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(Twitter)   Footage of NASA's DART probe hitting asteroid Dimorphos harder than subby's probe hit your mom last night   (twitter.com) divider line
    More: Cool, shot  
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828 clicks; posted to STEM » on 27 Sep 2022 at 12:17 PM (8 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



36 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-09-27 11:29:06 AM  
Original Tweet:

 
2022-09-27 12:22:42 PM  
RIP Bruce Willis.
 
2022-09-27 12:24:48 PM  
Looking forward to the Webb and Hubble images
 
2022-09-27 12:27:59 PM  

Glorious Golden Ass: RIP Bruce Willis.


He'll always have that Christmas at Nakatomi Tower.
 
2022-09-27 12:30:29 PM  
Huh.  Looks cool, but there's no sound.

;)
 
2022-09-27 12:32:33 PM  

SecondaryControl: Huh.  Looks cool, but there's no sound.

;)


Right below the initial tweet someone added sound
https://twitter.com/AstroSky15/status/1574589625326522368
 
2022-09-27 12:34:24 PM  

SecondaryControl: Huh.  Looks cool, but there's no sound.

;)


It was about 11 million km away at impact, the sound is going to take over a year to arrive.
 
2022-09-27 12:40:54 PM  
It's interesting how the target appears slightly larger after impact. It might be the result of impact dust. But I wonder if the target was loosely aggregated enough that the impact caused it to expand slightly?
 
2022-09-27 12:41:09 PM  
When will we know if it did anything to the trajectory?
 
2022-09-27 12:48:27 PM  
Maybe I'm dumb, but I don't really understand what I'm seeing in that video. When it brightens, is that the impact? Is the asteroid one of the pretty faint dots? and what is that shockwave afterwards?
 
2022-09-27 12:53:46 PM  
c.tenor.comView Full Size
 
2022-09-27 12:57:11 PM  
The trailing LICIACube is returning images as well.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-09-27 1:00:16 PM  

The Wack: Maybe I'm dumb, but I don't really understand what I'm seeing in that video. When it brightens, is that the impact? Is the asteroid one of the pretty faint dots? and what is that shockwave afterwards?


The stationary object at the center is the target being tracked by the camera. The moving dots are background stars. DART is too small to be seen. The sudden brightening is the moment of impact. Then we see an expanding cloud of ejecta dispersing into space. The camera continues to track the target to the end of the video.
 
2022-09-27 1:00:45 PM  

KRSESQ: It's interesting how the target appears slightly larger after impact. It might be the result of impact dust. But I wonder if the target was loosely aggregated enough that the impact caused it to expand slightly?


I'm lost too. It looks to me that we are tracking the probe, the probe obliterates the asteroid like a bullet through an apple, then we keep tracking the probe.


Or vice versa.
 
2022-09-27 1:01:31 PM  
... vice versa it is then. Oops.
 
2022-09-27 1:01:36 PM  
Oh sure, NASA gets to spread Didymos all over the f'ing place while I have to wash my boat and gear after every time I go out on the water.
 
2022-09-27 1:03:39 PM  
How did it compare to, say, the fist of an angry god?
 
2022-09-27 1:07:42 PM  
Looks more like an asteroid running over a poor helpless satellite
 
2022-09-27 1:08:59 PM  

KRSESQ: The Wack: Maybe I'm dumb, but I don't really understand what I'm seeing in that video. When it brightens, is that the impact? Is the asteroid one of the pretty faint dots? and what is that shockwave afterwards?

The stationary object at the center is the target being tracked by the camera. The moving dots are background stars. DART is too small to be seen. The sudden brightening is the moment of impact. Then we see an expanding cloud of ejecta dispersing into space. The camera continues to track the target to the end of the video.


That makes sense, thank you!
 
2022-09-27 1:09:55 PM  

SecondaryControl: Huh.  Looks cool, but there's no sound.

;)


Use the music from 'Star Trek:TOS', "The Doomsday Machine".  The part where the Constellation is flying down the planet-killer's throat.
 
2022-09-27 1:13:04 PM  

RaiderFanMikeP: When will we know if it did anything to the trajectory?


In about two months.
 
2022-09-27 1:19:09 PM  
Is it me or is the asteroid and the DART going in the same direction and the DART just caught up to it?  Also, it looks like the DART didn't change the path of the asteroid.  Did I miss something?  It seems more like a Wile E Coyote thrust move to me.
 
2022-09-27 1:22:43 PM  

sid244: Is it me or is the asteroid and the DART going in the same direction and the DART just caught up to it?  Also, it looks like the DART didn't change the path of the asteroid.  Did I miss something?  It seems more like a Wile E Coyote thrust move to me.


yes. Impacting from the opposite vector would be quite a challenge. This is how most rendezvous in space work. Line up on the same orbital place and make your velocity slightly faster than the target. Though in this case it was 6km/s faster.
 
2022-09-27 1:34:43 PM  

sid244: Is it me or is the asteroid and the DART going in the same direction and the DART just caught up to it?  Also, it looks like the DART didn't change the path of the asteroid.  Did I miss something?  It seems more like a Wile E Coyote thrust move to me.


At astronomical scales even a small nudge can be the difference between being at the same place at the same time as Earth.
 
2022-09-27 1:40:41 PM  

sid244: Is it me or is the asteroid and the DART going in the same direction and the DART just caught up to it?  Also, it looks like the DART didn't change the path of the asteroid.  Did I miss something?  It seems more like a Wile E Coyote thrust move to me.


The change in velocity of the asteroid is a tiny fraction of a m/s.  We'll (Well, NASA) will observe the orbit for weeks or months to figure out how much of the energy in the collision was transferred to the asteroid's orbital velocity and path to figure out how much mass we might need to deflect a real threat to Earth.
The idea is, if it's big enough to kill us all; we'll be able to see it years in advance and 0.0001 m/s that far out still moves it hundreds of thousands of km by the time it poses a threat.
 
2022-09-27 1:42:08 PM  

khitsicker: sid244: Is it me or is the asteroid and the DART going in the same direction and the DART just caught up to it?  Also, it looks like the DART didn't change the path of the asteroid.  Did I miss something?  It seems more like a Wile E Coyote thrust move to me.

yes. Impacting from the opposite vector would be quite a challenge. This is how most rendezvous in space work. Line up on the same orbital place and make your velocity slightly faster than the target. Though in this case it was 6km/s faster.


If KSP has taught me anything, once you match relative orbital velocities, it's surprisingly easy to set a destructive collision course.
 
2022-09-27 1:44:49 PM  

freidog: sid244: Is it me or is the asteroid and the DART going in the same direction and the DART just caught up to it?  Also, it looks like the DART didn't change the path of the asteroid.  Did I miss something?  It seems more like a Wile E Coyote thrust move to me.

The change in velocity of the asteroid is a tiny fraction of a m/s.  We'll (Well, NASA) will observe the orbit for weeks or months to figure out how much of the energy in the collision was transferred to the asteroid's orbital velocity and path to figure out how much mass we might need to deflect a real threat to Earth.
The idea is, if it's big enough to kill us all; we'll be able to see it years in advance and 0.0001 m/s that far out still moves it hundreds of thousands of km by the time it poses a threat.


This is the important part...weel, this, and launching an impactor that gets there fast enough to change the path enough...well, you get the idea.
 
2022-09-27 1:48:56 PM  

sid244: Is it me or is the asteroid and the DART going in the same direction and the DART just caught up to it?  Also, it looks like the DART didn't change the path of the asteroid.  Did I miss something?  It seems more like a Wile E Coyote thrust move to me.


The asteroid, while small, is still about 5 million tons. The spacecraft has a mass of 570kg. The push is going to be tiny.

So tiny they are going to have to detect it by measuring the change in the asteroid's orbit around the larger asteroid. But as silly as that sounds, they wanted to verify a) the technology to hit a moving asteroid exists and b) how much of the force the spacecraft was capable of delivering actually influenced the asteroid.

As we saw, a lot of dust was blown clear off the asteroid. That dust carried off a chunk of the kinetic energy of the impact.
 
2022-09-27 2:08:48 PM  
Wouldn't it be ironic if this accidentally sent the asteroid on a new trajectory...... on a collision course with Earth?
 
2022-09-27 2:16:17 PM  
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2022-09-27 2:20:13 PM  

sid244: Is it me or is the asteroid and the DART going in the same direction and the DART just caught up to it?  Also, it looks like the DART didn't change the path of the asteroid.  Did I miss something?  It seems more like a Wile E Coyote thrust move to me.


The goal isn't to knock it out of orbit. The goal is to speed up (or slow down) its orbit and analyze the difference.

Think of it this way: The Earth's diameter is roughly 8000 miles at the equator (where it's fattest, since it's not entirely spherical). The Earth's velocity around the sun is about 67,000 mph or roughly 19 miles per second.

Therefore: The Earth covers its own diameter in distance every 421 seconds or roughly 7 minutes.

If an asteroid is headed directly for Earth and is 100% definitely absolutely going to hit us and it will fark up everyone's day K-T style, then we don't need to blow it out of the sky or even alter its course. We just need to speed it up or slow it down by ~7 minutes so that it arrives here too early or too late, thus harmlessly whizzing right by us like an errant football toss at a tire swing.

That's what this mission is designed to do: Evaluate whether such a strategy is feasible. I mean, the physics is pretty simple -- it's all basic f=ma kinematics, stuff you learn in Grade 11. Now we get to test and examine, and put together a plan for all potential apocalyptic space debris.
 
2022-09-27 2:36:13 PM  

Mad_Radhu: [Fark user image image 425x384]


Asteroids get revenge
 
2022-09-27 2:38:29 PM  

Spectrum: Looking forward to the Webb and Hubble images


And the companion probe. It doesn't have much power or a big antenna, but apparently it did survive the hit and is transmitting its records.
 
2022-09-27 2:48:50 PM  

sid244: Is it me or is the asteroid and the DART going in the same direction and the DART just caught up to it?  Also, it looks like the DART didn't change the path of the asteroid.  Did I miss something?  It seems more like a Wile E Coyote thrust move to me.


You missed something.
The asteroid which you're seeing is the larger one. The small one which was hiat is hard to see, and in most telescopes shows up as changes in the amount of light from the pair... but those changes are enough to be able to measure the orbital time of the small rock, and that's what they'll be watching for the next couple of months.
 
2022-09-27 4:07:31 PM  

WelldeadLink: sid244: Is it me or is the asteroid and the DART going in the same direction and the DART just caught up to it?  Also, it looks like the DART didn't change the path of the asteroid.  Did I miss something?  It seems more like a Wile E Coyote thrust move to me.

You missed something.
The asteroid which you're seeing is the larger one. The small one which was hiat is hard to see, and in most telescopes shows up as changes in the amount of light from the pair... but those changes are enough to be able to measure the orbital time of the small rock, and that's what they'll be watching for the next couple of months.


Yep - NASA hit the asteroid's moonlet, not the asteroid.
 
2022-09-27 6:45:51 PM  

Ishkur: sid244: Is it me or is the asteroid and the DART going in the same direction and the DART just caught up to it?  Also, it looks like the DART didn't change the path of the asteroid.  Did I miss something?  It seems more like a Wile E Coyote thrust move to me.

The goal isn't to knock it out of orbit. The goal is to speed up (or slow down) its orbit and analyze the difference.

Think of it this way: The Earth's diameter is roughly 8000 miles at the equator (where it's fattest, since it's not entirely spherical). The Earth's velocity around the sun is about 67,000 mph or roughly 19 miles per second.

Therefore: The Earth covers its own diameter in distance every 421 seconds or roughly 7 minutes.

If an asteroid is headed directly for Earth and is 100% definitely absolutely going to hit us and it will fark up everyone's day K-T style, then we don't need to blow it out of the sky or even alter its course. We just need to speed it up or slow it down by ~7 minutes so that it arrives here too early or too late, thus harmlessly whizzing right by us like an errant football toss at a tire swing.

That's what this mission is designed to do: Evaluate whether such a strategy is feasible. I mean, the physics is pretty simple -- it's all basic f=ma kinematics, stuff you learn in Grade 11. Now we get to test and examine, and put together a plan for all potential apocalyptic space debris.


This is exactly it. And in the scenario you described it makes it super easy to calculate how many rockets loaded with Elon Musk's Tesla Roadster concrete we need. Every nation/company that can launch a thing could/would contribute and slow it down by 7 minutes.
 
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