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(WCVB Boston)   Dead couple leave estate instructions for their 5 kids to sell the house that has been in the family since '96. Fark: 1696, that is   (wcvb.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, American Revolutionary War, Deacon Edward Wheeler, next generation of the Wheeler family, most recent owners, Continental Army, historic Massachusetts, interior features, Wicked Local reported.Their estate documents  
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6135 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Sep 2022 at 8:30 AM (2 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-09-15 8:18:52 AM  
Landscape, but sift
 
2022-09-15 8:24:27 AM  
Highlights of the home include original pine plank floors, original hardware, and a unique heart-shaped cutout in the framing between the entryway and the main foyer.

I don't know if I would consider that last part a "highlight."  It's cute, but really?

m1.cbhomes.comView Full Size


/maybe if you painted the word "live" on one side of it, and "laugh" on the other, the house would sell for more
 
2022-09-15 8:34:02 AM  

Dr.Fey: Highlights of the home include original pine plank floors, original hardware, and a unique heart-shaped cutout in the framing between the entryway and the main foyer.

I don't know if I would consider that last part a "highlight."  It's cute, but really?

[m1.cbhomes.com image 402x268]

/maybe if you painted the word "live" on one side of it, and "laugh" on the other, the house would sell for more


I question "original pine floors" in something that old unless they started a foot thick and were rarely sanded down and refinished.

My oak floors are very overdue for a refinishing but they are on their last sanding likely. 1953 oak tongue and groove, 1.25" narrow strips.

When we renovated, the exposed edges showed we were VERY close to the tongue and groove and nails. Pretty sure the 1950s finish and glues is the only thing holding them together
 
2022-09-15 8:38:58 AM  
Wife works in Estate Law.  The stories I hear are fascinating and horrifying.  If you aren't VERY explicit in your will, your kids and relatives will go to war over whatever you leave behind (and destroy their relationships).  If you want your family to stay together, don't skimp on the will.  Don't TRUST someone do to the right thing - WRITE IT DOWN!

/Legalzoom - not even once
 
2022-09-15 8:40:25 AM  

montreal_medic: Dr.Fey: Highlights of the home include original pine plank floors, original hardware, and a unique heart-shaped cutout in the framing between the entryway and the main foyer.

I don't know if I would consider that last part a "highlight."  It's cute, but really?

[m1.cbhomes.com image 402x268]

/maybe if you painted the word "live" on one side of it, and "laugh" on the other, the house would sell for more

I question "original pine floors" in something that old unless they started a foot thick and were rarely sanded down and refinished.

My oak floors are very overdue for a refinishing but they are on their last sanding likely. 1953 oak tongue and groove, 1.25" narrow strips.

When we renovated, the exposed edges showed we were VERY close to the tongue and groove and nails. Pretty sure the 1950s finish and glues is the only thing holding them together


The pine floors were installed by Theseus
 
2022-09-15 8:52:04 AM  
We seriously considered buying a landmark house in 1690.  It had been extensively kept up and had quite nice appliances.  The land behind it was a private three hole golf course.   There were no other houses within shouting distance.

The first owner had been hanged by a kangaroo court that prosecutor who wanted the house.
The final owner had spent upwards of ten years trying to convince the local bureaucrats to allow some kind of renovation.
The land had a working watermill stream and flooding could have been a problem.
We would have ended up in some kind of social register as The Owners.

History comes with a price of patience when dealing with local boards.
 
2022-09-15 8:59:03 AM  
How do you document proper title of a property that old?

I guess somewhere in some municipal archive there's a 300 year old ledger that says so-and-so owns it, but do you then have to prove lineage and probate since then?
 
2022-09-15 9:00:12 AM  

sleze: Wife works in Estate Law.  The stories I hear are fascinating and horrifying.  If you aren't VERY explicit in your will, your kids and relatives will go to war over whatever you leave behind (and destroy their relationships).  If you want your family to stay together, don't skimp on the will.  Don't TRUST someone do to the right thing - WRITE IT DOWN!

/Legalzoom - not even once


I have seen it just on my block. Family members come from everywhere, entering the house at night just taking things.
If you live to be old enough give what you want to whonyou want when your alive.
estate planners are not just for rich people, they shelter your assets and good ones make a rock sold will.
 
2022-09-15 9:01:44 AM  

BitwiseShift: We seriously considered buying a landmark house in 1690.


I know you meant "built" in 1690, but for a second I pictured you as an 300-year-old vampire.
 
2022-09-15 9:03:22 AM  

BitwiseShift: We seriously considered buying a landmark house in 1690. It had been extensively kept up and had quite nice appliances.  The land behind it was a private three hole golf course.   There were no other houses within shouting distance.

The first owner had been hanged by a kangaroo court that prosecutor who wanted the house.
The final owner had spent upwards of ten years trying to convince the local bureaucrats to allow some kind of renovation.
The land had a working watermill stream and flooding could have been a problem.
We would have ended up in some kind of social register as The Owners.

History comes with a price of patience when dealing with local boards.


Jesus, you've got a good memory. I can barely remember a thing from 1990, but you can remember what you were doing over 300 years ago.

/Are you a vampire, by the way?
 
2022-09-15 9:04:23 AM  
I should update my will
 
2022-09-15 9:04:37 AM  

montreal_medic: Dr.Fey: Highlights of the home include original pine plank floors, original hardware, and a unique heart-shaped cutout in the framing between the entryway and the main foyer.

I don't know if I would consider that last part a "highlight."  It's cute, but really?

[m1.cbhomes.com image 402x268]

/maybe if you painted the word "live" on one side of it, and "laugh" on the other, the house would sell for more

I question "original pine floors" in something that old unless they started a foot thick and were rarely sanded down and refinished.

My oak floors are very overdue for a refinishing but they are on their last sanding likely. 1953 oak tongue and groove, 1.25" narrow strips.

When we renovated, the exposed edges showed we were VERY close to the tongue and groove and nails. Pretty sure the 1950s finish and glues is the only thing holding them together


I am not a flooring expert, but if I know wood those floor boards are probably very thick compared to modern floors. Also the place has probably been valued for its historical significance for at least 200 years which means a lot more babying.
 
2022-09-15 9:15:43 AM  

BitwiseShift: We seriously considered buying a landmark house in 1690.


I know Fark's demographic skews older, but damn, just how old ARE you?
 
2022-09-15 9:16:56 AM  

Miss Cellania: BitwiseShift: We seriously considered buying a landmark house in 1690.

I know you meant "built" in 1690, but for a second I pictured you as an 300-year-old vampire.


Reading the thread is for suckers.
 
2022-09-15 9:19:43 AM  

ctighe2353: sleze: Wife works in Estate Law.  The stories I hear are fascinating and horrifying.  If you aren't VERY explicit in your will, your kids and relatives will go to war over whatever you leave behind (and destroy their relationships).  If you want your family to stay together, don't skimp on the will.  Don't TRUST someone do to the right thing - WRITE IT DOWN!

/Legalzoom - not even once

I have seen it just on my block. Family members come from everywhere, entering the house at night just taking things.
If you live to be old enough give what you want to whonyou want when your alive.
estate planners are not just for rich people, they shelter your assets and good ones make a rock sold will.


Estate planning atty here. The vast majority of will contests are over modest estates. You don't need a multi-million dollar estate to have kids fighting over it. It's about someone winning something or getting even.

As for kids pillaging--if you are the executor, one of the first things to do is change the locks. I've been executor of a few family members' estates and had to watch stuff like a hawk.

A tip for your will: have the atty include a clause that incorporates by reference a separate written list to give personal items. You can change those lists whenever you want.
 
2022-09-15 9:21:34 AM  
From watching numerous British shows during the pandemic about real estate and restoration, my main take away regarding buying a historic property-- and I say this as a history nerd whole love old architecture-- is DON'T DO IT.

At least, don't do that in England.  It seems in England that there is poor alignment between the modern Building Codes and the local history councils and the National Trust.  Basically a lot of "We want people to buy old buildings to preserve the heritage, but, we don't want you to change anything to make it livable in the 21st century. "
 
2022-09-15 9:25:01 AM  
Oh, I can buy a money pit that requires me to get permission to repair it from some local board?  Awesome!
 
2022-09-15 9:29:09 AM  

ImpendingCynic: How do you document proper title of a property that old?

I guess somewhere in some municipal archive there's a 300 year old ledger that says so-and-so owns it, but do you then have to prove lineage and probate since then?


At some point they started paying taxes on it. And many states do have some form of law that says "if you've occupied this plot of land unchallenged for X amount of years, you have a claim to it."
 
2022-09-15 9:29:58 AM  

sleze: Wife works in Estate Law.  The stories I hear are fascinating and horrifying.  If you aren't VERY explicit in your will, your kids and relatives will go to war over whatever you leave behind (and destroy their relationships).  If you want your family to stay together, don't skimp on the will.  Don't TRUST someone do to the right thing - WRITE IT DOWN!

/Legalzoom - not even once


I wonder if that's why they put it in their will to sell, to stop a big fight from tearing the family apart.  I can't imagine what else would make them want to end 300 years of family history.
 
2022-09-15 9:49:59 AM  

kbronsito: montreal_medic: Dr.Fey: Highlights of the home include original pine plank floors, original hardware, and a unique heart-shaped cutout in the framing between the entryway and the main foyer.

I don't know if I would consider that last part a "highlight."  It's cute, but really?

[m1.cbhomes.com image 402x268]

/maybe if you painted the word "live" on one side of it, and "laugh" on the other, the house would sell for more

I question "original pine floors" in something that old unless they started a foot thick and were rarely sanded down and refinished.

My oak floors are very overdue for a refinishing but they are on their last sanding likely. 1953 oak tongue and groove, 1.25" narrow strips.

When we renovated, the exposed edges showed we were VERY close to the tongue and groove and nails. Pretty sure the 1950s finish and glues is the only thing holding them together

The pine floors were installed by Theseus


I don't understand the reference, but I still funny'd it. Kinda like being in a crowd, and nervously laughing at a Dennis Miller joke that I didn't get. Back when he was funny.
 
2022-09-15 9:52:12 AM  

Xythero: sleze: Wife works in Estate Law.  The stories I hear are fascinating and horrifying.  If you aren't VERY explicit in your will, your kids and relatives will go to war over whatever you leave behind (and destroy their relationships).  If you want your family to stay together, don't skimp on the will.  Don't TRUST someone do to the right thing - WRITE IT DOWN!

/Legalzoom - not even once

I wonder if that's why they put it in their will to sell, to stop a big fight from tearing the family apart.  I can't imagine what else would make them want to end 300 years of family history.


I'm guessing none of the kids can afford to buy and maintain the place without significant support of the other siblings, so the parents didn't put the burden of trying to keep it in the family on any one (or all) of them.  Taxes are likely a huge part of that cost.

Watch "Starboard Light", a documentary about a family having to part with the cottage that had been in the family for 5 generations.  It was going to have huge property taxes (gentrification), and none of the heirs could afford it individually.  They were also constrained about what changes could be made to the place.  The ending is good news, but that's as much a spoiler as I'll post.
 
2022-09-15 9:54:19 AM  

sleze: Wife works in Estate Law.  The stories I hear are fascinating and horrifying.  If you aren't VERY explicit in your will, your kids and relatives will go to war over whatever you leave behind (and destroy their relationships).  If you want your family to stay together, don't skimp on the will.  Don't TRUST someone do to the right thing - WRITE IT DOWN!

/Legalzoom - not even once


This.gif

Lying biatch sister moved in with my mother during mom's last year or so.  LBS stole the master suite furniture my parent bought when they married back in the 50s.  We have no idea how much money from various accounts was siphoned off.  Mom had made one brother the Executor.  LBS fled in the dark of night (no idea where she is).  Mom had dementia and other brother and wife cared for her until she died.  Executor says "Take what you want from the house, because I'm not dealing with it (dumbass father got a reverse mortgage).  I'm 800 miles away and can't drop everything to run up and get stuff.  I get there about three weeks later and the house looks like it was ransacked by the Huns.  Executor was giving the house key to anyone with a pulse saying they can take what they want.  Other brother scrambled like mad to grab all kinds of stuff.  I was fortunate some stuff I wanted (and stuff that was mine) was still there.
 
2022-09-15 9:54:34 AM  
How many ghosts does it have?
 
2022-09-15 9:58:57 AM  

ChrisDe: kbronsito: montreal_medic: Dr.Fey: Highlights of the home include original pine plank floors, original hardware, and a unique heart-shaped cutout in the framing between the entryway and the main foyer.

I don't know if I would consider that last part a "highlight."  It's cute, but really?

[m1.cbhomes.com image 402x268]

/maybe if you painted the word "live" on one side of it, and "laugh" on the other, the house would sell for more

I question "original pine floors" in something that old unless they started a foot thick and were rarely sanded down and refinished.

My oak floors are very overdue for a refinishing but they are on their last sanding likely. 1953 oak tongue and groove, 1.25" narrow strips.

When we renovated, the exposed edges showed we were VERY close to the tongue and groove and nails. Pretty sure the 1950s finish and glues is the only thing holding them together

The pine floors were installed by Theseus

I don't understand the reference, but I still funny'd it. Kinda like being in a crowd, and nervously laughing at a Dennis Miller joke that I didn't get. Back when he was funny.


Ship of Theseus thought exercise

If you have an ancient ship - Theseus' ship - and over the centuries, replace the sails and oars... is it the same ship Theseus sailed?

How about if the wood planks making up the floors rot and need replacing? What about the main mast?

At some point, there will be no original parts. Not one part that was there when Theseus sailed his ship.

Is it still the ship he sailed?

If not, when did it cease to be? At the first change? At the first paint job? When?
 
2022-09-15 10:00:45 AM  

EBN-OZN: ctighe2353: sleze: Wife works in Estate Law.  The stories I hear are fascinating and horrifying.  If you aren't VERY explicit in your will, your kids and relatives will go to war over whatever you leave behind (and destroy their relationships).  If you want your family to stay together, don't skimp on the will.  Don't TRUST someone do to the right thing - WRITE IT DOWN!

/Legalzoom - not even once

I have seen it just on my block. Family members come from everywhere, entering the house at night just taking things.
If you live to be old enough give what you want to whonyou want when your alive.
estate planners are not just for rich people, they shelter your assets and good ones make a rock sold will.

Estate planning atty here. The vast majority of will contests are over modest estates. You don't need a multi-million dollar estate to have kids fighting over it. It's about someone winning something or getting even.

As for kids pillaging--if you are the executor, one of the first things to do is change the locks. I've been executor of a few family members' estates and had to watch stuff like a hawk.

A tip for your will: have the atty include a clause that incorporates by reference a separate written list to give personal items. You can change those lists whenever you want.


As an artist, I have a number of probably very vaulable art works done by other artists-one of whom is world famous. No one in the immediate family would enjoy them. Do I sell 'em off-right after the artist dies? Donate to the Smithonian so other folks could enjoy them?
Will be seeing an estate planner next month to get stuff in order. I like the separate list plan.
 
2022-09-15 10:03:46 AM  

montreal_medic: Dr.Fey: Highlights of the home include original pine plank floors, original hardware, and a unique heart-shaped cutout in the framing between the entryway and the main foyer.

I don't know if I would consider that last part a "highlight."  It's cute, but really?

[m1.cbhomes.com image 402x268]

/maybe if you painted the word "live" on one side of it, and "laugh" on the other, the house would sell for more

I question "original pine floors" in something that old unless they started a foot thick and were rarely sanded down and refinished.

My oak floors are very overdue for a refinishing but they are on their last sanding likely. 1953 oak tongue and groove, 1.25" narrow strips.

When we renovated, the exposed edges showed we were VERY close to the tongue and groove and nails. Pretty sure the 1950s finish and glues is the only thing holding them together


There's a pretty good chance that the floors were bare wood and no finish was applied until sometime in the late 1800s or early 1900s, so there would not have been repeated cycles of sanding an refinishing.  There still would have been wear from traffic, so I doubt all the floorboards are original.
 
2022-09-15 10:04:44 AM  

montreal_medic: ChrisDe: kbronsito: montreal_medic: Dr.Fey: Highlights of the home include original pine plank floors, original hardware, and a unique heart-shaped cutout in the framing between the entryway and the main foyer.

I don't know if I would consider that last part a "highlight."  It's cute, but really?

[m1.cbhomes.com image 402x268]

/maybe if you painted the word "live" on one side of it, and "laugh" on the other, the house would sell for more

I question "original pine floors" in something that old unless they started a foot thick and were rarely sanded down and refinished.

My oak floors are very overdue for a refinishing but they are on their last sanding likely. 1953 oak tongue and groove, 1.25" narrow strips.

When we renovated, the exposed edges showed we were VERY close to the tongue and groove and nails. Pretty sure the 1950s finish and glues is the only thing holding them together

The pine floors were installed by Theseus

I don't understand the reference, but I still funny'd it. Kinda like being in a crowd, and nervously laughing at a Dennis Miller joke that I didn't get. Back when he was funny.

Ship of Theseus thought exercise

If you have an ancient ship - Theseus' ship - and over the centuries, replace the sails and oars... is it the same ship Theseus sailed?

How about if the wood planks making up the floors rot and need replacing? What about the main mast?

At some point, there will be no original parts. Not one part that was there when Theseus sailed his ship.

Is it still the ship he sailed?

If not, when did it cease to be? At the first change? At the first paint job? When?


Very good, thanks. Who said you can't learn anything on Fark?

When I hear that reference again, I'll just think of my '87 Ford Escort.
 
2022-09-15 10:15:29 AM  
Century houses aren't for everyone.   Most localities will pay you to keep the place in original condition, and you get a pass on updated building codes forever, but it is a lot of work and if so much as one blade of grass on the lawn is out of place, they will get all up in your face about it.   Assuming it's an historical landmark, all sorts of other conditions apply.   You may have to allow visitors and their brats to tour it once in awhile.

Is living in a great old house worth dealing with essentially the worst HOA ever?
 
2022-09-15 10:25:26 AM  
I hate the whole historical preservation of things just because they are old.  There is a reason homes are rebuilt and renovated. To make them better.
I get the need to preserve truly historical places. Like the cottage Ben Franklin liked to bang married women in. That has valid historical significance. But some house that must be kept just because it is really old? I don't have to keep my refrigerator the way it is just because I've had it for 25 years.
And even for the historical homes that they make people keep the same, why does the insides have to be preserved? I get some historical HOA emperor not wanting the looks of anything in the neighborhood to change, but who's looking at the insides?
 
2022-09-15 10:33:20 AM  

sleze: Wife works in Estate Law.  The stories I hear are fascinating and horrifying.  If you aren't VERY explicit in your will, your kids and relatives will go to war over whatever you leave behind (and destroy their relationships).  If you want your family to stay together, don't skimp on the will.  Don't TRUST someone do to the right thing - WRITE IT DOWN!

/Legalzoom - not even once


And for the love of god put burial instructions in there.
 
2022-09-15 10:34:23 AM  

shut_it_down: sleze: Wife works in Estate Law.  The stories I hear are fascinating and horrifying.  If you aren't VERY explicit in your will, your kids and relatives will go to war over whatever you leave behind (and destroy their relationships).  If you want your family to stay together, don't skimp on the will.  Don't TRUST someone do to the right thing - WRITE IT DOWN!

/Legalzoom - not even once

And for the love of god put burial instructions in there.


Face down so people have a place to park their bicycles.
 
2022-09-15 10:34:50 AM  
Town where I grew up had a historical society, or as they were referred to: The Hysterical Society. HOAs could get a few pointers in cruelty from that group.
 
2022-09-15 10:36:15 AM  

EBN-OZN: ctighe2353: sleze: Wife works in Estate Law.  The stories I hear are fascinating and horrifying.  If you aren't VERY explicit in your will, your kids and relatives will go to war over whatever you leave behind (and destroy their relationships).  If you want your family to stay together, don't skimp on the will.  Don't TRUST someone do to the right thing - WRITE IT DOWN!

/Legalzoom - not even once

I have seen it just on my block. Family members come from everywhere, entering the house at night just taking things.
If you live to be old enough give what you want to whonyou want when your alive.
estate planners are not just for rich people, they shelter your assets and good ones make a rock sold will.

Estate planning atty here. The vast majority of will contests are over modest estates. You don't need a multi-million dollar estate to have kids fighting over it. It's about someone winning something or getting even.

As for kids pillaging--if you are the executor, one of the first things to do is change the locks. I've been executor of a few family members' estates and had to watch stuff like a hawk.

A tip for your will: have the atty include a clause that incorporates by reference a separate written list to give personal items. You can change those lists whenever you want.


Also, take copious pictures and make an inventory ASAP. Like the day you are appointed and are having the locks changed.
 
2022-09-15 10:41:39 AM  

montreal_medic: Dr.Fey: Highlights of the home include original pine plank floors, original hardware, and a unique heart-shaped cutout in the framing between the entryway and the main foyer.

I don't know if I would consider that last part a "highlight."  It's cute, but really?

[m1.cbhomes.com image 402x268]

/maybe if you painted the word "live" on one side of it, and "laugh" on the other, the house would sell for more

I question "original pine floors" in something that old unless they started a foot thick and were rarely sanded down and refinished.

My oak floors are very overdue for a refinishing but they are on their last sanding likely. 1953 oak tongue and groove, 1.25" narrow strips.

When we renovated, the exposed edges showed we were VERY close to the tongue and groove and nails. Pretty sure the 1950s finish and glues is the only thing holding them together


I don't question them, it's entirely possible the "boards" were hand-hewn in colonial America in 1650 and may well have been several inches thick.  They could even have been half-split logs, sanded on one side and layed directly into the earth or a leveled fill.  I doubt they were *ever* re-sanded for the first century of the house's use, just worn from foot traffic.
 
2022-09-15 10:43:30 AM  

ImpendingCynic: How do you document proper title of a property that old?

I guess somewhere in some municipal archive there's a 300 year old ledger that says so-and-so owns it, but do you then have to prove lineage and probate since then?


There is a legal concept called "latches". Named after the latch on a gate that closes after you go through it.

Basically it's like a statute of limitations. You only have so many years to dispute the ownership of a property before it becomes permanent.

It was invented hundreds of years ago to prevent people from simply bribing the oldest person in a village to make up some story about why they are the rightful heir of a property. (I want to say the 1300's, but my memory is foggy on this point.) The concept of latches was especially important because most land transactions weren't written back then.
 
2022-09-15 10:44:48 AM  

ChrisDe: montreal_medic: ChrisDe: kbronsito: montreal_medic: Dr.Fey: Highlights of the home include original pine plank floors, original hardware, and a unique heart-shaped cutout in the framing between the entryway and the main foyer.

...

When I hear that reference again, I'll just think of my '87 Ford Escort.



Hereafter to be known as Theseus' Ford Prefect.

Fark user imageView Full Size


just to f* with noobs.
 
2022-09-15 10:53:59 AM  

sleze: Wife works in Estate Law.  The stories I hear are fascinating and horrifying.If you aren't VERY explicit in your will, your kids and relatives will go to war over whatever you leave behind (and destroy their relationships). If you want your family to stay together, don't skimp on the will.  Don't TRUST someone do to the right thing - WRITE IT DOWN!

/Legalzoom - not even once


So sad and so very true in my experience. I've already through this once, essentially lost my uncle and one cousin. Next up is my father (82, fat and a borderline alcoholic), who is wealthy and used it ruthlessly. Lorded over others and pretty much bullied them. For some reason I never put up with it and stood up to him. We've become very close over the past few years. I do know he's incredibly detail oriented (as a CPA and former CEO) and talked on and off about his plans for the will so I'm thinking it'll be done right, which means according to his wishes and be legally watertight.
It ain't the $ I stand to inherit (beaucoup) that I worry about so much as the family squabbles. Weaker folk amongst the blended family may be led down fantasy lane and convince themselves they deserve something and start napalming what should an orderly execution of his FARKING WILL. Man's gotta right to put it where he wants when he's gone. Gotta respect that. Maybe not like it, but if it's legal them's the brakes.
 
2022-09-15 10:56:09 AM  

No Catchy Nickname: BitwiseShift: We seriously considered buying a landmark house in 1690. It had been extensively kept up and had quite nice appliances.  The land behind it was a private three hole golf course.   There were no other houses within shouting distance.

The first owner had been hanged by a kangaroo court that prosecutor who wanted the house.
The final owner had spent upwards of ten years trying to convince the local bureaucrats to allow some kind of renovation.
The land had a working watermill stream and flooding could have been a problem.
We would have ended up in some kind of social register as The Owners.

History comes with a price of patience when dealing with local boards.

Jesus, you've got a good memory. I can barely remember a thing from 1990, but you can remember what you were doing over 300 years ago.

/Are you a vampire, by the way?


Maybe they were born in 1518 in the village of Glenfinnan on the shores of Loch Shiel. And they are immortal.
 
2022-09-15 11:06:25 AM  
Pictures of the bathrooms on the MLS listing are conspicuously missing.

Oh wait, I found one:

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-09-15 11:07:31 AM  

Artist: Town where I grew up had a historical society, or as they were referred to: The Hysterical Society. HOAs could get a few pointers in cruelty from that group.


My parents call their local Historical Society the Hysterical Society. I'm guessing most people do that. It's still kind of funny, anyway.
 
2022-09-15 11:12:53 AM  
Olde Tyme Mem'ry
Youtube lwYxnpoB3gc
 
2022-09-15 11:20:43 AM  

MythDragon: And even for the historical homes that they make people keep the same, why does the insides have to be preserved? I get some historical HOA emperor not wanting the looks of anything in the neighborhood to change, but who's looking at the insides?


Most historical preservation requirements are exterior only, but it depends on the area.

Why buy a historical home if you're going to gut it?
 
2022-09-15 11:21:42 AM  

Madcaplaff: How many ghosts does it have?


The answer is always zero.
 
2022-09-15 11:21:50 AM  

sleze: Wife works in Estate Law.  The stories I hear are fascinating and horrifying.  If you aren't VERY explicit in your will, your kids and relatives will go to war over whatever you leave behind (and destroy their relationships).  If you want your family to stay together, don't skimp on the will.  Don't TRUST someone do to the right thing - WRITE IT DOWN!

/Legalzoom - not even once



If you own real estate, you really need a revocable living trust, not just a will.  In fact, if the value of your assets is above the "small estate" limit in your jurisdiction, you need a trust in order for your hers/beneficiaries to avoid probate.

Yeah Legalzoom sucks. It may save people money on the front end, but if you have any significant assets, that savings will be lost to estate administration costs later. You may avoid paying an estate planning lawyer, but you are making work for a probate lawyer down the road.
 
2022-09-15 11:23:26 AM  

monkeyboycjc: sleze: Wife works in Estate Law.  The stories I hear are fascinating and horrifying.If you aren't VERY explicit in your will, your kids and relatives will go to war over whatever you leave behind (and destroy their relationships). If you want your family to stay together, don't skimp on the will.  Don't TRUST someone do to the right thing - WRITE IT DOWN!

/Legalzoom - not even once

So sad and so very true in my experience. I've already through this once, essentially lost my uncle and one cousin. Next up is my father (82, fat and a borderline alcoholic), who is wealthy and used it ruthlessly. Lorded over others and pretty much bullied them. For some reason I never put up with it and stood up to him. We've become very close over the past few years. I do know he's incredibly detail oriented (as a CPA and former CEO) and talked on and off about his plans for the will so I'm thinking it'll be done right, which means according to his wishes and be legally watertight.
It ain't the $ I stand to inherit (beaucoup) that I worry about so much as the family squabbles. Weaker folk amongst the blended family may be led down fantasy lane and convince themselves they deserve something and start napalming what should an orderly execution of his FARKING WILL. Man's gotta right to put it where he wants when he's gone. Gotta respect that. Maybe not like it, but if it's legal them's the brakes.


Poison pill / no contest clauses can help. They're pretty common. Essentially they say that anyone who disputes the validity of the will shall be entitled to nothing.
 
2022-09-15 11:25:18 AM  

sleze: Wife works in Estate Law.  The stories I hear are fascinating and horrifying.  If you aren't VERY explicit in your will, your kids and relatives will go to war over whatever you leave behind (and destroy their relationships).  If you want your family to stay together, don't skimp on the will.  Don't TRUST someone do to the right thing - WRITE IT DOWN!

/Legalzoom - not even once


My wife's grandmother recently passed away after years of declining health. She was the last generation of familial wealth before her children returned to shirtsleeves work. Her brilliant idea was for everyone to take a pad of post it's and just put one on any item you wanted to inherit.

And magically, everything of value went to the family who spent the night in between the post it tagging and the lawyer writing it all up the next day.

Oh, and to make matters worse, the grandmother started giving away things to people who visited her after the will was written up. It's a mess.
 
2022-09-15 11:28:36 AM  

Artist: EBN-OZN: ctighe2353: sleze: Wife works in Estate Law.  The stories I hear are fascinating and horrifying.  If you aren't VERY explicit in your will, your kids and relatives will go to war over whatever you leave behind (and destroy their relationships).  If you want your family to stay together, don't skimp on the will.  Don't TRUST someone do to the right thing - WRITE IT DOWN!

/Legalzoom - not even once

I have seen it just on my block. Family members come from everywhere, entering the house at night just taking things.
If you live to be old enough give what you want to whonyou want when your alive.
estate planners are not just for rich people, they shelter your assets and good ones make a rock sold will.

Estate planning atty here. The vast majority of will contests are over modest estates. You don't need a multi-million dollar estate to have kids fighting over it. It's about someone winning something or getting even.

As for kids pillaging--if you are the executor, one of the first things to do is change the locks. I've been executor of a few family members' estates and had to watch stuff like a hawk.

A tip for your will: have the atty include a clause that incorporates by reference a separate written list to give personal items. You can change those lists whenever you want.

As an artist, I have a number of probably very vaulable art works done by other artists-one of whom is world famous. No one in the immediate family would enjoy them. Do I sell 'em off-right after the artist dies? Donate to the Smithonian so other folks could enjoy them?
Will be seeing an estate planner next month to get stuff in order. I like the separate list plan.


A few options:
1. Sell them off while you are alive, if you'd like them to go to a good home. (If the artist is still alive, you may need to ensure there aren't any moral rights agreements between the artist and you that might limit your ability to sell at that time.)
2. Gift them to a museum while you are alive (tax write-off benefits).
4. Gift them to a museum after you die (might be tax benefits if your state has an estate tax).
4. Set up a trust to hold them after you die. The trust could loan them to museums for finite periods so others may enjoy them, yet the trust still retains ownership.

High-value art is a bit out of my wheelhouse, but at least the above should be questions to ask your attorney. If that's outside of the attorney's wheelhouse, find a different one.
 
2022-09-15 11:32:15 AM  

Permanent Solutions For Permanent Problems: Most historical preservation requirements are exterior only, but it depends on the area.

Why buy a historical home if you're going to gut it?


Have historical house. In most places your basic "historical home" means little other than a moderate local tax break provided any changes to what its status was granted under needs to be approved by a committee, less you lose the status. Occasionally it means small debates if you want to do something, the owner going, "fine, if you won't let me change it the way i want pull my status", and someone blinking.
 
2022-09-15 11:34:40 AM  

EBN-OZN: Artist: EBN-OZN: ctighe2353: sleze: Wife works in Estate Law.  The stories I hear are fascinating and horrifying.  If you aren't VERY explicit in your will, your kids and relatives will go to war over whatever you leave behind (and destroy their relationships).  If you want your family to stay together, don't skimp on the will.  Don't TRUST someone do to the right thing - WRITE IT DOWN!

/Legalzoom - not even once

I have seen it just on my block. Family members come from everywhere, entering the house at night just taking things.
If you live to be old enough give what you want to whonyou want when your alive.
estate planners are not just for rich people, they shelter your assets and good ones make a rock sold will.

Estate planning atty here. The vast majority of will contests are over modest estates. You don't need a multi-million dollar estate to have kids fighting over it. It's about someone winning something or getting even.

As for kids pillaging--if you are the executor, one of the first things to do is change the locks. I've been executor of a few family members' estates and had to watch stuff like a hawk.

A tip for your will: have the atty include a clause that incorporates by reference a separate written list to give personal items. You can change those lists whenever you want.

As an artist, I have a number of probably very vaulable art works done by other artists-one of whom is world famous. No one in the immediate family would enjoy them. Do I sell 'em off-right after the artist dies? Donate to the Smithonian so other folks could enjoy them?
Will be seeing an estate planner next month to get stuff in order. I like the separate list plan.

A few options:
1. Sell them off while you are alive, if you'd like them to go to a good home. (If the artist is still alive, you may need to ensure there aren't any moral rights agreements between the artist and you that might limit your ability to sell at that time.)
2. Gift them to a museum while you are alive (tax write-off benefits).
4. Gift them to a museum after you die (might be tax benefits if your state has an estate tax).
4. Set up a trust to hold them after you die. The trust could loan them to museums for finite periods so others may enjoy them, yet the trust still retains ownership.

High-value art is a bit out of my wheelhouse, but at least the above should be questions to ask your attorney. If that's outside of the attorney's wheelhouse, find a different one.


5. Transfer to a trust during life, then "lend" them to an interested museum. Trust maintains ownership without incurring costs of storage and the public can enjoy them. Death of the grantor should have no bearing on the arrangement.
 
2022-09-15 11:49:43 AM  

beezeltown: EBN-OZN: Artist: EBN-OZN: ctighe2353: sleze: Wife works in Estate Law.  The stories I hear are fascinating and horrifying.  If you aren't VERY explicit in your will, your kids and relatives will go to war over whatever you leave behind (and destroy their relationships).  If you want your family to stay together, don't skimp on the will.  Don't TRUST someone do to the right thing - WRITE IT DOWN!

/Legalzoom - not even once

I have seen it just on my block. Family members come from everywhere, entering the house at night just taking things.
If you live to be old enough give what you want to whonyou want when your alive.
estate planners are not just for rich people, they shelter your assets and good ones make a rock sold will.

Estate planning atty here. The vast majority of will contests are over modest estates. You don't need a multi-million dollar estate to have kids fighting over it. It's about someone winning something or getting even.

As for kids pillaging--if you are the executor, one of the first things to do is change the locks. I've been executor of a few family members' estates and had to watch stuff like a hawk.

A tip for your will: have the atty include a clause that incorporates by reference a separate written list to give personal items. You can change those lists whenever you want.

As an artist, I have a number of probably very vaulable art works done by other artists-one of whom is world famous. No one in the immediate family would enjoy them. Do I sell 'em off-right after the artist dies? Donate to the Smithonian so other folks could enjoy them?
Will be seeing an estate planner next month to get stuff in order. I like the separate list plan.

A few options:
1. Sell them off while you are alive, if you'd like them to go to a good home. (If the artist is still alive, you may need to ensure there aren't any moral rights agreements between the artist and you that might limit your ability to sell at that time.)
2. Gift them to a museum while you are al ...


Good point.

And setting it up as a revocable inter vivos trust means the grantor can make changes while alive--add or remove items, change fiduciaries, or revoke it altogether.

One caveat: trusts can have ongoing costs, namely fees charged by commercial trust companies. One could appoint a trusted relative or friend to act as trustee instead.
 
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