes in hurricane prone areas. I remember years ago this hurricane destroyed this neighborhood in Florida and the one house that survived was built to withstand hurricanes. I think it had been made of concrete, the roof was made in a way where the wind could not get under it and lift it off and it was tied down with steel cable and they had these storm shutters that were like the roll down doors at garages. I think the only damage to that house was some shingles and siding. But I am sure it isn't cheap and they just want to throw up a lot of cheap homes that cost 10X what they are worth.


In Florida? Good luck with that. The industries that make money doing sh*t on the cheap control that government and always have.

Only after you see the cost of this is several hundred billion is when maybe the people riot and string them up in the streets for leaving them all high and dry while they partied and stole all their money.

The federal government is going to own that whole thing because no one else will have the money to do it.
 
2022-09-30 8:21:07 AM  
d3fp6xmsakzwqg.cloudfront.netView Full Size
 
2022-09-30 8:36:37 AM  
So with everything destroyed you would think now is the perfect time to just move to a new state.

But most of them would rather die than move away because a pretty view is more important than stability and life itself
 
2022-09-30 8:37:34 AM  

dbirchall: erewhon the opinionated: Maybe don't build homes in:
Flood zones
Earthquake zones
Next to the sea
In the path of Typhoons/Hurricanes

You know, where bad shia-t happens often

Oh and for those thinking "well, that still leaves plenty of 'Murica!" remember to add:

Tornado alley
Dry upland forests in drought-prone areas


so basically the entire country. Gotcha
 
2022-09-30 8:38:33 AM  
DeSantis and his ilk have hurried Florida into Third World status. If you gave me real estate there, I'd sell it without visiting first. I used to live in Orlando, and now I tell people I wouldn't bother going to Disneyworld in the near future. Of course, Disney might not still be there in twenty years, so you gotta consider that. Ten years, probably still there, yeah.
 
2022-09-30 8:39:43 AM  

groppet: They really need better building codes in hurricane prone areas. I remember years ago this hurricane destroyed this neighborhood in Florida and the one house that survived was built to withstand hurricanes. I think it had been made of concrete, the roof was made in a way where the wind could not get under it and lift it off and it was tied down with steel cable and they had these storm shutters that were like the roll down doors at garages. I think the only damage to that house was some shingles and siding. But I am sure it isn't cheap and they just want to throw up a lot of cheap homes that cost 10X what they are worth.


The home in Florida, especially south Florida, have bee built to high wind standards for a couple of decades now. I owned two homes in the Florida Keys, I currently own a home in North Central Florida and I own a home built in East Bay California. All built in the late 90s early 2000s.

My modular house on concrete piles I had in Little Torch Key built to Cat2 wind loads, withstood 5 hurricanes while lived there including two direct hits and one direct hit since I sold it. Still there and other than some shingles no damage. My house in North Central Florida is a bomb shelter made of wood, 2x6 on 12" center exterior walls with 1/2" plywood, moisture barrier and 1/2" cypress siding ,Double pained storm rated impact windows, interior wals are 3x4" pine T&G nailed to 2x4 wall studs set at 12" on center, 2x6 T&G for roof decking instead of plywood sheet ring nailed down to 4x12" cypress roof rafters set at 3' centers, Cat4 metal roof, on 18x18" steel reinforced concrete piles auger cast into lime rock 8' down with a 30x30" steel reenforced concrete rim footer that ties them together tied to a 6" deep steel reenforced concrete slab under the house.The 4x12" rim joist is bolted down to the concrete columns with imbedded 1/2" stainless steel J bolts attaching 1/4" thick by 2" wide by 10" straps on both sides, the room rim and header are attached to every roof rafter with a 1/'8" x1 1/2" wide thick hot gal dipped strap that is nailed in with not less than 5-6 gal teco nails.  It is going nowhere.

Lets compare that to the complete joke of construction that is my most expensive property by 3x, the house we just bought last February in the East Bay area that was built in 98. It is. It has, I am not even sure what to call them, but some kind of 2 3/4" x 1 5/16" fur exterior wall stud that is 24" on center on a single 2x4 rim bolted every 36" to the 4" thick slab. The roof is 2x4 rafters set 24" on center with 1/2" OSB sheet, Exterior walls are 1/2" OSB with stucco, Nothing strapped, there is not a single window opening or door frame that is plumb or square. My guess is I am going to have wind damage if a good Santa Ana wind comes through. The entire area is developed to this bullshait standard.

The pics in places like Sanibel we saw of most of the houses still standing and still having roofs, yes many were missing shingles, were the houses built to the more recent wind code standards, it is expensive to build to, but it works.
 
2022-09-30 8:42:51 AM  

Concrete Donkey: So with everything destroyed you would think now is the perfect time to just move to a new state.

But most of them would rather die than move away because a pretty view is more important than stability and life itself


I hear Arizona is lovely this time of year. No issues with flooding there.
 
2022-09-30 8:47:12 AM  

Netrngr: dbirchall: erewhon the opinionated: Maybe don't build homes in:
Flood zones
Earthquake zones
Next to the sea
In the path of Typhoons/Hurricanes

You know, where bad shia-t happens often

Oh and for those thinking "well, that still leaves plenty of 'Murica!" remember to add:

Tornado alley
Dry upland forests in drought-prone areas

so basically the entire country. planet Gotcha


FTFY. But we still shouldn't bail these assholes out after they elected a man who voted to not help after Sandy. That's simple justice.
 
2022-09-30 8:48:43 AM  
Haters gonna hate......

i.pinimg.comView Full Size

Not all of us here in Florida are refugees from other states...

 
2022-09-30 8:49:36 AM  

Rapmaster2000: The law poured $2 billion into a reinsurance relief program and $150 million into a grant program for hurricane retrofitting, prohibited insurance companies from denying coverage based on the age of a roof, required insurance companies to explain denied claims and provide greater transparency, and limited attorney fees on frivolous claims and lawsuits.

I think what this will do is make it more likely that an insurance company says "F it" and leaves altogether.  Other states don't have these requirements.  Florida really needs to understand why it has to do all these machinations and other states don't.  I personally don't know the answer to this question, but they're not having an insurance crisis in other hurricane vulnerable states.


Insurance companies must be micro managed and buried in regulations, and frankly, they should be forced to pay for all the oversight they require.
 
2022-09-30 8:50:04 AM  
Biden should point to this, explain how it is the direct result of decades of Republican leadership, and have Democrats draft an aid bill of $1.
 
2022-09-30 9:00:18 AM  

Olthoi: Rapmaster2000: The law poured $2 billion into a reinsurance relief program and $150 million into a grant program for hurricane retrofitting, prohibited insurance companies from denying coverage based on the age of a roof, required insurance companies to explain denied claims and provide greater transparency, and limited attorney fees on frivolous claims and lawsuits.

I think what this will do is make it more likely that an insurance company says "F it" and leaves altogether.  Other states don't have these requirements.  Florida really needs to understand why it has to do all these machinations and other states don't.  I personally don't know the answer to this question, but they're not having an insurance crisis in other hurricane vulnerable states.

Insurance companies must be micro managed and buried in regulations, and frankly, they should be forced to pay for all the oversight they require.


What is the "oversight they require" and  why should they be "forced to pay" because of it?  What should they even be forced to pay for?

You can see why Florida is in such an insurance quandary.  Every Floridian expects insurance companies to just pay.  Meanwhile, the state has presented this problem to insurers:

The biggest issue right now in Florida is home insurance fraud, driven by fraudulent roofing claims. A proclamation from the office of Governor Ron DeSantis notes that, although Florida only accounts for 9% of the country's home insurance claims, it is home to 79% of the country's home insurance lawsuits. Many of these lawsuits are fraudulent.

You can micro manage them all you want, but they're already losing billions.  Micro managing won't make them manufacture money out of thin air.

According to Mark Friedlander, Director of Corporate Communications at the Insurance Information Institute, I"Florida property insurers are projected to post a cumulative underwriting loss of $1.7 billion for 2021" due to these runaway litigation costs. The governor's office reports that, for two consecutive years, net underwriting losses have exceeded $1 billion. It's no wonder that so many companies are going insolvent or leaving the state before they reach that point.

https://www.bankrate.com/insurance/homeowners-insurance/florida-homeowners-insurance-crisis/#why
 
2022-09-30 9:17:04 AM  
Maybe it's just a mentality of Florida that attracts scammers and grifters.  The state has always been subject to  get rich quick schemes.  Florida invented the housing bubble:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florida_land_boom_of_the_1920s

It's also somewhat hard to "make it" in Florida unless you already land.  Florida's economy breaks down into several categories:

1.  Retirees who earned money productively elsewhere and now fritter it away in Florida.
2.  Tourists who earned money productively elsewhere and temporarily fritter it away in Florida.
3.  Service industry workers who sling drinks at 1 and 2.  These are low paying, low value jobs.
4.  Real estate related workers who build the condos, sell condos, mow the grass, and fix the toilets.

All of the above pay less than they do in other states because if you're just going to putter around in a low-paying job, why not do it where it's warm?  This is probably why Florida attracts so many crazy people and bums.

It's also why the GDP per-capita of Florida is so low for such a populous state that is attracting residents.  Florida is 38 out of 51.  It's below Michigan even.  It's below Nevada, which is another tourist focused state that at least has mining jobs.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._states_and_territories_by_GDP

Living in Atlanta, I have worked and socialized with a ton of Floridians.  They basically come up here for work and depending on how that goes they either stay or leave.  If the best they can do is slinging drinks then they go back to Florida in their early 30s.  If they're doing something high value than they stay because they can get paid more doing that here than in Florida.  They'll possibly go back to Florida when they retire and fritter away the money they earned productively here.  One of the guys I work with just bought a condo somewhere in Broward.  When he retires in 5 years, he'll sell his house in Atlanta and move down there.
 
2022-09-30 9:33:55 AM  

groppet: They really need better building codes in hurricane prone areas. I remember years ago this hurricane destroyed this neighborhood in Florida and the one house that survived was built to withstand hurricanes. I think it had been made of concrete, the roof was made in a way where the wind could not get under it and lift it off and it was tied down with steel cable and they had these storm shutters that were like the roll down doors at garages. I think the only damage to that house was some shingles and siding. But I am sure it isn't cheap and they just want to throw up a lot of cheap homes that cost 10X what they are worth.


Building codes?
They allow trailers!!!!!!
What the hell is the use of a building code if you are going to allow houses that can just fly away?
 
2022-09-30 10:05:18 AM  
But don't they all still have access to cheap, subsidized FLOOD Insurance from the Federal Government?
From a program that was supposed to "incentivize" people into NOT building in a flood prone area?
From a fund that is like like 60-80 billion in debt?
 
2022-09-30 10:05:46 AM  
Yeah Deathsantis was too busy farkin people over on the Disney stuff, don't say gay, immigrant shipping etc to deal with this. Of course the big bad fed will bail then out and he'll get elected again because people are morans
 
2022-09-30 10:10:34 AM  

JulieAzel626: Premiums for earthquake insurance are very high, and not many people can afford it, and there is a provision stating you may not be paid if the insurance fund runs out of money.


"There was almost one million dollars in that fund. How could we know more than 50 people would be affected by that massive hurricane? Anyway, sorry, but there is nothing we can do.  Thanks for those last 20 years of premiums, but we have to drop you now that you've made a claim, even if we didn't pay out. But chin up, maybe you'll find some bootstraps in that wreckage you call a house."
 
2022-09-30 11:11:41 AM  

Someone Else's Alt: The pics in places like Sanibel we saw of most of the houses still standing and still having roofs, yes many were missing shingles, were the houses built to the more recent wind code standards, it is expensive to build to, but it works.


Isn't the long-term problem with Florida that the ocean, encouraged by climate change with its melted glaciers, rising seas and stronger hurricanes, will reclaim vast tracts of Florida because of its naturally indefensible low elevation?

As we just saw, the wind was only one part of the problem. The surge of the ocean is what will create the bigger problems for those attempting to viably live in flood-prone areas over the long term.
 
2022-09-30 11:58:35 AM  

Floki: Isn't the long-term problem with Florida that the ocean, encouraged by climate change with its melted glaciers, rising seas and stronger hurricanes, will reclaim vast tracts of Florida because of its naturally indefensible low elevation?


That's only a problem if you're in Florida, or for some reason like Florida.
Many in the other states see it as a solution to quite a few problems.
 
2022-09-30 12:13:37 PM  

CitizenReserveCorps: FTFA: "She encouraged Floridians to turn to Citizens Property Insurance Corporation in that instance, the state-run insurer created to be a safety valve for Florida residents."

Maybe this type of thing would work for healthcare. Someone should look into that.


Most states already have similar programs for health care.


Floki: Someone Else's Alt: The pics in places like Sanibel we saw of most of the houses still standing and still having roofs, yes many were missing shingles, were the houses built to the more recent wind code standards, it is expensive to build to, but it works.

Isn't the long-term problem with Florida that the ocean, encouraged by climate change with its melted glaciers, rising seas and stronger hurricanes, will reclaim vast tracts of Florida because of its naturally indefensible low elevation?

As we just saw, the wind was only one part of the problem. The surge of the ocean is what will create the bigger problems for those attempting to viably live in flood-prone areas over the long term.


Well that depends on how close you are to the shore.  Hurricanes fall apart pretty quick, but the catastrophic wind (and regular ol flooding) can, in a big storm, extend dozens of miles inland.  Storm surge only affects people right next to the shore.

Where storm surge is bad enough to do major damage is a very narrow window and often times misses heavily populated areas but if people keep moving there and keep building on the coast, eventually, any storm that hits is going to truly screw up someone somewhere almost every time.

Until we stop bailing people out and letting them get away with it, it's gonna keep happening.
 
2022-09-30 12:29:46 PM  

Floki: Someone Else's Alt: The pics in places like Sanibel we saw of most of the houses still standing and still having roofs, yes many were missing shingles, were the houses built to the more recent wind code standards, it is expensive to build to, but it works.

Isn't the long-term problem with Florida that the ocean, encouraged by climate change with its melted glaciers, rising seas and stronger hurricanes, will reclaim vast tracts of Florida because of its naturally indefensible low elevation?

As we just saw, the wind was only one part of the problem. The surge of the ocean is what will create the bigger problems for those attempting to viably live in flood-prone areas over the long term.


...And should be pointed out that you can build against wind... but you can't really build in any practical way against bad storm surge.

The ocean is very very powerful.  Stilts help with flooding (because it's just standing water, mostly) but storm surge of any meaningful amount means your house is literally in the ocean at that point.

No amount of engineering will really help with that, especially since, being very close to the ocean, you don't exactly have strong deep dirt to build into.

If bad storm surge is going to be more common, the only solution is to stop building close to shore.  That's it.  That's the one and only solution.
 
2022-09-30 12:41:55 PM  
DeSantis can just use the money to ship more migrants to blue states and cry about how they have no workers.
 
2022-09-30 12:53:57 PM  

Floki: Someone Else's Alt: The pics in places like Sanibel we saw of most of the houses still standing and still having roofs, yes many were missing shingles, were the houses built to the more recent wind code standards, it is expensive to build to, but it works.

Isn't the long-term problem with Florida that the ocean, encouraged by climate change with its melted glaciers, rising seas and stronger hurricanes, will reclaim vast tracts of Florida because of its naturally indefensible low elevation?

As we just saw, the wind was only one part of the problem. The surge of the ocean is what will create the bigger problems for those attempting to viably live in flood-prone areas over the long term.


Yep, which is why we build out houses on stilts in coastal areas (floodable zones) now.
 
2022-09-30 2:22:52 PM  
zeroman987:  We need to offer buyouts to people in the most flood prone areas

If, as a private citizen, you want to use your own money to offer buyouts to those people, then go for it.

Otherwise . . .

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-09-30 3:17:53 PM  
Yeah that's not covered...

But may be my volcano insurance will pay off.
 
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