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(Daily Boulder)   The James Webb Space Telescope has a problem and it has to be fixed from earth because it's too far away to send astronauts as they did with the Hubble   (dailyboulder.com) divider line
    More: News, Hubble Space Telescope, number of observational modes, James Webb Space Telescope, NASA's Tuesday announcement, grating-wheel, advanced telescope, NASA, good health  
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5167 clicks; posted to Main » and STEM » on 22 Sep 2022 at 2:05 PM (11 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-09-22 1:22:25 PM  
i.chzbgr.comView Full Size
 
2022-09-22 2:07:10 PM  
Have they tried turning it off and on again?
 
2022-09-22 2:07:56 PM  
Finally!  About time they built the space elevator.
 
2022-09-22 2:08:10 PM  
It must've stumbled upon a gay area in space and refuses to acknowledge it
 
2022-09-22 2:09:42 PM  

Karma Chameleon: It must've stumbled upon a gay area in space and refuses to acknowledge it


The Fabulous Zone
 
2022-09-22 2:12:29 PM  
Well that was a good three or four months of work for the multi-billion dollar telescope...

Seriously though, it is one instrument that is experiencing issues, hopefully they can find a workaround.  Building in redundancy is one of the reasons why these observatories are so damn expensive.  Hubble wasn't perfect either, but unlike that telescope, we can't get up there to fix it (we couldn't fix it if a problem occurred in the Hubble today since the shuttle was retired).
 
2022-09-22 2:13:21 PM  
Was probably shot by Jewish space lasers.
 
2022-09-22 2:13:30 PM  

Russ1642: Have they tried turning it off and on again?


c.tenor.comView Full Size
 
2022-09-22 2:15:00 PM  
NASA's states the wheel "exhibited what appears to be increased friction during setup for a science observation."
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-09-22 2:15:31 PM  
Since launching on Dec. 25, 2021, JWST has been pelted by at least 19 tiny space rocks


And that was from July.  19 little bullets.   This is just one reason "we're going to colonize Mars" is farking nonsense.  There's a great deal we don't know about space. . . and just one of them is "how many bullets are we gonna take out there?
 
2022-09-22 2:16:23 PM  

DarnoKonrad: Since launching on Dec. 25, 2021, JWST has been pelted by at least 19 tiny space rocks


And that was from July.  19 little bullets.   This is just one reason "we're going to colonize Mars" is farking nonsense.  There's a great deal we don't know about space. . . and just one of them is "how many bullets are we gonna take out there?


Easy there, Quantum Apostrophe.
 
2022-09-22 2:16:39 PM  
Being unencumbered by knowledge, they knew that they weren't going to be able to fix anything becuase it was too far away. This was always a risk and I have to assume that an analysis was done as part of the design on what could be done if a specific component failed. The first reaction when something goes wrong is to fix the thing that is broken but sometimes you can't hand have to step back and find a way to get the same functionality without the part.

Anyways, nothing is foolproof, this is only one camera, and it was a known risk for the project.
 
2022-09-22 2:17:29 PM  
This is a job for BOB.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-09-22 2:18:40 PM  
I hope they can fix it soon, the pictures are spectacular
 
2022-09-22 2:19:13 PM  

DarnoKonrad: Since launching on Dec. 25, 2021, JWST has been pelted by at least 19 tiny space rocks


And that was from July.  19 little bullets.   This is just one reason "we're going to colonize Mars" is farking nonsense.  There's a great deal we don't know about space. . . and just one of them is "how many bullets are we gonna take out there?


Quark needs to pick up more space baggies before alien raccoons dig into them.
 
2022-09-22 2:20:31 PM  
We have radio controlled cars and a helicopter on Mars ffs.  Get it together.
 
2022-09-22 2:24:21 PM  

backhand.slap.of.reason: This is a job for BOB.

[Fark user image image 425x462]


Fark user imageView Full Size

Last image from JWT
 
2022-09-22 2:25:39 PM  

DarnoKonrad: Since launching on Dec. 25, 2021, JWST has been pelted by at least 19 tiny space rocks


And that was from July.  19 little bullets.   This is just one reason "we're going to colonize Mars" is farking nonsense.  There's a great deal we don't know about space. . . and just one of them is "how many bullets are we gonna take out there?


This is America. If we can expect our elementary schoolers to risk taking a bullet or two on any given school day, our scientists and engineers can suck it up and take a few on the way to Mars.

/Apply bulletproof backpack technology to spacecraft.
 
2022-09-22 2:29:27 PM  
Literally the exact same article from the other day.  Stop posting trash from The Daily Boulder
/Your mom experiences increased friction every night
//until the Astroglide comes out
 
2022-09-22 2:29:36 PM  
Yes, sending a trillion dollar piece of equipment to outer space with no callbacks is kind of risky.

DarnoKonrad: Since launching on Dec. 25, 2021, JWST has been pelted by at least 19 tiny space rocks
And that was from July.  19 little bullets.   This is just one reason "we're going to colonize Mars" is farking nonsense.  There's a great deal we don't know about space. . . and just one of them is "how many bullets are we gonna take out there?


oh honey, it's going to work out great.  We have the greatest criminal minds on earth working on making it mandatory that we get to Mars.  Forever.
I'm so impressed, I just want to climb on his rocket and blast off.

well, I'm not, but most people with a dick seem to be. That's how we got to the point of thinking, Gee, wouldn't it be cool if we farked up this planet beyond redemption, and had to go to outer space to save our lives?
What the fark is wrong with you people, besides not understanding biology or physics or having one iota of empathy?  Besides THAT, I mean.  What else is wrong with you?
 
2022-09-22 2:30:13 PM  
Hope it still under warranty

Maybe musk will send a tesla up in a rocket again to fix it
 
2022-09-22 2:30:27 PM  

Eat The Placenta: NASA's states the wheel "exhibited what appears to be increased friction during setup for a science observation."


Nothing that sending up some Astroglide can't cure
 
2022-09-22 2:31:48 PM  
Whatever it takes, as long as it is covered by the warranty.
 
2022-09-22 2:33:16 PM  
I've met the guy who fixed the Hubble
He wrote all the manuals on what to do if something went wrong
needless to say, he didn't plan on them putting the wrong size mirror in

So he had to write the manual, then go back up and supervise it.
 
2022-09-22 2:35:37 PM  

Destructor: [i.chzbgr.com image 426x426]


Alright that picture cracks me up, big time.
 
2022-09-22 2:35:56 PM  
quote unquote "Astroglide" Trifecta has entered the chat.
 
2022-09-22 2:36:32 PM  
Is that..... chorizo grease?

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-09-22 2:37:16 PM  

Daedalus27: Well that was a good three or four months of work for the multi-billion dollar telescope...

Seriously though, it is one instrument that is experiencing issues, hopefully they can find a workaround.  Building in redundancy is one of the reasons why these observatories are so damn expensive.  Hubble wasn't perfect either, but unlike that telescope, we can't get up there to fix it (we couldn't fix it if a problem occurred in the Hubble today since the shuttle was retired).


One mode of one instrument. The issue is the grating wheel for the medium resolution spectroscopic imaging mode on MIRI. The other three modes on MIRI (and the other 12 modes between all four instruments) are fine.

This is precautionary, they moved a grating wheel and it took more energy than required, so they stopped and are analyzing what the issue could be and what they can do to mitigate or correct it. It's one of these two wheels.

https://jwst-docs.stsci.edu/jwst-mid-infrared-instrument/miri-instrumentation/miri-spectroscopic-elements#MIRISpectroscopicElements-dichroicDichroicfilter/gratingcombinationwheels

If they can't get the "sticky" wheel unstuck, they'll lose half the detectors for the mode. Here's MIRI's focal plane on the entire plane

https://jwst-docs.stsci.edu/files/97977569/97977580/1/1596073101688/fov7_miri_1000.png

The large rectangle is for the imagers, the four smaller squares are for the medium resolution spectrograph, and the small thin rectangle is for the low resolution spectrograph. Losing a wheel means two of the four medium res spectrographic detectors won't get an image and they'll lose parts of the bandwidth corresponding to those detectors. This would be sucky but they'd still have something. The reason for medium and low res is medium gets a wider bandwidth and better resolution, but the low resolution version is much more sensitive and can see dimmer things.


NASA/STScI's goal path will be

1) Can we restore to nominal?
2) If not, can we accept what we have and work normally?
3) If not, can we get to a useful state with most functionality?
4) If not, can we bypass the problem and get some use out of the affected instruments?
5) If not, can we make sure the problem remains isolated so other functions aren't affected?
6) If not, can we drink heavily?

I might have made the last one up.

Witness Galileo, when they tried to open the high gain antenna and it did't.

1) Can we restore to nominal? No, we tried for months, it's not opening.
2) Can we accept the new normal? No, the data loss is too great.
3) Can we get to a useful state with most functionality? Yes, by uploading a new encoding method and using PRML techniques, they could get a 1kb/sec data rate from the low gain antenna and complete all the mission goals.
4) not needed
5) not needed
6) Sure, they deserved a few cold ones for this save!

So....this is annoying, but it's neither the end of JWST nor the end of MIRI Middle resolution spectrographic imaging. They've redone the Cycle 1 schedule, moving requests for this mode back as they come up and moving other observations forward, so the telescope is working full time taking data. The hope is that they can get to 1 or 2 and bring the mode fully online, but if they can't, they'll figure out the best workaround to get the most functionality they can out of this mode.
 
2022-09-22 2:38:31 PM  
See, this is what happens when you skimp and don't get the extended warranty with next day parts replacement.
 
2022-09-22 2:41:31 PM  

cryinoutloud: Yes, sending a trillion dollar piece of equipment to outer space with no callbacks is kind of risky.

DarnoKonrad: Since launching on Dec. 25, 2021, JWST has been pelted by at least 19 tiny space rocks
And that was from July.  19 little bullets.   This is just one reason "we're going to colonize Mars" is farking nonsense.  There's a great deal we don't know about space. . . and just one of them is "how many bullets are we gonna take out there?

oh honey, it's going to work out great.  We have the greatest criminal minds on earth working on making it mandatory that we get to Mars.  Forever.
I'm so impressed, I just want to climb on his rocket and blast off.

well, I'm not, but most people with a dick seem to be. That's how we got to the point of thinking, Gee, wouldn't it be cool if we farked up this planet beyond redemption, and had to go to outer space to save our lives?
What the fark is wrong with you people, besides not understanding biology or physics or having one iota of empathy?  Besides THAT, I mean.  What else is wrong with you?


y.yarn.coView Full Size


/btw I agree with you about Elon
 
2022-09-22 2:42:25 PM  

You Are All Sheep: Finally!  About time they built the space elevator.


Nope, even better:

South Park - Ladder To Heaven
Youtube VJ_E7Vce8vU
 
2022-09-22 2:46:30 PM  

maxandgrinch: Is that..... chorizo grease?

[Fark user image image 425x287]


Naw. Just got some Space Ork spores that are starting up a colony there.
 
2022-09-22 2:48:34 PM  
Remind me later

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-09-22 2:53:54 PM  
Can't they just deploy a shuttlecraft with an engineering away team in it over to the thing and fix it inside of 30 minutes? Geordie to the bridge!
 
2022-09-22 2:54:30 PM  

NuclearPenguins: DarnoKonrad: Since launching on Dec. 25, 2021, JWST has been pelted by at least 19 tiny space rocks


And that was from July.  19 little bullets.   This is just one reason "we're going to colonize Mars" is farking nonsense.  There's a great deal we don't know about space. . . and just one of them is "how many bullets are we gonna take out there?

Easy there, Quantum Apostrophe.


This telescope should have contained a built-in 3D printer, so it could manufacture any part that might go bad, and repair itself!
 
2022-09-22 2:55:14 PM  

Begoggle: NuclearPenguins: DarnoKonrad: Since launching on Dec. 25, 2021, JWST has been pelted by at least 19 tiny space rocks


And that was from July.  19 little bullets.   This is just one reason "we're going to colonize Mars" is farking nonsense.  There's a great deal we don't know about space. . . and just one of them is "how many bullets are we gonna take out there?

Easy there, Quantum Apostrophe.

This telescope should have contained a built-in 3D printer, so it could manufacture any part that might go bad, and repair itself!


Wherever he is, his head just exploded.
 
2022-09-22 2:58:27 PM  
NASA needs to develop a robotic service package for situations like this. Something plug and play.
 
2022-09-22 3:02:44 PM  
Was probably shot by Native American (Guardian) Space Lasers.

/wat?
 
2022-09-22 3:04:57 PM  
A "grating-wheel" mechanism for this mode, which helps scientists further narrow down and select the sort of wavelength through which they want to view the Universe, had an issue on August 24. NASA's Tuesday announcement states the wheel "exhibited what appears to be increased friction during setup for a science observation."

tl;dr: The gratings are grinding
 
2022-09-22 3:20:12 PM  

guestguy: Russ1642: Have they tried turning it off and on again?

[c.tenor.com image 480x270] [View Full Size image _x_]


Is it plugged in?
 
2022-09-22 3:25:15 PM  
NASA's Tuesday announcement states the wheel "exhibited what appears to be increased friction during setup for a science observation."

You gotta go forward and reverse to rock it back and forth. That'll get it unstuck.
 
2022-09-22 3:26:18 PM  

X-Geek: NASA's Tuesday announcement states the wheel "exhibited what appears to be increased friction during setup for a science observation."

You gotta go forward and reverse to rock it back and forth. That'll get it unstuck.


That's essentially what they're gonna do.

Maybe heat it up a bit, too, if they can...
 
2022-09-22 3:41:14 PM  
Have they tried sending thoughts and prayers?   I'm told that's the solution for everything.

Mind you, I had some issues with gain in an electronic circuit some months back and no amount of praying seemed to help.  Eventually I had to resort to science and recalculate the gain figures and replace some components and then it worked.  Maybe I was just praying wrong?
 
2022-09-22 3:43:59 PM  

bughunter: A "grating-wheel" mechanism for this mode, which helps scientists further narrow down and select the sort of wavelength through which they want to view the Universe, had an issue on August 24. NASA's Tuesday announcement states the wheel "exhibited what appears to be increased friction during setup for a science observation."

tl;dr: The gratings are grinding


They forgot the hyphen and ordered a "grating wheel" by mistake.
 
2022-09-22 4:03:07 PM  

CluelessMoron: Have they tried sending thoughts and prayers?   I'm told that's the solution for everything.

Mind you, I had some issues with gain in an electronic circuit some months back and no amount of praying seemed to help.  Eventually I had to resort to science and recalculate the gain figures and replace some components and then it worked.  Maybe I was just praying wrong?


You clearly used substandard holy unguents and purity seals.
 
2022-09-22 4:10:09 PM  
This news grinds my gears.
 
2022-09-22 4:11:39 PM  

GalFisk: bughunter: A "grating-wheel" mechanism for this mode, which helps scientists further narrow down and select the sort of wavelength through which they want to view the Universe, had an issue on August 24. NASA's Tuesday announcement states the wheel "exhibited what appears to be increased friction during setup for a science observation."

tl;dr: The gratings are grinding

They forgot the hyphen and ordered a "grating wheel" by mistake.


Well it can't be all that grate if it's not working!

I'll let myself out...
 
2022-09-22 4:25:52 PM  

inner ted: backhand.slap.of.reason: This is a job for BOB.

[Fark user image image 425x462]

[Fark user image 250x353]
Last image from JWT


Damn you sir.  That movie scared the bejeezus out of me as a kid.
 
2022-09-22 4:39:15 PM  
So, I guesselecting a name that didn't rhyme with "Trouble" didn't help?

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-09-22 4:41:56 PM  
As long as it provides us with a definitive look at Uranus it will have been worth it.
 
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