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(Smithsonian Magazine)   Interview about that time a DC-8 went supersonic - on purpose   (smithsonianmag.com) divider line
    More: Cool, Aerodynamics, Mach number, Shock wave, Supersonic, Aviation terminology, Hypersonic, Douglas Aircraft Company, Douglas DC-8-43  
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1587 clicks; posted to STEM » on 21 Aug 2022 at 8:05 PM (14 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



11 Comments     (+0 »)
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2022-08-21 7:05:32 PM  
CSB
 
2022-08-21 8:08:59 PM  
Ohhhh, that Tom Cruise religion is sure to make a comeback now....
 
2022-08-21 8:40:48 PM  
I assume that they had extra uniforms on board, because trying to pull out of a Mach 1+ dive where you're -500ft/sec vertical and having the elevator do nothing, then the stabilizer do nothing as well is pretty much a code brown situation.

One of the things new pilots have a hard time with is stall training- everything is telling you to get the nose up but the only solution is to push it down hard.  I'll have to remember that the same thing works if I ever end up in a DC-8 doing a power dive.
 
2022-08-21 8:42:19 PM  
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And been escorted by Chuck Yeager makes this even cooler.
 
2022-08-21 8:46:07 PM  
That guy and the pilot:

Duke Nukem Line - I've Got Balls Of Steel
Youtube j3DKl3BXgNU
 
2022-08-21 8:46:55 PM  
 
2022-08-21 8:50:37 PM  
The DC-8 is more famous for being certified for in-flight thrust reversal to get fast descent rates. You could lean forward to look out the front window and if you can see the runway below, you can descent fast enough to make the landing.
 
2022-08-22 10:54:07 AM  
Was this Flight 33? Glad they made it back.

/obscure?
 
2022-08-22 11:23:07 AM  

Glockenspiel Hero: I assume that they had extra uniforms on board, because trying to pull out of a Mach 1+ dive where you're -500ft/sec vertical and having the elevator do nothing, then the stabilizer do nothing as well is pretty much a code brown situation.

One of the things new pilots have a hard time with is stall training- everything is telling you to get the nose up but the only solution is to push it down hard.  I'll have to remember that the same thing works if I ever end up in a DC-8 doing a power dive.


For those of us who aren't experts, what's the difference between the elevator and the stabilizer? I thought they were the same surface. Was he talking about using the trim to change the stabilizer angle?

Also, it seems like the stall recovery was unusual because they stalled while already in a dive, so pushing it further into the dive is even weirder.
 
2022-08-22 11:39:59 AM  

Slypork: Was this Flight 33? Glad they made it back.

/obscure?


Say "Hi!" to the dinosaurs and the Trylon and Perisphere for me!
 
2022-08-22 2:18:51 PM  

Arkanaut: Glockenspiel Hero: I assume that they had extra uniforms on board, because trying to pull out of a Mach 1+ dive where you're -500ft/sec vertical and having the elevator do nothing, then the stabilizer do nothing as well is pretty much a code brown situation.

One of the things new pilots have a hard time with is stall training- everything is telling you to get the nose up but the only solution is to push it down hard.  I'll have to remember that the same thing works if I ever end up in a DC-8 doing a power dive.

For those of us who aren't experts, what's the difference between the elevator and the stabilizer? I thought they were the same surface. Was he talking about using the trim to change the stabilizer angle?

Also, it seems like the stall recovery was unusual because they stalled while already in a dive, so pushing it further into the dive is even weirder.


The stabilizer is the entire horizontal tail surface.  The elevator is the bit at the back of the stabilizer that is used to provide climb or descent.  The stabilizer is normally moved to adjust the trim; to keep the aircraft flying in the ideal position for maximum efficiency and control.

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