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(Big Think)   NASA's DART mission is making its big asteroid impact today. Here's what makes asteroid redirection such a challenge   (bigthink.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Asteroid, Solar System, Near-Earth object, Earth, Jupiter, asteroid Dimorphos, NASA's DART mission, Tunguska-like event  
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589 clicks; posted to STEM » on 26 Sep 2022 at 10:34 AM (18 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-09-26 11:04:06 AM  
3 votes:
The results of this might be really interesting- OSIRIS-REX found out that the asteroid Bennu really isn't a solid.  When they went in for the sample the gas puff that was supposed to gather up the sample blew a ~8 meter crater into the thing.  The probe sank 30cm into the surface and it would have kept going into the asteroid if the spacecraft hadn't reversed course.

It basically acted like a liquid made of small rocks- if Didimoon is similar the probe is going to make a huge mess.
 
2022-09-26 12:02:47 PM  
2 votes:
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2022-09-26 12:09:41 PM  
2 votes:
The biggest challenges of redirecting a dangerous asteroid is grounded in time and basic physics.  By the time we know we're on a collision course with one of these things, we don't have enough time or big enough things to hit them with to meaningfully impact their trajectory.
 
2022-09-26 10:56:09 AM  
1 vote:

KRSESQ: I wonder how certain they are that their experiment doesn't inadvertently put the target on an inevitable collision course with Earth?

/yeah, I know, big asteroid, tiny impactor, absurdly minute deviation
//butterfly effect, anyone?


100%, to lots of decimal places and over any relevant timescale.
 
2022-09-26 11:31:03 AM  
1 vote:

Chief Superintendent Lookout: a nuke to split the asteroid


Funny, but I thought nukes are an option to redirect an asteroid? Not by breaking it up, but by detonating it to deflect it if we do this long enough in advance. A nuclear weapon is a huge amount of energy we could use to alter the course of an asteroid.
 
2022-09-26 12:21:43 PM  
1 vote:

Chief Superintendent Lookout: mrmopar5287: Chief Superintendent Lookout: a nuke to split the asteroid

Funny, but I thought nukes are an option to redirect an asteroid? Not by breaking it up, but by detonating it to deflect it if we do this long enough in advance. A nuclear weapon is a huge amount of energy we could use to alter the course of an asteroid.

https://m.imdb.com/title/tt0120591/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0


I'm aware of the movie. I'm saying the movie is stupid but nuking an asteroid might not be.
 
2022-09-26 12:38:17 PM  
1 vote:

A Cave Geek: mrmopar5287: Chief Superintendent Lookout: mrmopar5287: Chief Superintendent Lookout: a nuke to split the asteroid

Funny, but I thought nukes are an option to redirect an asteroid? Not by breaking it up, but by detonating it to deflect it if we do this long enough in advance. A nuclear weapon is a huge amount of energy we could use to alter the course of an asteroid.

https://m.imdb.com/title/tt0120591/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0

I'm aware of the movie. I'm saying the movie is stupid but nuking an asteroid might not be.

Yeah, it kind of is.  All you do is create more falling objects, all of which will now be radioactive. AND you still don't get any significant change in direction.


If you could split an asteroid into two large chunks you might arrange for both of them to miss us even as the calculated center of mass went through our planet (cue the joke about the three statisticians hunting a rabbit). Very unlikely that everything would line up just right for this to be an option though. And the detonation would have to happen long before it was anywhere near the planet. 

The normal strategy for nuking an asteroid is to detonate near the surface to blow off a small amount of material and push the remainder onto a different path.
 
2022-09-26 12:44:41 PM  
1 vote:

A Cave Geek: mrmopar5287: Chief Superintendent Lookout: mrmopar5287: Chief Superintendent Lookout: a nuke to split the asteroid

Funny, but I thought nukes are an option to redirect an asteroid? Not by breaking it up, but by detonating it to deflect it if we do this long enough in advance. A nuclear weapon is a huge amount of energy we could use to alter the course of an asteroid.

https://m.imdb.com/title/tt0120591/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0

I'm aware of the movie. I'm saying the movie is stupid but nuking an asteroid might not be.

Yeah, it kind of is.  All you do is create more falling objects, all of which will now be radioactive. AND you still don't get any significant change in direction.


If an asteroid gets broken up into small enough pieces most of the mass will burn up in our atmosphere.

The downside is risk of having multiple smaller (but still nuclear-bomb-level) impacts.
 
2022-09-26 12:53:10 PM  
1 vote:

krispos42: A Cave Geek: mrmopar5287: Chief Superintendent Lookout: mrmopar5287: Chief Superintendent Lookout: a nuke to split the asteroid

Funny, but I thought nukes are an option to redirect an asteroid? Not by breaking it up, but by detonating it to deflect it if we do this long enough in advance. A nuclear weapon is a huge amount of energy we could use to alter the course of an asteroid.

https://m.imdb.com/title/tt0120591/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0

I'm aware of the movie. I'm saying the movie is stupid but nuking an asteroid might not be.

Yeah, it kind of is.  All you do is create more falling objects, all of which will now be radioactive. AND you still don't get any significant change in direction.

If an asteroid gets broken up into small enough pieces most of the mass will burn up in our atmosphere.

The downside is risk of having multiple smaller (but still nuclear-bomb-level) impacts.


So its good to boil the atmosphere and oceans instead of taking a shot to the face?

Or do you really believe thermal energy magically vanishes into the abyss with a storm of micro impact events?
 
2022-09-26 12:55:18 PM  
1 vote:

krispos42: A Cave Geek: mrmopar5287: Chief Superintendent Lookout: mrmopar5287: Chief Superintendent Lookout: a nuke to split the asteroid

Funny, but I thought nukes are an option to redirect an asteroid? Not by breaking it up, but by detonating it to deflect it if we do this long enough in advance. A nuclear weapon is a huge amount of energy we could use to alter the course of an asteroid.

https://m.imdb.com/title/tt0120591/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0

I'm aware of the movie. I'm saying the movie is stupid but nuking an asteroid might not be.

Yeah, it kind of is.  All you do is create more falling objects, all of which will now be radioactive. AND you still don't get any significant change in direction.

If an asteroid gets broken up into small enough pieces most of the mass will burn up in our atmosphere.

The downside is risk of having multiple smaller (but still nuclear-bomb-level) impacts.


Having that much of the atmosphere heated up with that much energy is a bad thing regardless of how many solid chunks make it through to ground level.
 
2022-09-26 1:11:17 PM  
1 vote:

A Cave Geek: The biggest challenges of redirecting a dangerous asteroid is grounded in time and basic physics.  By the time we know we're on a collision course with one of these things, we don't have enough time or big enough things to hit them with to meaningfully impact their trajectory.


Depends on how early we see it, which is why detection is planetary defense priority #1.
 
2022-09-26 7:42:22 PM  
1 vote:
The last images were incredible.
 
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