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(Outside Online)   Ever wanted to learn how to do a pull-up? HA HA...no   (outsideonline.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Latissimus dorsi muscle, Pull-ups, Humerus, Muscle, Chin-up, entry exercises, single-arm, latissimus dorsi  
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2859 clicks; posted to Main » on 30 Sep 2022 at 1:05 AM (9 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-09-29 6:34:22 PM  
You CAN do pullups, my friend!
Youtube fO3dKSQayfg
 
2022-09-29 7:10:14 PM  
For most men under 50 with a BMI less than about 30 - even if you've spent the last 15 years on the couch indulging in your cheese-based ways - you probably have necessary raw strength to do a pull-up, it's just a physiological matter of getting your muscles to fire correctly.  I'd argue the best approach is to just go grab a bar, try to pull yourself up as much as you can, hang there for a bit and repeat a few times per day.

For most women, unless you've been working on upper body strength already, it's probably going to be a lot harder than that unfortunately.  The exercises in the article will probably help get you there, but if your gym has an assisted pull-up machine that might be the best bet.  Just don't expect instant results - it's going to be a lot of work.

In either case, being lighter will always make pullups easier.  By a lot.
 
2022-09-29 8:47:57 PM  
Aliens (1986) - Vasquez, have you ever been mistaken for a man?
Youtube Cb8bqidtzzo
 
2022-09-29 9:07:16 PM  

OptionC: For most men under 50 with a BMI less than about 30 - even if you've spent the last 15 years on the couch indulging in your cheese-based ways - you probably have necessary raw strength to do a pull-up, it's just a physiological matter of getting your muscles to fire correctly.


Man, I don't know. I started working out at 44, hired a personal trainer, had a starting BMI of 29 and it took six months of hard work before I could manage to do ONE pull-up. I'm pretty sure by that point my BMI had dropped to 25 at least. I was a proper lazy IT bastard for a few decades before that.

Push ups were difficult not because of strength, but because my shoulders were just an outright mess. It took a few months to get them flexible enough to respond at the bottom of the push. Like I'd get down to the floor and it was like someone applied an emergency brake. They just hurt like a motherfarker.
 
2022-09-29 9:26:03 PM  
I've been climbing for 16 years, and I am terrible at pullups.
 
2022-09-29 9:58:54 PM  

Jake Havechek: [Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/Cb8bqidtzzo]


Also a Cameron film


c.tenor.comView Full Size


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-09-30 1:09:15 AM  
y.yarn.coView Full Size
 
2022-09-30 1:11:03 AM  

OptionC: For most men under 50 with a BMI less than about 30 - even if you've spent the last 15 years on the couch indulging in your cheese-based ways - you probably have necessary raw strength to do a pull-up, it's just a physiological matter of getting your muscles to fire correctly.  I'd argue the best approach is to just go grab a bar, try to pull yourself up as much as you can, hang there for a bit and repeat a few times per day.

For most women, unless you've been working on upper body strength already, it's probably going to be a lot harder than that unfortunately.  The exercises in the article will probably help get you there, but if your gym has an assisted pull-up machine that might be the best bet.  Just don't expect instant results - it's going to be a lot of work.

In either case, being lighter will always make pullups easier.  By a lot.


I have to disagree. Even in my late 20s, it took considerable training to be able to do pull-ups, and I've never even been close to overweight. This article is actually spot on with respect to helpful training exercises for anyone who wants to be able to do unassisted pull-ups.
 
2022-09-30 1:15:26 AM  

The Dog Ate My Homework: OptionC: For most men under 50 with a BMI less than about 30 - even if you've spent the last 15 years on the couch indulging in your cheese-based ways - you probably have necessary raw strength to do a pull-up, it's just a physiological matter of getting your muscles to fire correctly.  I'd argue the best approach is to just go grab a bar, try to pull yourself up as much as you can, hang there for a bit and repeat a few times per day.

For most women, unless you've been working on upper body strength already, it's probably going to be a lot harder than that unfortunately.  The exercises in the article will probably help get you there, but if your gym has an assisted pull-up machine that might be the best bet.  Just don't expect instant results - it's going to be a lot of work.

In either case, being lighter will always make pullups easier.  By a lot.

I have to disagree. Even in my late 20s, it took considerable training to be able to do pull-ups, and I've never even been close to overweight. This article is actually spot on with respect to helpful training exercises for anyone who wants to be able to do unassisted pull-ups.


I noticed it was harder for lanky guys like me as opposed to shorter guys. I think it is proportionally we had more weight to pull up?
 
2022-09-30 1:19:15 AM  
When I was in my late teens, had a BMI of 8, I could do left and right single arm pull ups. Primarily because my shoulders. Now that im fat, and old, I can still do pull ups because my shoulders still work.

Pull ups are just reverse punches. Keep your arms close to your chest, and keep your movements economical.
 
2022-09-30 1:20:04 AM  
Wait. You mean you don't flail your legs wildly like you're trying to swim up the bar...?
 
2022-09-30 1:25:06 AM  
Pull-ups have been a no-go for me since I got my shoulder separated in 1982. Now even lifting my arm over my head is too much pressure on the joint capsule.

Let this be a warning to 18-year olds who think that popping noise can be ignored if it doesnt hurt too much.
 
2022-09-30 1:28:42 AM  
HERK! HOIP! HARP! HYEP!

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-09-30 1:32:23 AM  
At 50-something I can still do a few pullups. But I think it's mostly because I spent many years climbing and trained pullups. I struggle with pushups because those pushing muscles never really developed. Also anything overhead like presses or hand stands. Just not happening.
 
2022-09-30 1:33:55 AM  

Red Shirt Blues: I noticed it was harder for lanky guys like me as opposed to shorter guys. I think it is proportionally we had more weight to pull up?


It has to do with the distance between your elbows and your body.  The shorter your arms, the easier the pull-up.  Same thing with height and pushups, shorter guys have it easier.
 
2022-09-30 1:34:56 AM  

gameshowhost: HERK! HOIP! HARP! HYEP!

[Fark user image 220x292] [View Full Size image _x_]


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-09-30 1:43:15 AM  
Pull-ups have always been a struggle for me because I was born with Sprengel's deformity in my left shoulder that doesn't affect me except for not being able to do vertical motion with my shoulders (and keeping me out of the military). I can still knock out 20 pushups, but even one overhead press or pull up is a challenge.
 
2022-09-30 1:48:09 AM  
Even when I was in high school and had an off-and-on 6-pack (on if I swam a bunch in a week because it was summer or whatever, dropped to... uh, a 4-pack I guess, otherwise) and lifted weights all the time I could only do like three pull-ups.

Now? My middle-aged fat ass? Maybe one. Two or three with chin-up or whatever you call the grip when you have two parallel bars so your hands are turned sideways.

Dunno if I just never figured out the right form, or what. Can do a little more if I cheat a bit, but real ones? Nah, terrible.

... but when I was in shape I did used to be able to do just as many with my fingers over the edge of an I-beam, as with an actual bar. Which felt pretty badass. Still, I have always basically sucked at pull-ups.
 
2022-09-30 1:49:47 AM  

Red Shirt Blues: The Dog Ate My Homework: OptionC: For most men under 50 with a BMI less than about 30 - even if you've spent the last 15 years on the couch indulging in your cheese-based ways - you probably have necessary raw strength to do a pull-up, it's just a physiological matter of getting your muscles to fire correctly.  I'd argue the best approach is to just go grab a bar, try to pull yourself up as much as you can, hang there for a bit and repeat a few times per day.

For most women, unless you've been working on upper body strength already, it's probably going to be a lot harder than that unfortunately.  The exercises in the article will probably help get you there, but if your gym has an assisted pull-up machine that might be the best bet.  Just don't expect instant results - it's going to be a lot of work.

In either case, being lighter will always make pullups easier.  By a lot.

I have to disagree. Even in my late 20s, it took considerable training to be able to do pull-ups, and I've never even been close to overweight. This article is actually spot on with respect to helpful training exercises for anyone who wants to be able to do unassisted pull-ups.

I noticed it was harder for lanky guys like me as opposed to shorter guys. I think it is proportionally we had more weight to pull up?


It's really just leverage here. Short, stocky people will generally be stronger. If you are tall and lanky, you are going to have to put in more work for the same results. But....you can probably run and swim better. YMMV....
 
151 [OhFark]
2022-09-30 1:51:26 AM  
I started trying to do pullups around 7-8 years ago, age 33 or so, not really in good shape at all. Took a month of having somebody push me up by my back to be able to do one by myself. Another 3-4 months and I was consistently doing 3 sets of 15. Gotta admit, it was probably one of the most satisfying things in my life to see that consistent improvement.

That and not being able to run 1/5 of a mile (20 year smoker but had been quit about a year at the time), to 6 miles 3 times a week a few months later.

/Fat and lazy again
//Dammit wish I wouldn't have started smoking again. Tried to start running again when Covid first hit out of boredom. I did not continue after a few weeks
 
2022-09-30 2:01:22 AM  
I like just hanging there for a while and letting gravity stretch everything out. Feels good, man.
 
2022-09-30 2:04:50 AM  
Pull Pile Pull
Youtube nAWjW6p5TUg
 
2022-09-30 2:14:04 AM  
It can take a lot of work to the get the "one". But one you can do one, you can do sets or of and a few negatives until you get to two. Five sets of two for a few weeks will lead to sets of three.
Once you get to three at most exercises, everything opens up because the percentage of effort to "do one more" starts decreasing.

Like everything else it just takes consistency, discipline, and time. If it's something you want to do, almost anyone can built up to it.
 
2022-09-30 2:17:08 AM  
I know how....I just weigh too much.
 
2022-09-30 2:19:12 AM  
Step 1: pull, until you go up
Step 2: there is no step 2
 
2022-09-30 2:22:24 AM  

fallingcow: ... but when I was in shape I did used to be able to do just as many with my fingers over the edge of an I-beam, as with an actual bar. Which felt pretty badass. Still, I have always basically sucked at pull-ups.


Same here. I've tried once or twice to improve but just plateau a few reps higher and don't really have the motivation to figure out how to get past it. High reps have never really been my thing anyway. Instead, I focused on slow controlled reps, hitting my abs by lifting my legs forward, and being able use just my fingertips.
 
2022-09-30 2:30:05 AM  

FlippityFlap: Red Shirt Blues: The Dog Ate My Homework: OptionC: For most men under 50 with a BMI less than about 30 - even if you've spent the last 15 years on the couch indulging in your cheese-based ways - you probably have necessary raw strength to do a pull-up, it's just a physiological matter of getting your muscles to fire correctly.  I'd argue the best approach is to just go grab a bar, try to pull yourself up as much as you can, hang there for a bit and repeat a few times per day.

For most women, unless you've been working on upper body strength already, it's probably going to be a lot harder than that unfortunately.  The exercises in the article will probably help get you there, but if your gym has an assisted pull-up machine that might be the best bet.  Just don't expect instant results - it's going to be a lot of work.

In either case, being lighter will always make pullups easier.  By a lot.

I have to disagree. Even in my late 20s, it took considerable training to be able to do pull-ups, and I've never even been close to overweight. This article is actually spot on with respect to helpful training exercises for anyone who wants to be able to do unassisted pull-ups.

I noticed it was harder for lanky guys like me as opposed to shorter guys. I think it is proportionally we had more weight to pull up?

It's really just leverage here. Short, stocky people will generally be stronger. If you are tall and lanky, you are going to have to put in more work for the same results. But....you can probably run and swim better. YMMV....


Running not so much but yes on the swimming.
 
2022-09-30 2:32:10 AM  
Best way to be able to do a pull-up. Lose a heck ton of weight. I did that and I went from not being able to do one to being able to do one with 2 fingers and keep going until the bar was at waist height. That was fun. Gained all the weight back, but it was fun while it lasted. If I tried now I'd seriously damage my joints and ligaments. Seriously, pull-ups aren't for everyone.
 
2022-09-30 2:38:25 AM  

gameshowhost: HERK! HOIP! HARP! HYEP!

[Fark user image 220x292] [View Full Size image _x_]


Where's the second gif where that whole apparatus tips over from her weird fake pull ups?
 
2022-09-30 2:45:44 AM  
In high school I weighed 165 and could barely do one pullup and could maybe run an 8 minute mile (if you'd held a gun to my head to make me do it).

Started climbing when I was 25, now almost 10 years later I weigh 185 and can do somewhere around 20 and do 1-arm lockoffs on either arm. I wear the same clothes sizes, and this summer I got back to being able to do 20mph for half an hour on my bike.

You don't have a choice about getting older but you absolutely have a choice about getting decrepit.
 
2022-09-30 2:56:34 AM  

erik-k: In high school I weighed 165 and could barely do one pullup and could maybe run an 8 minute mile (if you'd held a gun to my head to make me do it).

Started climbing when I was 25, now almost 10 years later I weigh 185 and can do somewhere around 20 and do 1-arm lockoffs on either arm. I wear the same clothes sizes, and this summer I got back to being able to do 20mph for half an hour on my bike.

You don't have a choice about getting older but you absolutely have a choice about getting decrepit.


Tell that to the fused joints in my spine.
 
2022-09-30 3:46:15 AM  

Gyrfalcon: erik-k: In high school I weighed 165 and could barely do one pullup and could maybe run an 8 minute mile (if you'd held a gun to my head to make me do it).

Started climbing when I was 25, now almost 10 years later I weigh 185 and can do somewhere around 20 and do 1-arm lockoffs on either arm. I wear the same clothes sizes, and this summer I got back to being able to do 20mph for half an hour on my bike.

You don't have a choice about getting older but you absolutely have a choice about getting decrepit.

Tell that to the fused joints in my spine.


We all accumulate injuries or limitations as we age.  It\'s part of the process.  But these threads don't need to turn into the exercise version of "people who complain about EVs because of that one trip they take a year."

Sure you might have issues, maybe you don't have hands.  Fine, but in general, everyone can do this (and other things) if they take the time.  Most human musculoskeletal "aging" is due to lifestyle up until about 60.
 
2022-09-30 3:51:58 AM  

Incontinent_dog_and_monkey_rodeo: Red Shirt Blues: I noticed it was harder for lanky guys like me as opposed to shorter guys. I think it is proportionally we had more weight to pull up?

It has to do with the distance between your elbows and your body.  The shorter your arms, the easier the pull-up.  Same thing with height and pushups, shorter guys have it easier.


37 inch sleeve. Explains a lot.
 
2022-09-30 6:17:24 AM  

Gyrfalcon: erik-k: In high school I weighed 165 and could barely do one pullup and could maybe run an 8 minute mile (if you'd held a gun to my head to make me do it).

Started climbing when I was 25, now almost 10 years later I weigh 185 and can do somewhere around 20 and do 1-arm lockoffs on either arm. I wear the same clothes sizes, and this summer I got back to being able to do 20mph for half an hour on my bike.

You don't have a choice about getting older but you absolutely have a choice about getting decrepit.

Tell that to the fused joints in my spine.


HEY! SPINE JOINTS! MAKE DIFFERENT CHOICES!
 
2022-09-30 7:14:45 AM  
I still remember watching a documentary about a free climber, showing his training regimen. Part of which included one-handed pull-ups. Holding onto a rock outcrop. Hanging off the top of a cliff. And he looked like he could keep it up all day. It was unreal.
 
2022-09-30 7:20:37 AM  
I've always been good at pullups. I'm going to be 54 at the end of the year and can still do weighted pullups with 90 lbs. But my bench press has always sucked big time. I think maybe sometimes we are just built for certain exercises and there's not much you can do about it.
 
2022-09-30 7:23:11 AM  
Sounds like subby's got a bad fattitude holding them down. Also, a lot of fat.
 
2022-09-30 7:27:23 AM  
The last time I did pull ups was beginning of senior year in high school.  Every year, the first thing we did in PE was tests of how many sit ups, push ups, and pull ups you could do.  I sweated out 10, but I was 18 and 130lbs at the time.
 
2022-09-30 7:32:53 AM  

gameshowhost: HERK! HOIP! HARP! HYEP!

[Fark user image image 220x292]


That's the kind of thing that would make me ask her for a divorce.
 
2022-09-30 7:43:44 AM  
For the last five months or so I've been jogging to a pull-up bar on my lunch break about three times a week. Trying to work up to a muscle-up. Not really there yet.
 
2022-09-30 7:55:41 AM  
"She had man-feet..."

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-09-30 8:11:55 AM  
Pull ups??  This Marine makes them look pretty easy.

US Marine Strength Training
Youtube tx6S0KA7yPs
 
2022-09-30 8:14:43 AM  
Make it easier on yourselves.  Lose some weight.
 
2022-09-30 8:30:08 AM  

gameshowhost: HERK! HOIP! HARP! HYEP!

[Fark user image image 220x292]


And in a year or two her husband will have a new cross-fit psychopath to do that same move in the garage he gets in the divorce.

Good stuff.
 
2022-09-30 8:35:42 AM  

erik-k: In high school I weighed 165 and could barely do one pullup and could maybe run an 8 minute mile (if you'd held a gun to my head to make me do it).

Started climbing when I was 25, now almost 10 years later I weigh 185 and can do somewhere around 20 and do 1-arm lockoffs on either arm. I wear the same clothes sizes, and this summer I got back to being able to do 20mph for half an hour on my bike.

You don't have a choice about getting older but you absolutely have a choice about getting decrepit.


35 isn't old.

45 is.

My welcome to middle age was tearing a mass of intercostal muscles when lifting a tote of extension cords out of my garage attic.

The "you're old" happened the next year when I tore the cartilage for my false ribs while bracing on the attic frame and stretching to grab a different tote of holiday decorations.

At a certain age cycling, hiking, and jogging are about as demanding as your body will endure.
 
2022-09-30 8:55:43 AM  

Red Shirt Blues: The Dog Ate My Homework: OptionC: For most men under 50 with a BMI less than about 30 - even if you've spent the last 15 years on the couch indulging in your cheese-based ways - you probably have necessary raw strength to do a pull-up, it's just a physiological matter of getting your muscles to fire correctly.  I'd argue the best approach is to just go grab a bar, try to pull yourself up as much as you can, hang there for a bit and repeat a few times per day.

For most women, unless you've been working on upper body strength already, it's probably going to be a lot harder than that unfortunately.  The exercises in the article will probably help get you there, but if your gym has an assisted pull-up machine that might be the best bet.  Just don't expect instant results - it's going to be a lot of work.

In either case, being lighter will always make pullups easier.  By a lot.

I have to disagree. Even in my late 20s, it took considerable training to be able to do pull-ups, and I've never even been close to overweight. This article is actually spot on with respect to helpful training exercises for anyone who wants to be able to do unassisted pull-ups.

I noticed it was harder for lanky guys like me as opposed to shorter guys. I think it is proportionally we had more weight to pull up?


Fat guy with long ape arms...

Very hard...
 
2022-09-30 9:48:22 AM  
I didn't start playing Dungeons and Dragons because I was capable of doing one single pull-up, damnit!  Now where's my Ogre-Slaying Knife?  It's got a +9 against ogres!
 
2022-09-30 9:54:22 AM  
pfft, amateurs
upload.wikimedia.orgView Full Size
 
2022-09-30 9:56:55 AM  

NathanAllen: erik-k: In high school I weighed 165 and could barely do one pullup and could maybe run an 8 minute mile (if you'd held a gun to my head to make me do it).

Started climbing when I was 25, now almost 10 years later I weigh 185 and can do somewhere around 20 and do 1-arm lockoffs on either arm. I wear the same clothes sizes, and this summer I got back to being able to do 20mph for half an hour on my bike.

You don't have a choice about getting older but you absolutely have a choice about getting decrepit.

35 isn't old.

45 is.

My welcome to middle age was tearing a mass of intercostal muscles when lifting a tote of extension cords out of my garage attic.

The "you're old" happened the next year when I tore the cartilage for my false ribs while bracing on the attic frame and stretching to grab a different tote of holiday decorations.

At a certain age cycling, hiking, and jogging are about as demanding as your body will endure.


True, but with proper maintenance, there is no reason that needs to be 45 for most people.
 
2022-09-30 10:12:43 AM  

Red Shirt Blues: The Dog Ate My Homework: OptionC: For most men under 50 with a BMI less than about 30 - even if you've spent the last 15 years on the couch indulging in your cheese-based ways - you probably have necessary raw strength to do a pull-up, it's just a physiological matter of getting your muscles to fire correctly.  I'd argue the best approach is to just go grab a bar, try to pull yourself up as much as you can, hang there for a bit and repeat a few times per day.

For most women, unless you've been working on upper body strength already, it's probably going to be a lot harder than that unfortunately.  The exercises in the article will probably help get you there, but if your gym has an assisted pull-up machine that might be the best bet.  Just don't expect instant results - it's going to be a lot of work.

In either case, being lighter will always make pullups easier.  By a lot.

I have to disagree. Even in my late 20s, it took considerable training to be able to do pull-ups, and I've never even been close to overweight. This article is actually spot on with respect to helpful training exercises for anyone who wants to be able to do unassisted pull-ups.

I noticed it was harder for lanky guys like me as opposed to shorter guys. I think it is proportionally we had more weight to pull up?


As a few others have weighed in, for taller folks the initial problem is not that we're moving additional weight, it's that we're moving it considerably farther. Pushups/bench, squats, deadlifts, pull-ups all require considerably more work for the taller and/or longer-limbed because of the much larger distance that we've got to move to complete a single rep. Because of that, a shorter/stockier person is going to be "naturally stronger" - with the caveat that at the highest levels of competitive lifting, the fulcrum swings the other way because the taller folks have much larger frames that have allowed them to pack on way more muscle (for example: Hafthor Bjornsson, Eddie Hall, Mark Henry, Brian Shaw, etc.)

TL;DR - even if you're a tall folk, repetition is the key.
 
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