Skip to content
Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Some Guy)   Long before the Druids invented henges, lived a race of people who made this newly discovered Neolithic Dirt Circle. Nobody knows who they were or what they were doing   (english.radio.cz) divider line
    More: Interesting, Neolithic, so-called roundel, Stone Age, Czech Republic, such roundel, Prague, economic centre, Prehistory  
•       •       •

972 clicks; posted to STEM » on 25 Sep 2022 at 11:05 AM (9 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



15 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-09-25 11:12:23 AM  
They had wood, bone, and stone as their tech.  It's incredibly unlikely that anything truly enlightening will be uncovered given that pretty much all of it would rapidly biodegrade without ongoing maintenance, but I guess the archaeologists are going on hope.
 
2022-09-25 11:15:26 AM  
Neolithic Dirt Circle is the name of my Burning Man juggalo kazoo cover band.
 
2022-09-25 12:35:27 PM  
We may not know but the odds are it had to with beer and incredibly attractive women.
 
2022-09-25 1:37:20 PM  

Unsung_Hero: They had wood, bone, and stone as their tech.  It's incredibly unlikely that anything truly enlightening will be uncovered given that pretty much all of it would rapidly biodegrade without ongoing maintenance, but I guess the archaeologists are going on hope.


Hope is part of the job. Archaeology is just as much about happy accidents as it is about science.
 
2022-09-25 1:46:52 PM  
And thus Red Neckin was born.

bristolmotorspeedway.comView Full Size
 
2022-09-25 3:32:46 PM  
Any guesses as whether that put it before or after agriculture in the area? Mesopotamians and Egyptians may have been already farming for ten thousand years, but that doesn't mean they were doing so in Prague.  More likely one lead to the other, but who knows which?

I've heard there's a site in Turkey that predates even the earliest farming.  That should clue us in more.
 
2022-09-25 3:49:04 PM  
Did it have a shrubbery?  Arranged with another shrubbery, one a little higher than the other so you get a two-level effect, and with a path down the middle?
 
2022-09-25 3:59:20 PM  

yet_another_wumpus: I've heard there's a site in Turkey that predates even the earliest farming.


Gobekli Tepe is older than significant human civilization at 10,000 BCE... but the earliest agriculture known was 12kya.  You might notice those dates are the same, and I believe the error bars on the estimates for each allow for overlap.

Still, I'd think that even a pre-agricultural people could benefit from having a gathering place.  They could all meet annually or have smaller groups randomly meet up as they pass through during the year.  Regardless, it'd be a way to conveniently barter whatever excess they might carry with them, marry off young women outside the family, and maintain ties with other hunter-gatherer groups to generate a feeling of security.  The more people you recognize and have had meals with, the less likely you are to come upon strangers and not know if they're likely to kill you or not.

They'd have shared stories which given the time period would likely have involved precursors to religion if not something we'd recognize as a modern faith, there would be cultural mixing to keep them as one group with one language, but I doubt there was a centralized faith with a priesthood wielding political power and laying down rules.

And while you're there meeting up periodically, I can see some industrious folk deciding to make some improvements - like a roof to keep rain off everyone and walls to keep wild animals out.

Essentially what I'm trying to get at is that I see these places as far more likely to be 'community centers' than temples.  Unknown things in archeology always seem to get tagged as 'religious', at least in the pop science reporting of them.

What I don't understand is why there weren't more of these places.  If you're part of a nomadic tribe and you visited a nice big solid building at least once a year... would tents or lean-tos continue to 'do it' for you?  I think you'd start considering a regular migration route through your territory and slowly build more permanent structures around it with whatever free time you had, so that eventually you'd always have a secure place to sleep and you wouldn't need to carry your house with you any longer.  Maybe leave stashes of tools and weapons and pots at each too.

Maybe they did, but the smaller dwellings left no traces.
 
2022-09-25 5:34:26 PM  
pretty sure stonehenge pre-dates the druids

/they just coopted it
 
2022-09-25 6:24:01 PM  
People just hung out in circles back then. There was nothing else to do. Hanging out at the circle, that was something to do.
 
2022-09-25 6:39:07 PM  

petec: pretty sure stonehenge pre-dates the druids

/they just coopted it


Know how I know You've never watched Spinal Tap?
 
2022-09-25 7:33:55 PM  
It was built by the Golem. Golems have always been real estate developers.
 
2022-09-25 7:54:59 PM  

ieerto: petec: pretty sure stonehenge pre-dates the druids

/they just coopted it

Know how I know You've never watched Spinal Tap?


i've been to stonehenge, and just by coincidence, it was the summer solstice and the druids were doing their thing

also walked around avebury for a bit, which pre-dates stonehenge by 800 years
 
2022-09-25 8:04:10 PM  

Unsung_Hero: yet_another_wumpus: I've heard there's a site in Turkey that predates even the earliest farming.

Gobekli Tepe is older than significant human civilization at 10,000 BCE... but the earliest agriculture known was 12kya.  You might notice those dates are the same, and I believe the error bars on the estimates for each allow for overlap.

Still, I'd think that even a pre-agricultural people could benefit from having a gathering place.  They could all meet annually or have smaller groups randomly meet up as they pass through during the year.  Regardless, it'd be a way to conveniently barter whatever excess they might carry with them, marry off young women outside the family, and maintain ties with other hunter-gatherer groups to generate a feeling of security.  The more people you recognize and have had meals with, the less likely you are to come upon strangers and not know if they're likely to kill you or not.

They'd have shared stories which given the time period would likely have involved precursors to religion if not something we'd recognize as a modern faith, there would be cultural mixing to keep them as one group with one language, but I doubt there was a centralized faith with a priesthood wielding political power and laying down rules.

And while you're there meeting up periodically, I can see some industrious folk deciding to make some improvements - like a roof to keep rain off everyone and walls to keep wild animals out.

Essentially what I'm trying to get at is that I see these places as far more likely to be 'community centers' than temples.  Unknown things in archeology always seem to get tagged as 'religious', at least in the pop science reporting of them.

What I don't understand is why there weren't more of these places.  If you're part of a nomadic tribe and you visited a nice big solid building at least once a year... would tents or lean-tos continue to 'do it' for you?  I think you'd start considering a regular migration route through your territory and slowly build more permanent structures around it with whatever free time you had, so that eventually you'd always have a secure place to sleep and you wouldn't need to carry your house with you any longer.  Maybe leave stashes of tools and weapons and pots at each too.

Maybe they did, but the smaller dwellings left no traces.


People confuse "ritual" with "religion." These, by definition, would have been either ritual sites or fortifications, or both. Rituals can include things like birthday parties, getting your driver's permit, things like that. An annual neighborhood cookout. A place where everyone comes to conduct trade at a certain time under formal rules. The seventh inning stretch. All are rituals but not necessarily religious.

The formalism of the built landscape relative to what else we know about general neolithic conditions are what make archaeologists say "This is a ritual center." Religion is only one possibility for the basis of the rituals.
 
2022-09-25 8:29:33 PM  
Ancient circle of dirt?

Not that secret....

western-locations-spain.comView Full Size
 
Displayed 15 of 15 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking




On Twitter


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.