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(Gizmodo)   Would you buy a NFT from Starbucks? What if it came in Pumpkin Spice NFTs, would you then?   (gizmodo.com) divider line
    More: Asinine, Howard Schultz, Starbucks, Starbucks Odyssey, Espresso, company's current rewards system, Coffee, part of a Starbucks metaverse, Third place  
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261 clicks; posted to Business » on 13 Sep 2022 at 2:20 AM (11 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



29 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-09-12 8:55:32 PM  
seriously? starbucks NFT "trading cards?"

let's cross-post in business AND food, that would be super novel and fungible! a fark first, maybe...
 
2022-09-12 9:01:36 PM  
Would you buy a NFT

No.

from Starbucks?

Hell no.

What if it came in Pumpkin Spice NFTs, would you then?

F*ck you, and you now owe me money for that 2 seconds of brain activity.
 
2022-09-12 9:05:12 PM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: Would you buy a NFT

No.

from Starbucks?

Hell no.

What if it came in Pumpkin Spice NFTs, would you then?

F*ck you, and you now owe me money for that 2 seconds of brain activity.


i'm subby and i love you
 
2022-09-12 9:06:12 PM  
No

/In fact, f*ck no
 
2022-09-12 9:27:21 PM  

luna1580: Benevolent Misanthrope: Would you buy a NFT

No.

from Starbucks?

Hell no.

What if it came in Pumpkin Spice NFTs, would you then?

F*ck you, and you now owe me money for that 2 seconds of brain activity.

i'm subby and i love you


*smooch*
 
2022-09-12 9:36:37 PM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: luna1580: Benevolent Misanthrope: Would you buy a NFT

No.

from Starbucks?

Hell no.

What if it came in Pumpkin Spice NFTs, would you then?

F*ck you, and you now owe me money for that 2 seconds of brain activity.

i'm subby and i love you

*smooch*


🤗
 
2022-09-12 9:42:17 PM  
why would this even be a question?

crypto is a car crash isn't it?... daily.  unsecured this, fraudulent that, insider trading, endless uncovering of every possible crime, a handful of sociopath chancers making bank, and other people losing money... one new, zany, 21st century way after another.

right?
[insane people need not answer this question]
 
2022-09-12 9:51:25 PM  
I'm good.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-09-12 9:57:18 PM  
gahhh, i'm sad i couldn't get my never before food/business cross post.

seriously, THIS ONE TIME the modalities might have been fungible!
 
2022-09-13 12:04:31 AM  
No. What else needs to be said?
 
2022-09-13 12:37:30 AM  
Pumpkin Spice Latte Saga (2014-2020) - Last Week Tonight
Youtube xwnH1nVKb3U



/NSFW language
 
2022-09-13 4:04:31 AM  
FTA : 'Rather than simply rewarding your dollars with a cold brew though, Odyssey will award users with less consumable perks like a virtual espresso martini-making class or access to exclusive merch and events.'

This is the new trend of NFTs with 'utility'. If it's just a trading card that will hopefully rise in value - that's just the old school speculatory NFT garbage. If they start to bait customers with exclusive products or events that are actually appealing (but only accessible through this new program) it might get people on-board despite the stigma of the acronym NFT.
 
2022-09-13 5:11:45 AM  
Sam Adams - SNL
Youtube je1NIf8GeeY
 
2022-09-13 6:25:55 AM  
media-amazon.comView Full Size


/There's one born every minute
//At least with the rock, you have an actual thing
 
2022-09-13 6:57:33 AM  
Can someone explain NFTs to me in a way that they don't sound stupid?  I feel like I'm not getting something critical.  I get that something is worth whatever someone is willing to pay for it, and that making money off peoples willingness to buy worthless things is perfectly legal and moral, but I just can't get my head around NFTs.
 
2022-09-13 7:11:47 AM  

fireclown: Can someone explain NFTs to me in a way that they don't sound stupid?  I feel like I'm not getting something critical.  I get that something is worth whatever someone is willing to pay for it, and that making money off peoples willingness to buy worthless things is perfectly legal and moral, but I just can't get my head around NFTs.


You buy NFTs and then you get rich!  That's all there is to it.  So buy some NFTs now!
 
2022-09-13 7:13:28 AM  

fireclown: Can someone explain NFTs to me in a way that they don't sound stupid?  I feel like I'm not getting something critical.  I get that something is worth whatever someone is willing to pay for it, and that making money off peoples willingness to buy worthless things is perfectly legal and moral, but I just can't get my head around NFTs.


It's a receipt for a URL.

The distributed ledger lets you put text or small programs embedded within it, and by buying the specific coin that has the specific text in it, you have a technically one of a kind link - in that nobody else has that specific string of characters on the internet. Much like how technically no two hamburgers cooked on a grill are EXACTLY the same. It's pedantic fart sniffing. There also isn't a guarantee that the URL you "own" will remain useful. If the server hosting the image goes down, you own a link to a 404 error page.

I will now be posting 377 consecutive opinions bordering on mental illness as to why that system isn't stupid.
 
2022-09-13 10:38:44 AM  
You love those daily promotional emails from your favorite brands, right? What if you could pay thousands of dollars for one, and perhaps get 10% off a coffee!

Pass.
 
2022-09-13 11:25:58 AM  

fireclown: Can someone explain NFTs to me in a way that they don't sound stupid?  I feel like I'm not getting something critical.  I get that something is worth whatever someone is willing to pay for it, and that making money off peoples willingness to buy worthless things is perfectly legal and moral, but I just can't get my head around NFTs.


The progression has gone from : 'holding a coin in your wallet', to 'holding many different coins in your wallet', to 'holding coins and a pointer to ANYthing in your wallet.' As mentioned up thread it could be a jpeg, html, or other code - but you have digital provenance that that particular digital item is yours. This proof of creation/ownership spawned a clique that I compare to the traditional art world - a display of bragging rights bought with wealth. Enough rich people jumped in to make it a multi-billion dollar speculative market over stupid jpeg apes. But people spend 200M on a Jackson Pollock, so whatever.

Now the trend is to have the NFT act as a 'membership' with some sort of real world utility (the article mentions online classes, real world merch and events) Wineries and high end restaurants are trying this out too. There doesn't seem to be a clear reason WHY this would be better than existing memberships except for collaboration with other seperate businesses - but in a billion dollar industry, I'm keeping an eye from the sidelines to see if something cool pops up eventually.
 
2022-09-13 1:23:46 PM  
I keep saying that I don't understand technology anymore, but I think the real problem is that I don't understand people anymore.
 
hej
2022-09-13 10:48:50 PM  

Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: It's a receipt for a URL.

The distributed ledger lets you put text or small programs embedded within it, and by buying the specific coin that has the specific text in it, you have a technically one of a kind link - in that nobody else has that specific string of characters on the internet.


The specific string of characters can (and likely will) exist elsewhere on the internet, just not elsewhere on the same blockchain AFAIK.  The URLs, much like the content found by following them, are entirely copyable.

/not a crypto expert
 
hej
2022-09-13 10:58:37 PM  

fireclown: Can someone explain NFTs to me in a way that they don't sound stupid?  I feel like I'm not getting something critical.  I get that something is worth whatever someone is willing to pay for it, and that making money off peoples willingness to buy worthless things is perfectly legal and moral, but I just can't get my head around NFTs.


I'm not sure if you're asking about NFTs as a technology, or NFTs as a concept, or functionally and culturally how are people using them.  Others have already take a stab at explaining them from a technical aspect, and honestly, I don't think it's all that important, apart from pointing out that it's laughably stupid.  There's any number of YouTube videos out there explaining why.

As a concept; you're supposedly staking a digital claim to digital art of something else that is allegedly unique and interesting.  You "own" the NFT by owning a related crypto coin.

As far as how they realistically work;  Random guy on the internet that wants to get rich quick creates a NFT "project" that involves a bunch of pictures of whatever things they think are meme worthy.  Pictures get put online and they mint crypto coins that are associated with the pictures.  Then they start the pump-and-dump hype train to get people to buy the coins, and run off with the fiat currency that all the suckers used to buy the crypto "currency" that went with the NFTs.  It's a pyramid scheme like any other.  If you want to make money, you start your own pyramid.
 
2022-09-14 5:17:33 AM  

hej: fireclown: Can someone explain NFTs to me in a way that they don't sound stupid?  I feel like I'm not getting something critical.  I get that something is worth whatever someone is willing to pay for it, and that making money off peoples willingness to buy worthless things is perfectly legal and moral, but I just can't get my head around NFTs.

I'm not sure if you're asking about NFTs as a technology, or NFTs as a concept, or functionally and culturally how are people using them.  Others have already take a stab at explaining them from a technical aspect, and honestly, I don't think it's all that important, apart from pointing out that it's laughably stupid.  There's any number of YouTube videos out there explaining why.

As a concept; you're supposedly staking a digital claim to digital art of something else that is allegedly unique and interesting.  You "own" the NFT by owning a related crypto coin.

As far as how they realistically work;  Random guy on the internet that wants to get rich quick creates a NFT "project" that involves a bunch of pictures of whatever things they think are meme worthy.  Pictures get put online and they mint crypto coins that are associated with the pictures.  Then they start the pump-and-dump hype train to get people to buy the coins, and run off with the fiat currency that all the suckers used to buy the crypto "currency" that went with the NFTs.  It's a pyramid scheme like any other.  If you want to make money, you start your own pyramid.


There a few that work the way you describe (a token gives you 'shares' of a piece of 'digital art'), but most of the time the actual piece of digital content belongs directly to you and is associated with your wallet completely separate from any coin.

Most of them are still purchased by some version of Ethereum but Solana is starting to be a cheaper alternative.
 
hej
2022-09-14 8:29:12 AM  

GriffXX: hej: fireclown: Can someone explain NFTs to me in a way that they don't sound stupid?  I feel like I'm not getting something critical.  I get that something is worth whatever someone is willing to pay for it, and that making money off peoples willingness to buy worthless things is perfectly legal and moral, but I just can't get my head around NFTs.

I'm not sure if you're asking about NFTs as a technology, or NFTs as a concept, or functionally and culturally how are people using them.  Others have already take a stab at explaining them from a technical aspect, and honestly, I don't think it's all that important, apart from pointing out that it's laughably stupid.  There's any number of YouTube videos out there explaining why.

As a concept; you're supposedly staking a digital claim to digital art of something else that is allegedly unique and interesting.  You "own" the NFT by owning a related crypto coin.

As far as how they realistically work;  Random guy on the internet that wants to get rich quick creates a NFT "project" that involves a bunch of pictures of whatever things they think are meme worthy.  Pictures get put online and they mint crypto coins that are associated with the pictures.  Then they start the pump-and-dump hype train to get people to buy the coins, and run off with the fiat currency that all the suckers used to buy the crypto "currency" that went with the NFTs.  It's a pyramid scheme like any other.  If you want to make money, you start your own pyramid.

There a few that work the way you describe (a token gives you 'shares' of a piece of 'digital art'), but most of the time the actual piece of digital content belongs directly to you and is associated with your wallet completely separate from any coin.

Most of them are still purchased by some version of Ethereum but Solana is starting to be a cheaper alternative.


I thought wallets just contained your tokens?  How can data get in there independently of coins?
 
2022-09-14 8:44:36 AM  
so is this NFT nonsense allied with crypto because it's a wholly digital thing that only has value in a digital marketplace?  Or is there something that ties them more closely?

eg is there some actual reason why I couldn't buy an NFT with a VISA payment or bank transfer?  Or is it about secure storage/holding... ?  why wouldn't I just put it on a storage device not connected to the internet?
 
hej
2022-09-14 10:08:55 AM  

Lady J: so is this NFT nonsense allied with crypto because it's a wholly digital thing that only has value in a digital marketplace?  Or is there something that ties them more closely?

eg is there some actual reason why I couldn't buy an NFT with a VISA payment or bank transfer?  Or is it about secure storage/holding... ?  why wouldn't I just put it on a storage device not connected to the internet?


1) The whole concept is being able to use crypto to buy and trade art or other unique digital creations.  
2) I would be pretty shocked if any credit card vendor allowed you to use your credit line with them to buy any crypto.
3) It's not about security.  In fact, as mentioned before, the assets are actually extremely easy to copy/steal.
4) The thing that you own and control isn't the artwork or other asset, it's a URL for locating the asset.  I.e. no different than bookmarks you make in your browser.  See point #2 above.  The people creating the NFTs are going to host them online.  Without them being online, the URL that you "own" doesn't actually work.  When the day comes that the person who is hosting them at that URL stops doing so (e.g. they don't want to pay for it anymore), the NFT no longer "works".  Disconnecting your NFT from the internet doesn't make any sense, since by nature, NFT assets must be on the internet.
 
2022-09-14 12:08:32 PM  

hej: Lady J: so is this NFT nonsense allied with crypto because it's a wholly digital thing that only has value in a digital marketplace?  Or is there something that ties them more closely?

eg is there some actual reason why I couldn't buy an NFT with a VISA payment or bank transfer?  Or is it about secure storage/holding... ?  why wouldn't I just put it on a storage device not connected to the internet?

1) The whole concept is being able to use crypto to buy and trade art or other unique digital creations.  
2) I would be pretty shocked if any credit card vendor allowed you to use your credit line with them to buy any crypto.
3) It's not about security.  In fact, as mentioned before, the assets are actually extremely easy to copy/steal.
4) The thing that you own and control isn't the artwork or other asset, it's a URL for locating the asset.  I.e. no different than bookmarks you make in your browser.  See point #2 above.  The people creating the NFTs are going to host them online.  Without them being online, the URL that you "own" doesn't actually work.  When the day comes that the person who is hosting them at that URL stops doing so (e.g. they don't want to pay for it anymore), the NFT no longer "works".  Disconnecting your NFT from the internet doesn't make any sense, since by nature, NFT assets must be on the internet.


so the whole thing is elaborate nonsense?
 
hej
2022-09-14 12:17:28 PM  

Lady J: hej: Lady J: so is this NFT nonsense allied with crypto because it's a wholly digital thing that only has value in a digital marketplace?  Or is there something that ties them more closely?

eg is there some actual reason why I couldn't buy an NFT with a VISA payment or bank transfer?  Or is it about secure storage/holding... ?  why wouldn't I just put it on a storage device not connected to the internet?

1) The whole concept is being able to use crypto to buy and trade art or other unique digital creations.  
2) I would be pretty shocked if any credit card vendor allowed you to use your credit line with them to buy any crypto.
3) It's not about security.  In fact, as mentioned before, the assets are actually extremely easy to copy/steal.
4) The thing that you own and control isn't the artwork or other asset, it's a URL for locating the asset.  I.e. no different than bookmarks you make in your browser.  See point #2 above.  The people creating the NFTs are going to host them online.  Without them being online, the URL that you "own" doesn't actually work.  When the day comes that the person who is hosting them at that URL stops doing so (e.g. they don't want to pay for it anymore), the NFT no longer "works".  Disconnecting your NFT from the internet doesn't make any sense, since by nature, NFT assets must be on the internet.

so the whole thing is elaborate nonsense?


It is once you acknowledge that there's no real motivation for anyone to recognize some obscure crypto ecosystem as an authority on who owns things that are freely copyable.
 
2022-09-14 12:55:41 PM  

hej: It is once you acknowledge that there's no real motivation for anyone to recognize some obscure crypto ecosystem as an authority on who owns things that are freely copyable.


someone upfred put it well...

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