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448 clicks; posted to Main » and Discussion » on 25 Sep 2022 at 9:00 AM (10 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-09-25 7:15:43 AM  
About 10 or 15 years ago I 2allwas working on Virginia's Eastern Shore and, as I was leaving, saw a nursery. I stopped and they had passionflowers l. I never knew they would grow here* and bought a couple. One didn't survive but the passiflora edulisdid and lived about 10 years, covering the back corner of the fence on e when the mild winter did not kill it off. It seldom bore fruit but it had beautiful flowers that smelled wonderful. After it failed to return one year, i bought one from a mail order nursery, put it out front and was quite pleased to discover that it fruited. They are delicious, leading me to grow them as a hobby. They did not do well this year, they fruited late and the fruit isn't ripening, but I am hopeful for next year.

*Fredericksburg, Va.
 
2022-09-25 8:26:33 AM  
That day when one of our cucumbers decided to break through and boldly put himself on display.
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2022-09-25 8:26:55 AM  
My wife kills ferns
My kids killed a plant that was older than me, and inherited from my dad

I water garden,
 
2022-09-25 9:02:32 AM  
About two years back I grew pumpkins. 
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Very proud of those. Will try again next year.
 
2022-09-25 9:07:16 AM  
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2022-09-25 9:09:21 AM  

eclecticman666: [Fark user image image 425x318]


My wife wanted a swing to enjoy our neighbors new pound. Things got out of hand.
Three 2 person swings face each other.
 
2022-09-25 9:14:37 AM  

eclecticman666: My wife wanted a swing to enjoy our neighbors new pound. Things got out of hand.


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2022-09-25 9:14:48 AM  
I grew this Japanese willow and it died after I put this wall in.
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2022-09-25 9:15:38 AM  
Many moons ago I had a friend that had this indoor garden. He also liked to travel a lot so when he was out of town I would tend to his garden. He had a lot of plants, around 175, in various states of growth. Many small isles to go down to water them all.

With so many plants and having to refill the jug a few times it was difficult to keep track of which have already been watered. One day I missed a row and when I came in the next  day they were all droopy. Just a stem sticking out of the dirt with all the branches at their sides.

I f*cking freaked out! That would have been a lot of lost income and my friend might not be able to go to France for a third time that year to visit his girlfriend. Yes, he was in France to visit his girlfriend. I did meet her once, she was very pretty and nice.

But they were pretty hardy plants and a few hours after I watered them they perked right back up.


/heh heh heh, they don't suspect a thing *rubs hands*
 
2022-09-25 9:17:42 AM  
As I was approaching my teens, my parents decided they wanted an organic garden.  It was a pain in the ass to get going, but when it did, we often had years when we had the good problem of more than a bountiful harvest. Then came the blueberry bushes. They eventually became so productive that our neighbors knew they could come pick a bucket pretty much whenever they wanted.
 
2022-09-25 9:17:48 AM  
I guess my most exciting introduction this summer was this hibiscus, Starry Starry Night 
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2022-09-25 9:20:39 AM  

usahole: I guess my most exciting introduction this summer was this hibiscus, Starry Starry Night [Fark user image image 425x566]


Is that a Rosanna geranium?
 
2022-09-25 9:22:48 AM  
I bought a really nice purple and green vine from the market ten years ago. It hung on the front porch all summer and thrived.  I moved it inside for the northern Midwest winter and it slowly became the most emaciated pathetic looking plant ever.  Completely thinned and mostly dead.  A quick Google explained how to take cuttings and propagate it. I followed suit and tossed the unused trimmings off the balcony.
Fast forward 6 months. I'm packing things up to move and the plant looks acceptable but no where near healthy.  As I'm doing a walk around of the yard I noticed my trimmings I tossed from the balcony had rooted directly under the dryer exhaust vent and where thriving to the point they looked like I just brought them home from the market.
 
2022-09-25 9:23:31 AM  

KingKauff: As I was approaching my teens, my parents decided they wanted an organic garden.  It was a pain in the ass to get going, but when it did, we often had years when we had the good problem of more than a bountiful harvest. Then came the blueberry bushes. They eventually became so productive that our neighbors knew they could come pick a bucket pretty much whenever they wanted.


The birds pick my blueberries clean and I check 2-3 times a day.  I'd have to pick them before they ripen to get any from about 10 bushes that are currently producing.  I built a huge 10 by 30 cage over them and they found ways to get in and couldn't get out again, so they stayed in there and ate until I opened the door and chased them out.  I got berries though.  Then a storm knocked a huge tree onto it and crushed it.  Now they are totally exposed.
 
2022-09-25 9:24:44 AM  
Tried to grow fruit trees...apple, plum Montmorency cherries.
They were rated for the zone I'm in, but they apparently weren't informed of this.
 
2022-09-25 9:25:19 AM  
I grew this jade tree from a single leaf I got from the therapy place I was going to in 2010. When I asked if I could take one the counselor told me it wouldn't work.

This is it at four years old. Never knew they flowered.

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2022-09-25 9:30:24 AM  

eclecticman666: usahole: I guess my most exciting introduction this summer was this hibiscus, Starry Starry Night [Fark user image image 425x566]

Is that a Rosanna geranium?


Rozanne, yes - pretty amazing. I've got a half dozen and they completely cover an area about 6x10 feet, blooming from May 'til frost.
 
2022-09-25 9:30:29 AM  
My mom killed fake flowers. It got dusty, so she decided to clean it a little. It fell apart. Live plants were even worse. Except African violets, those did well.

I inherited her brown thumb. I killed a peace lily, somehow. I don't even keep fake arrangements around.
 
2022-09-25 9:36:49 AM  
Living in MN, I've learned to plant short season varieties and watch for frost.

Years ago, the first year we had our house, we roto-tilled a small garden out back. Average frost-out is around May 10, so we waited to plant our sweet corn until mid-month, thinking that by the time it sprouted, it would be well past the risk.

The 2nd half of May was quite warm and by Memorial Day we had a nice bed of sprouts. A few days later, on June 1, there was a hard frost. IIRC, they didn't predict low temps in Mpls to dip below 40 and the TV weather people had said nothing of frost anywhere in the region. But in the north suburbs where we live, it (obviously) got colder. And it went well below 40 in the city.

We went out back and found our entire corn crop wilted and dead. In farking June!

Now, any time we hear a forecast of temps dropping within 10 degrees of freezing we cover non-hardy plants, just in case.

Lesson learned.
 
2022-09-25 9:41:08 AM  

Halfabee64: KingKauff: As I was approaching my teens, my parents decided they wanted an organic garden.  It was a pain in the ass to get going, but when it did, we often had years when we had the good problem of more than a bountiful harvest. Then came the blueberry bushes. They eventually became so productive that our neighbors knew they could come pick a bucket pretty much whenever they wanted.

The birds pick my blueberries clean and I check 2-3 times a day.  I'd have to pick them before they ripen to get any from about 10 bushes that are currently producing.  I built a huge 10 by 30 cage over them and they found ways to get in and couldn't get out again, so they stayed in there and ate until I opened the door and chased them out.  I got berries though.  Then a storm knocked a huge tree onto it and crushed it.  Now they are totally exposed.


We used netting. Worked fairly well.
 
2022-09-25 9:50:18 AM  

usahole: eclecticman666: usahole: I guess my most exciting introduction this summer was this hibiscus, Starry Starry Night [Fark user image image 425x566]

Is that a Rosanna geranium?

Rozanne, yes - pretty amazing. I've got a half dozen and they completely cover an area about 6x10 feet, blooming from May 'til frost.


I couldn't remember the exact name, thanks. I bought two years ago, still do well.
 
2022-09-25 9:52:52 AM  
I grew a bunch of ginkgos from seed. I lost a couple one winter when I didn't keep the pots wet enough in the garage but the four survivors are in my yard.
I had better luck with dwarf peach trees a friend of mine gave me. I have five in the yard and hopefully the two big ones will fruit next year. The deer are the biggest pest but this year I had to fight a leaf must.
Climate change is fun. We're getting really wet spells. Too wet for many plants to be happy.
 
2022-09-25 10:01:38 AM  
My wife has a green thumb. I have the Thumb of Death. I love the look of Bonsai trees, and on a whim bought one. It died. Tried again. It died. My wife bought one for me. It died. My daughter bough one for me. It died. I got one from my sister-in-law. So for it's doing okay.
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2022-09-25 10:03:31 AM  
I had some cool vines out front. They got decimated by a late hard freeze.
I put some of the bigger ones to use in the front legs of this table.
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2022-09-25 10:07:46 AM  
Pretty brown thumb here although I've managed to find a few plants that I get along with like Japanese cut leaf maples.

Planted a raspberry bush last year in front of my electric meter and it's doing far better than I thought it would ever do.  But it helped more than that- I was picking stuff one afternoon when I was suddenly surrounded by wasps.  Damn things had made a nest behind the meter using a hole where the wires went thorough the siding.  Really fast- there had been almost no activity two days before when I was picking and suddenly boom- active colony.

I probably wouldn't have noticed for a lot longer if I hadn't planted the raspberry bush and they might have done real damage.  It's been a good plant.  Got probably 2 quarts of berries and while I should prune it back there's still half a dozen ripe ones every day.
 
2022-09-25 10:17:06 AM  
When I was a little kid, I grew a corn plant.  I marveled at it often, especially when it grew an ear.  I waited expectantly to harvest it, shuck it, and eat it.  They day finally came.  I remember it like it was yesterday even though it was over fifty years ago.

The kernels were non-existent.  It was never pollinated.  My parents probably knew.  Even if there were kernels, it still would have been inedible.  It was feed corn.

"When the student is ready the teacher will appear."  They explained the process to me.
 
2022-09-25 10:22:02 AM  
I never liked gardening.  I associated it with work, with being outside on hot Nevada summers and pulling weeds that grew and grew and grew, an endless and ultimately pointless task.  I associated it with my mother, who never seemed to tire of this activity.  Of pathetic corn husks and strawberries eaten by rabbits, tomatoes half-rotted on the vine.  All this work, and for what?  How futile, how often fruitless.  How pointless.

Then my wife and I moved to Oregon three years ago and bought a home.  This area of the Pacific Northwest used to be thick with orchards.  Most of them are gone now, replaced by marijuana farms, that new green gold rush that stinks like skunk when you drive down the road with your windows down.  But I digress.

The house we bought two years ago has apple trees, and a pretty big back yard.  Great, I thought.  More maintenance.  More things to waste my weekend on.  And those flower beds; my wife will plant something but expect me to maintain it.  How obnoxious.  But I love her so I guess I'll do it.  So I bought some new gardening gloves and a wide brimmed hat to protect me from the sun and got to work.

At first I cut the grass with a bad attitude.  This is so dumb, why even waste time and water on grass, we're in a historic drought, God it's hot, I wish I were inside in the AC.  But there's alot to be said for finishing a task with tangible gains; my lawn was previously unkempt and now it looks good.  Not great, but pretty good.  And sure, I have a sweat going, but it's a good honest sweat.  I feel clean, even though I'm actually quite dirty.  And when you see the love of your life playing on that selfsame grass with your dogs, it stirs a feeling.  A quiet pride.  A love.

Of course, simply running a mower alone just won't do.  So I dig out the unsightly weeds, I do the edging so my lines are clean.  Hell, I even make compost, because it would be a shame if those flowerbeds remained empty, so I plant native wildflowers for the bees and milkweed for the Monarch butterflies.  And I see those bees a-buzzing and those butterflies a-Monarching and there's that feeling again.  That quiet pride.  That love.

And those apple trees.  Remember them?  After I redid the sprinklers and the water system, they not only produced fruit but they flourished.  And now I have to check them once a week this time of year to pick the ones that are ready, though to be sure the birds and the bugs eat their fair share.

Now I have all these apples; what's a man gonna do with dozens of pounds of apples?  So I make pies, about two or three a week, and hand them out to my neighbors.  I walk up to their doors and knock and say hey there, it's your neighbor, my apple trees are going crazy this year, we have just too many apples for just my wife and I, so I made you a pie.  Yep, homemade from scratch.  Nope, you don't have to worry about returning the tin anytime soon; I've got plenty.  And you see the looks on their faces, the happiness and the smiles, and they tell you thanks and there's that warm feeling.  That quiet pride.  That love.

And the next time you are putzing around in your garden, the neighbors from across the street come over and say hi.  You open the gate in the fence and they make comments that essentially boil down to "the work you've done out here has paid dividends.  It's been worth it." And there is that feeling again.

And you become closer with your neighbors, how could you not, and they invite you over for dinner and you invite them in turn.  And soon you're having people over to just hang out in your garden, sipping drinks in the shade as someone's grandkids chase butterflies.  When you go down to the garden store, you find it's no longer grumpiness in your heart and the threat of a pissed off spouse that is your primary motivation.  It's some other feeling entirely.  Some quiet and something lovely.

I get it now mom.  I totally get it.
 
2022-09-25 10:22:31 AM  

eclecticman666: eclecticman666: [Fark user image image 425x318]

My wife wanted a swing to enjoy our neighbors new pound. Things got out of hand.
Three 2 person swings face each other.


So is she watching pond dogs or pound fish?
 
2022-09-25 10:26:06 AM  
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My local nursery yesterday...
Got more sunflowers, a Four o'clock, and salvia Victoria for the hummingbirds.
 
2022-09-25 10:27:11 AM  
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2022-09-25 10:30:11 AM  
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Sunflowers for Ukraine.
And the monarch butterflies.
 
2022-09-25 10:34:19 AM  
This year I planted a bunch of ground hog deterrent squash to keep them out of my main garden. Unfortunately, I did it at the end of the day with heat stroke so I planted way way more than I should have. The Japanese black futsu have taken over the flower bed. The leaves are over a fort across. In the picture below wire fence in the back is 5 feet tall and the bush with the fading red flowers is monarda and about 3 feet tall. The whole thing is about ten feet of squash plant tangle.

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I already have 1/2 a bushel of acorn, a few 5+lb butternut, and a dozen white mashed potato squashes. There are at least a dozen more of each and 2 dozen Futsu.

The groundhog? He disappeared mid July.
 
2022-09-25 10:35:39 AM  

Man_Without_A_Hat: I never liked gardening.  I associated it with work, with being outside on hot Nevada summers and pulling weeds that grew and grew and grew, an endless and ultimately pointless task.  I associated it with my mother, who never seemed to tire of this activity.  Of pathetic corn husks and strawberries eaten by rabbits, tomatoes half-rotted on the vine.  All this work, and for what?  How futile, how often fruitless.  How pointless.

Then my wife and I moved to Oregon three years ago and bought a home.  This area of the Pacific Northwest used to be thick with orchards.  Most of them are gone now, replaced by marijuana farms, that new green gold rush that stinks like skunk when you drive down the road with your windows down.  But I digress.

The house we bought two years ago has apple trees, and a pretty big back yard.  Great, I thought.  More maintenance.  More things to waste my weekend on.  And those flower beds; my wife will plant something but expect me to maintain it.  How obnoxious.  But I love her so I guess I'll do it.  So I bought some new gardening gloves and a wide brimmed hat to protect me from the sun and got to work.

At first I cut the grass with a bad attitude.  This is so dumb, why even waste time and water on grass, we're in a historic drought, God it's hot, I wish I were inside in the AC.  But there's alot to be said for finishing a task with tangible gains; my lawn was previously unkempt and now it looks good.  Not great, but pretty good.  And sure, I have a sweat going, but it's a good honest sweat.  I feel clean, even though I'm actually quite dirty.  And when you see the love of your life playing on that selfsame grass with your dogs, it stirs a feeling.  A quiet pride.  A love.

Of course, simply running a mower alone just won't do.  So I dig out the unsightly weeds, I do the edging so my lines are clean.  Hell, I even make compost, because it would be a shame if those flowerbeds remained empty, so I plant native wildflowers for the bees and milkw ...


Damn, your mother is smart.  Great story.  Thanks for brightening my morning.
 
2022-09-25 10:46:53 AM  
My wife presented me with a Bonsai kit. After trying to germinate 100 seeds
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since January I ended up with this.....
 
2022-09-25 10:48:45 AM  

usahole: I guess my most exciting introduction this summer was this hibiscus, Starry Starry Night [Fark user image 425x566]


Be very patient next spring. I did a fall planting of a hibiscus in September 2021 "Luna Red". I thought I had it well mulched under a thick blanket of oak leaves. This spring, nothing. You don't cut back last year's growth until this year's emerges so I had these ugly dead sticks. I decided I killed it and ordered another (Starry, Starry Night funny enough) the day before I got my new plant, the old one emerged. I think it was something like the first week of June (Zone 5a). I gave the new one to a neighbor and had this by August:

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This week I am going to plant some spring bulbs around it (anemones and snowdrops) so I get some spring color while I wait for the hibiscus to emerge.
 
2022-09-25 11:07:53 AM  
I started a mango tree from a seed. I put it in a pot and it grew to about 4" tall. I put it outside to get some sun and my beagle ate it, roots and all.

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2022-09-25 11:08:56 AM  
My Mom was an avid gardener. When I was a little kid I liked picking wood violets from wherever I found them and lily of the valley from the place they grew on the other side of the garage. We had a garden space that ran the length of the white picket fence between our yard and the neighbor that was maybe 3 foot wide. There was a gap where the gate was, then a big elm tree, then the last 4 feet of the garden. Mom told me I could have that space if I wanted to transplant violets and have my own garden. She tilled and fertilized it, then I was on my own. I hunted and transplanted violets all spring. They are non-protected wildflowers here in Wisconsin so that was not an issue. Next spring, I got these huge leaves and blossoms the size of silver dollars. The typical wood violet is about nickel size.

My first ever garden was a success!! For 4 years we had small vases of violets and Lily of the Valley on the kitchen windowsill every spring until we moved. Mom planted gardens in the new house but I was in HS and not interested. I was able to have a garden in my Boobies-college home but I moved from there after 3 years and it wasn't until the last 5 years that I have been able to garden again.

Stock image of a wood violet:
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2022-09-25 11:19:31 AM  

catmandu: I was able to have a garden in my Boobies-college home


Fark filters are sometimes silly. I assume it filters the same words for #1 after-college assuming it is a newbie.
 
2022-09-25 11:36:40 AM  

catmandu: catmandu: I was able to have a garden in my Boobies-college home

Fark filters are sometimes silly. I assume it filters the same words for #1 after-college assuming it is a newbie.


You can blame farkers adjudicating that they have the post of the first persuasion.
 
2022-09-25 11:45:12 AM  

hoodiowithtudio: catmandu: catmandu: I was able to have a garden in my Boobies-college home

Fark filters are sometimes silly. I assume it filters the same words for #1 after-college assuming it is a newbie.

You can blame farkers adjudicating that they have the post of the first persuasion.


That is what I guessed. Didn't even think about it until I read boobies
 
2022-09-25 11:49:19 AM  
We hit a U-Pick grape place Saturday. Bought about 15 lbs of grapes, a Himrod and a Thomcord vine.  So, today we will plant the new vines and I'll be making some jam. Still trying to figure out the grape supports. My wife wants an arbor with really wide supports for the vines, but we just don't have the room between the hazelnuts and the blueberries.
 
2022-09-25 11:57:27 AM  
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10 years ago , I went into a local farm supply store and they had one of these pepper plants in a pot on the counter.
I asked and got permission to take a pepper for seed.
Every year since, I have grown dozens of these plants, all descendants from that single pepper. I have sold a few at the local flea market, but I've given away hundreds.
The first year I just called them jelly bean peppers , but after some research I now know they are Bolivian Rainbows.
Easy to grow , very hot,  I've even had luck keeping them inside over the winter.
 
2022-09-25 12:05:47 PM  
My pumpkins did not do well. Got lots of gourds, though.

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2022-09-25 12:23:46 PM  

Man_Without_A_Hat: I never liked gardening.  I associated it with work, with being outside on hot Nevada summers and pulling weeds that grew and grew and grew, an endless and ultimately pointless task.  I associated it with my mother, who never seemed to tire of this activity.  Of pathetic corn husks and strawberries eaten by rabbits, tomatoes half-rotted on the vine.  All this work, and for what?  How futile, how often fruitless.  How pointless.

Then my wife and I moved to Oregon three years ago and bought a home.  This area of the Pacific Northwest used to be thick with orchards.  Most of them are gone now, replaced by marijuana farms, that new green gold rush that stinks like skunk when you drive down the road with your windows down.  But I digress.

The house we bought two years ago has apple trees, and a pretty big back yard.  Great, I thought.  More maintenance.  More things to waste my weekend on.  And those flower beds; my wife will plant something but expect me to maintain it.  How obnoxious.  But I love her so I guess I'll do it.  So I bought some new gardening gloves and a wide brimmed hat to protect me from the sun and got to work.

At first I cut the grass with a bad attitude.  This is so dumb, why even waste time and water on grass, we're in a historic drought, God it's hot, I wish I were inside in the AC.  But there's alot to be said for finishing a task with tangible gains; my lawn was previously unkempt and now it looks good.  Not great, but pretty good.  And sure, I have a sweat going, but it's a good honest sweat.  I feel clean, even though I'm actually quite dirty.  And when you see the love of your life playing on that selfsame grass with your dogs, it stirs a feeling.  A quiet pride.  A love.

Of course, simply running a mower alone just won't do.  So I dig out the unsightly weeds, I do the edging so my lines are clean.  Hell, I even make compost, because it would be a shame if those flowerbeds remained empty, so I plant native wildflowers for the bees and milkweed for the Monarch butterflies.  And I see those bees a-buzzing and those butterflies a-Monarching and there's that feeling again.  That quiet pride.  That love.

And those apple trees.  Remember them?  After I redid the sprinklers and the water system, they not only produced fruit but they flourished.  And now I have to check them once a week this time of year to pick the ones that are ready, though to be sure the birds and the bugs eat their fair share.

Now I have all these apples; what's a man gonna do with dozens of pounds of apples?  So I make pies, about two or three a week, and hand them out to my neighbors.  I walk up to their doors and knock and say hey there, it's your neighbor, my apple trees are going crazy this year, we have just too many apples for just my wife and I, so I made you a pie.  Yep, homemade from scratch.  Nope, you don't have to worry about returning the tin anytime soon; I've got plenty.  And you see the looks on their faces, the happiness and the smiles, and they tell you thanks and there's that warm feeling.  That quiet pride.  That love.

And the next time you are putzing around in your garden, the neighbors from across the street come over and say hi.  You open the gate in the fence and they make comments that essentially boil down to "the work you've done out here has paid dividends.  It's been worth it." And there is that feeling again.

And you become closer with your neighbors, how could you not, and they invite you over for dinner and you invite them in turn.  And soon you're having people over to just hang out in your garden, sipping drinks in the shade as someone's grandkids chase butterflies.  When you go down to the garden store, you find it's no longer grumpiness in your heart and the threat of a pissed off spouse that is your primary motivation.  It's some other feeling entirely.  Some quiet and something lovely.

I get it now mom.  I totally get it.


Thread over, we have a winner.  Great story well told.  Your Mom would be proud.
 
2022-09-25 12:25:26 PM  
My squash have decided to specialize in leaf growth.
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There are some nice sized ones in there and a lot of new ones starting. Hopefully they'll grow enough before the frost gets here.
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2022-09-25 12:30:10 PM  
When I was a kid I was crazy about Cheech & Chong. I even drew pot leafs on all my book covers.  Fast forward a few years.  I would always talk with the hot Latina across the alley from my childhood home. And there was this plant that stood high enough over the fence that I would play with it's leafs.
Some time later my mom was doing landscaping.  And she digs that plant up down to the roots.  I was shocked how dip she dug.
Turns out it was pot. ROFLMAO I never knew.  I was playing with pot leaves while talking to my neighbor, for the longest time. 😆 and I didn't even know it.
This is why I don't trust people, especially cops.
 
2022-09-25 12:42:08 PM  
My sainted mother was a journalist before I came along. She continued to freelance and had a knack for finding interesting features and getting people to open up about their areas of expertise. My brother and I often tagged along.

Mom got to know people from the Chippewa Indian Tribe in Mt. Pleasant, MI and wrote about them.The following details are from family lore as I was too young to remember. Mom and these folks got on famously, and as a gift, they passed along some yellow raspberry plants (perhaps these go by another name) with a delicate flavor.

Mom and Dad carried parts of those plants with them as they moved around the midwest and finally the east coast. Late last year Mrs. Pod and I dug and carefully washed bare-root cuttings of these plants, which are now growing enthusiastically on the west coast. No flowers this year, but maybe next.

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2022-09-25 12:43:19 PM  

Man_Without_A_Hat: I never liked gardening.  I associated it with work, with being outside on hot Nevada summers and pulling weeds that grew and grew and grew, an endless and ultimately pointless task.  I associated it with my mother, who never seemed to tire of this activity.  Of pathetic corn husks and strawberries eaten by rabbits, tomatoes half-rotted on the vine.  All this work, and for what?  How futile, how often fruitless.  How pointless.

Then my wife and I moved to Oregon three years ago and bought a home.  This area of the Pacific Northwest used to be thick with orchards.  Most of them are gone now, replaced by marijuana farms, that new green gold rush that stinks like skunk when you drive down the road with your windows down.  But I digress.

The house we bought two years ago has apple trees, and a pretty big back yard.  Great, I thought.  More maintenance.  More things to waste my weekend on.  And those flower beds; my wife will plant something but expect me to maintain it.  How obnoxious.  But I love her so I guess I'll do it.  So I bought some new gardening gloves and a wide brimmed hat to protect me from the sun and got to work.

At first I cut the grass with a bad attitude.  This is so dumb, why even waste time and water on grass, we're in a historic drought, God it's hot, I wish I were inside in the AC.  But there's alot to be said for finishing a task with tangible gains; my lawn was previously unkempt and now it looks good.  Not great, but pretty good.  And sure, I have a sweat going, but it's a good honest sweat.  I feel clean, even though I'm actually quite dirty.  And when you see the love of your life playing on that selfsame grass with your dogs, it stirs a feeling.  A quiet pride.  A love.

Of course, simply running a mower alone just won't do.  So I dig out the unsightly weeds, I do the edging so my lines are clean.  Hell, I even make compost, because it would be a shame if those flowerbeds remained empty, so I plant native wildflowers for the bees and milkweed for the Monarch butterflies.  And I see those bees a-buzzing and those butterflies a-Monarching and there's that feeling again.  That quiet pride.  That love.

And those apple trees.  Remember them?  After I redid the sprinklers and the water system, they not only produced fruit but they flourished.  And now I have to check them once a week this time of year to pick the ones that are ready, though to be sure the birds and the bugs eat their fair share.

Now I have all these apples; what's a man gonna do with dozens of pounds of apples?  So I make pies, about two or three a week, and hand them out to my neighbors.  I walk up to their doors and knock and say hey there, it's your neighbor, my apple trees are going crazy this year, we have just too many apples for just my wife and I, so I made you a pie.  Yep, homemade from scratch.  Nope, you don't have to worry about returning the tin anytime soon; I've got plenty.  And you see the looks on their faces, the happiness and the smiles, and they tell you thanks and there's that warm feeling.  That quiet pride.  That love.

And the next time you are putzing around in your garden, the neighbors from across the street come over and say hi.  You open the gate in the fence and they make comments that essentially boil down to "the work you've done out here has paid dividends.  It's been worth it." And there is that feeling again.

And you become closer with your neighbors, how could you not, and they invite you over for dinner and you invite them in turn.  And soon you're having people over to just hang out in your garden, sipping drinks in the shade as someone's grandkids chase butterflies.  When you go down to the garden store, you find it's no longer grumpiness in your heart and the threat of a pissed off spouse that is your primary motivation.  It's some other feeling entirely.  Some quiet and something lovely.

I get it now mom.  I totally get it.

So I bought some new gardening gloves and a wide brimmed hat to protect me from the sun and got to work.



User name does not check out.

But that's a cool story.
/planning to move to Oregon.
 
2022-09-25 1:18:50 PM  
I don't have a lot of gardening space, but put cuttings on my windowsill sometimes to see what they'll do. The other day I pulled the leaves off a beet and cut the top off to prepare it. There were a lot of tiny leaves on it still, so i put it in some water, which expectedly turned red. Unexpectedly, the next day the water was clear, which i thought was pretty interesting. I Am also trying to sprout some ginger root, which has a few nubby roots (rhizomes?) on it.
 
2022-09-25 1:50:21 PM  
We live in a basement apartment. I keep basil, oregano, and thyme right outside the window. Also helps with privacy.
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